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st pride, that I commend the courage, fortitude, fidelity, efficiency, and endurance of the officers and men of my command. For two months under fire, working day and night, through good and inclement weather, no murmur was heard, but the most determined spirit evinced to subdue the enemies of our country. I must specially commend Colonel Price, Colonel Champion, Colonel Taylor, and Colonel McClain, for promptness and efficiency as officers. Also Surgeons Beach, Walton, Wing, Pierce, and Averdick, for care and attention to my sick and wounded. Also of Father Cooney and Chaplain Burkett, for well-timed and faithful ministrations as chaplains. The loss of my brigade was heavy, being, up to July 1: Killedcommissioned officers, 4; enlisted men, 91. Wounded-commissioned officers, 22; enlisted men, 380. Missing-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 60. Making a total of killed, wounded, and missing in officers, of 28 ; and of enlisted men, 531. Grand total, 559. For particular
Peter Simonson (search for this): chapter 23
fifteenth Illinois and Ninety-sixth Illinois resisted with persistent courage under a most galling fire, but held the enemy at bay, falling back and changing front, until I brought up the Fortieth Ohio, Ninety-ninth Ohio, and Fifty-first Ohio, when we drove the enemy back from my flank and firmly maintained my position. These regiments behaved with great gallantry. The Fifth Indiana Battery, attached to this brigade, under command of Lieutenant Morrison, and under supervision of brave Captain Simonson, chief of artillery of the division, had been left in the rear by order of major-general commanding division, and being assailed by a portion of the enemy's columns, made a most determined and successful defense. The brave officers and men hurled such storms of shell, shot, and canister upon the rebel lines that they were enabled to maintain their position until General Hooker's command, advancing, aided them in turning back the rebel column, which was advancing far in rear of our left
Ohio, who in the darkness charged into the rebel lines and with several of his men were surrounded and captured. He is a very valuable officer. Colonel Price was wounded severely. Colonel Champion and Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of the Ninety-sixth Illinois,were also wounded. These officers behaved with great gallantry. In this connection I must also mention the efficient conduct of Colonel McClain and Lieutenant-Colonel Wood, Fifty-first Ohio Volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Evans and Major Hoskins, Twenty-first Kentucky. Every officer and man, with few exceptions, did their duty, and I regret that I cannot mention each one personally. Without the most determined courage and efficiency as soldiers on their part, I must have been beaten. I congratulate them on winning one of the most fiercely contested fights in the history of this rebellion. This fight took place on one of the spurs of Kenesaw Mountain. June 21, we strengthened our works under a heavy cannonade from four ba
J. P. Phipps (search for this): chapter 23
22; enlisted men, 380. Missing-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 60. Making a total of killed, wounded, and missing in officers, of 28 ; and of enlisted men, 531. Grand total, 559. For particulars of loss to each portion of thq command, and at what time, see tabular statement as part of this report. We took in prisoners 3 officers and 88 enlisted men; total 91. (See provostmarshal's statement. Of my staff-Capt. H. F. Temple, acting assistant adjutant-general; my aides, Lieut. J. P. Phipps and Lieut. J. Clarence Peck; Captain North, brigadd inspector; Lieutenant Gunn, topographical engineer; Lieutenant Pepoon, provost-marshal; Captain Hodgdon, commissary; Lieutenant Dean, controlling ambulances, and Lieutenant Conyers, commanding provost guards — I can most truthfully say that every member of it has so demeaned himself as to merit promotion. Brave, faithful, and efficient, they are an honor to the positions they hold. Respectfully, Walter C. Whitaker, Brigadier
J. A. Pierce (search for this): chapter 23
just and honest pride, that I commend the courage, fortitude, fidelity, efficiency, and endurance of the officers and men of my command. For two months under fire, working day and night, through good and inclement weather, no murmur was heard, but the most determined spirit evinced to subdue the enemies of our country. I must specially commend Colonel Price, Colonel Champion, Colonel Taylor, and Colonel McClain, for promptness and efficiency as officers. Also Surgeons Beach, Walton, Wing, Pierce, and Averdick, for care and attention to my sick and wounded. Also of Father Cooney and Chaplain Burkett, for well-timed and faithful ministrations as chaplains. The loss of my brigade was heavy, being, up to July 1: Killedcommissioned officers, 4; enlisted men, 91. Wounded-commissioned officers, 22; enlisted men, 380. Missing-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 60. Making a total of killed, wounded, and missing in officers, of 28 ; and of enlisted men, 531. Grand total, 559. F
George W. Cummins (search for this): chapter 23
