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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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William Grose (search for this): chapter 30
I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers in the recent campaign resulting in the capture of the city of Atlanta: On the morning of May 3, 1864, in obedience to the order of Col. William Grose, commanding brigade, this regiment marched from Blue Springs, Tenn., in the direction of Red Clay, Ga., at which place the command went into camp for the night. At 6 a. m. the next day moved toward Dalton, and in the afternoon formed line d to form my regiment to move across an open field and take a hill or eminence from the enemy, which was the key to their position and which commanded the enemy's main line of works. This movement was executed under the eyes of both brigade (General Grose) and division (General Kimball) commanders, and was performed under a most terrific fire of artillery and musketry, the regiment moving with precision and alacritv leaving none behind, except the dead and wounded. The hill was gallantly car
P. S. Bannister (search for this): chapter 30
he Third Brigade joined us. The whole command then crossed the creek, formed line, and make good works. On the 20th the Eighth Kansas Volunteers take our place; we move to the left, take position in second line; have 1 man killed. On July 21 change position; 1 man of the picket company is wounded. At 3 a. m. July 22 aroused for move. At daylight pass through the enemy's works. After a short march come within sight of the city of Atlanta. A company of skirmishers, commanded [by] Lieut. P. S. Bannister, Company C, moved forward and drive the enemy into his works. Sergt. Martin L. Johnson, Company I, was killed, and 2 other men wounded. On the 23d of July Capt. William S. Frost, Company E, while ia command of the picket company, was wounded in leg. On the 26th of July the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers moves into position on the front line at the extreme left of the Fourth Army Corps. The regiment does not change position until on August 25 at 11 p. m. it moves with the army o
Richard L. Mangan (search for this): chapter 30
mpany on picket, who drive back the rebel skirmishers. The enemy then charge on this line with a line of battle, compelling our line to retire to its old position, with the loss of 1 first sergeant captured. On the 24th of June this regiment relieves the Thirtieth Indiana from the front line. Send one company on picket. We were so close to the main works of the enemy that no part of a person's body could be exposed above the works only as a mark for the rebel sharpshooters. Second Lieut. Richard L. Mangan, Company D, receives gunshot wound, causing amputation of left leg. The casualties of that day were 3 men wounded and 2 killed. On the morning of June 27 our forces are massed for an assault on the works of the enemy in our immediate front, this division (the First) remaining in position for any emergency. July 3, in obedience of brigade commander, this regiment marched toward Marietta, passing the town at about noon. At night we again came upon the enemy, form line, build tem
rive the enemy into his works. Sergt. Martin L. Johnson, Company I, was killed, and 2 other men wounded. On the 23d of July Capt. William S. Frost, Company E, while ia command of the picket company, was wounded in leg. On the 26th of July the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers moves into position on the front line at the extreme left of the Fourth Army Corps. The regiment does not change position until on August 25 at 11 p. m. it moves with the army on the last grand flank movement of Major-General Sh: rman, by which the city of Atlanta fell into Federal hands. I was detailed as corps officer of the day, and to me was committed the difficult and important task of drawing in the pickets of the corps and covering the movement, a duty which I accomplished without the loss of a single man. The regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kilgour, was put on picket on the morning of the 26th and covered the movement of troops south from the suburbs of the city on that morning. Sho
Nathan Kimball (search for this): chapter 30
osition in force at Lovejoy's Station; formed line and moved into action at 3 p. m. We steadily advanced in line of battle, driving the enemy three-quarters of a mile, till within reach of their works. I was then ordered to form my regiment to move across an open field and take a hill or eminence from the enemy, which was the key to their position and which commanded the enemy's main line of works. This movement was executed under the eyes of both brigade (General Grose) and division (General Kimball) commanders, and was performed under a most terrific fire of artillery and musketry, the regiment moving with precision and alacritv leaving none behind, except the dead and wounded. The hill was gallantly carried and firmly held, as well as the first line of the enemy's works, capturing nearly the whole force of their skirmishers in front of the regiment. The skirmishers under Lieutenant Blodgett, Company E, performed well their part. Two men of this force, Draper S. Angell, Compan
Martin L. Johnson (search for this): chapter 30
make good works. On the 20th the Eighth Kansas Volunteers take our place; we move to the left, take position in second line; have 1 man killed. On July 21 change position; 1 man of the picket company is wounded. At 3 a. m. July 22 aroused for move. At daylight pass through the enemy's works. After a short march come within sight of the city of Atlanta. A company of skirmishers, commanded [by] Lieut. P. S. Bannister, Company C, moved forward and drive the enemy into his works. Sergt. Martin L. Johnson, Company I, was killed, and 2 other men wounded. On the 23d of July Capt. William S. Frost, Company E, while ia command of the picket company, was wounded in leg. On the 26th of July the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers moves into position on the front line at the extreme left of the Fourth Army Corps. The regiment does not change position until on August 25 at 11 p. m. it moves with the army on the last grand flank movement of Major-General Sh: rman, by which the city of Atlanta
James A. Watson (search for this): chapter 30
riving before them the Eighty-first Indiana Volunteers, who were also on picket deployed on our right. The Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers was immediately moved to the support of the Eighty-first Indiana Volunteers and held the rebels in check until a regiment of the First Brigade (the Thirty-eighth Illinois) came to our assistance, when the enemy was driven from the field toward the city in confusion. In this skirmish we captured 1 prisoner, killed 2, and wounded 2 of the enemy. Maj. James A. Watson, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers, rendered efficient services in this affair. This regiment continued with the brigade until the 28th, when we formed line of battle and took position on the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad, which, on the morning of the 29th, we proceeded to destroy. Three regiments were placed under my command, to wit, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and Thirty-first Regiment Indiana Volunteers, for the execution of the work, and the Seventy-fifth Illinois
anders, and was performed under a most terrific fire of artillery and musketry, the regiment moving with precision and alacritv leaving none behind, except the dead and wounded. The hill was gallantly carried and firmly held, as well as the first line of the enemy's works, capturing nearly the whole force of their skirmishers in front of the regiment. The skirmishers under Lieutenant Blodgett, Company E, performed well their part. Two men of this force, Draper S. Angell, Company H, and John Nass, Company E, capturing and taking to the rear 8 prisoners. We held this position till 7 a. m. on the morning of the 3d, when we were relieved by the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. On the 4th moved to Jonesborough, on the 6th to Cedar Bluffs, and on the 7th to our present camp on the Decatur railroad east of the city of Atlanta. During this long, wearisome campaign the officers and men were ever eager to obey all orders of their superior officers, doing their full duty at all
Cedar Bluffs (search for this): chapter 30
line of the enemy's works, capturing nearly the whole force of their skirmishers in front of the regiment. The skirmishers under Lieutenant Blodgett, Company E, performed well their part. Two men of this force, Draper S. Angell, Company H, and John Nass, Company E, capturing and taking to the rear 8 prisoners. We held this position till 7 a. m. on the morning of the 3d, when we were relieved by the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. On the 4th moved to Jonesborough, on the 6th to Cedar Bluffs, and on the 7th to our present camp on the Decatur railroad east of the city of Atlanta. During this long, wearisome campaign the officers and men were ever eager to obey all orders of their superior officers, doing their full duty at all times as patriot soldiers. Not an exception can be mentioned. In the death of Capt. Robert Hale, Company I, the regiment has lost one of its best officers, the country a valiant and patriotic soldier. He was respected and beloved by all who kne
ded. Again, on June 15, we find no enemy in our front. In the afternoon, having come upon the enemy, the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers move in second line, joining the Eightieth Illinois on the left and Ninetieth Ohio on the right. At night on the 16th this regiment, under cover of the darkness, make good works on the skirmish line, but the next morning,, the 17th, leave them and move forward to occupy those of the enemy, which he has evacuated. This regiment is in reserve till the 19th June. After moving through the abandoned works of the enemy on that day one company is sent forward as skirmishers, boldly charge across a cleared field, killing, capturing, and driving a heavy line of skirmishers from their works, with the loss of 4 men seriously wounded. On the 21st of June this regiment is relieved by a portion of the Fourteenth Army Corps from the skirmish line and take a new position and, in a drenching rain, are hard at work, when the enemy opens a terrific fire of arti
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