following regiments, Twenty-first Kentucky, Colonel Price; Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Champion; Fortieth Ohio, Colonel Taylor; One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore; Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel Mc-Clain; Ninety-ninth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cummins commanding; Eighty-fourth Indiana, Col. A. J. Neff, and Thirty-fifth Indiana. Major Dufficy commanding, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, Lieut. A. Morrison commanding, numbering 155 commissioned officers and 2,875 enlisted men, making a tthe right of the Thirty-fifth Indiana were driven by superior numbers from their position, and the enemy gained a iodgment in my line. 'Twas dark. Friend and foe were mixed. Brave Major Dufficy fell boldly and fearlessly rallying his men. Colonel Cummins, with the Ninety-ninth Ohio, repelled from his left flank, while the Fifty-first Ohio and Ninety-sixth Illinois drove them from their front. It was a time of peril and great danger, but ordering forward the Fortieth Ohio, those bold soldier
Durbin Ward (search for this): chapter 23
congratulate them on winning one of the most fiercely contested fights in the history of this rebellion. This fight took place on one of the spurs of Kenesaw Mountain. June 21, we strengthened our works under a heavy cannonade from four batteries. The skirmishing was very severe day and night. June 22, the artillery firing was again renewed with great fury. At 10 p. m. my brigade was relieved by a brigade from the Fourteenth Corps, and we moved three miles to the right, relieving General Ward's brigade, of the Twentieth Corps. The Ninetyninth Ohio was to-day transferred to the Twenty-third Corps by order of General Thomas, and its place supplied by the Forty-fifth Ohio. It is a gallant and efficient regiment, and carries my best wishes wherever it may go. June 23, I was ordered to take the skirmish line in my front. Ordering forward the Eighty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Neff commanding, they gallantly assaulted and took the enemy's line, with 28 men and 2 officers prisoners,
G. W. Pepoon (search for this): chapter 23
in officers, of 28 ; and of enlisted men, 531. Grand total, 559. For particulars of loss to each portion of thq command, and at what time, see tabular statement as part of this report. We took in prisoners 3 officers and 88 enlisted men; total 91. (See provostmarshal's statement. Of my staff-Capt. H. F. Temple, acting assistant adjutant-general; my aides, Lieut. J. P. Phipps and Lieut. J. Clarence Peck; Captain North, brigadd inspector; Lieutenant Gunn, topographical engineer; Lieutenant Pepoon, provost-marshal; Captain Hodgdon, commissary; Lieutenant Dean, controlling ambulances, and Lieutenant Conyers, commanding provost guards — I can most truthfully say that every member of it has so demeaned himself as to merit promotion. Brave, faithful, and efficient, they are an honor to the positions they hold. Respectfully, Walter C. Whitaker, Brigadier-General, Second Brigade, First Division, Fourth Corps, Army of the Cumberland. Major Sinclair, Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Di
J. R. Dean (search for this): chapter 23
. For particulars of loss to each portion of thq command, and at what time, see tabular statement as part of this report. We took in prisoners 3 officers and 88 enlisted men; total 91. (See provostmarshal's statement. Of my staff-Capt. H. F. Temple, acting assistant adjutant-general; my aides, Lieut. J. P. Phipps and Lieut. J. Clarence Peck; Captain North, brigadd inspector; Lieutenant Gunn, topographical engineer; Lieutenant Pepoon, provost-marshal; Captain Hodgdon, commissary; Lieutenant Dean, controlling ambulances, and Lieutenant Conyers, commanding provost guards — I can most truthfully say that every member of it has so demeaned himself as to merit promotion. Brave, faithful, and efficient, they are an honor to the positions they hold. Respectfully, Walter C. Whitaker, Brigadier-General, Second Brigade, First Division, Fourth Corps, Army of the Cumberland. Major Sinclair, Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, Fourth Corps. Inclosure no. 1. List of pr
William D. Williams (search for this): chapter 23
ered the loss of that good and brave officer, Lieut. Thomas M. Gunn, topographical engineer of the brigade, who was captured by the enemy while fearlessly in the discharge of his duty. We remained before the enemy, with heavy skirmishing, until the 17th, when the rebels fell back on their left, falling back so as to form a line almost at right angles with that part of his position not abandoned. We pursued him and went into line with the Second Brigade, of Wood's division, on our left and Williams' division on our right. Heavy works were again thrown up for defense. June 18, advanced, my skirmishers being the Ninety-ninth Ohio, under command of Captain Bope (both field officers being sick). This regiment advanced most gallantly, driving the enemy with great impetuosity, and taking position within 100 yards of the enemy's lines. It rained incessantly, and these brave men in their rifle-pits, some in water nearly waist deep, resisted suc. cessfully every effort made to dislodge them
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