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Henry Coalter Cabell (search for this): chapter 20
r having returned from the West) toward Beulah Church. Colonel Cabell received orders on the evening of the 31st of May, or . He was the first man I fell in with as I fell back, Colonel Cabell and little Barrett, his courier, being ahead of the co whip. On the instant I took my revenge, riding up to Colonel Cabell, taking off my hat with a profound bow, and asking whes; but we (lid so without serious mishap; so, perhaps, Colonel Cabell may have been more nearly right than I after all. The different one if this change had not been made. Under Colonel Cabell's instructions and with the aid of the division pioneet Cold Harbor was the worst place he was ever sent to. Colonel Cabell was necessarily a great part of the time at these headnout than on any other occasion during the entire war. Colonel Cabell insisted I should go back to our headquarters camp, whhis temperament, I answered quietly that I was adjutant of Cabell's Battalion of Artillery, and that the commanding officer
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 20
reen; but although he got a little the start of Lee, yet, when he reached his immediate objective, Lee was in line of battle at Hanover Junction, directly across the line of further progress. It isf many intelligent Confederate officers that if Lee had not been attacked by disabling disease, thehis army to the southern bank of the river with Lee on the stream between his two wings; it is fairril and to have withdrawn in good time. General Lee's indisposition, about this time, was reallth the almost incredible physical powers of General Lee. On two occasions, just before and just af person. On the first round I did not find General Lee at his quarters, and was told that he had r, with his prayer-book open before him, and General Lee in his tent, wide-awake, poring over a map here would it be? When Grant slid away from Lee at Atlee's, we felt satisfied that he was, as ue of the roughest and most daring riders on General Lee's staff,later, professor of mathematics at [2 more...]
Morgan Calloway (search for this): chapter 20
column. I am certain it did a little later. Calloway, its commanding officer, to whom we have alreett, his courier, being ahead of the column. Calloway asked me if I didn't think we were running soner said than done. I sprang from my horse. Calloway's guns were in battery on the instant, I, by able to accomplish but for the aid of one of Calloway's guns, which, under command of Lieutenant Roo so. But first, and just before dark, I took Calloway over all the confusing and obscure part of thoing with the party to fetch the gun out, but Calloway and everyone concerned insisted that I must nnd after showing and explaining everything to Calloway, I went back to camp and laid down. I hadnd before my face and being unable to see it. Calloway and I rode side by side, inclining to the lefeing a rapid walker, I kept a little ahead of Calloway, and very soon was stopped again, by someone eant we had reached the dead horses, and told Calloway we were almost upon the gun. He dismounted, h[4 more...]
June 3d, The expected battle begins early. This journal also notes the weakness of Kershaw's Salient, and that the enemy was aware of it, and was massing heavily in front of it. Three brigades were sent to support Kershaw-Anderson's, Gregg's, and Law's. We also set to work to rectify the lines about this point. Gen. E. M. Law, of Alabama, is probably entitled to the credit of this suggestion, which had so important a bearing upon our success. He laid off the new line with his own hand and suGen. E. M. Law, of Alabama, is probably entitled to the credit of this suggestion, which had so important a bearing upon our success. He laid off the new line with his own hand and superintended the construction of it during the night of the 2d. The record of the 3d might have been a very different one if this change had not been made. Under Colonel Cabell's instructions and with the aid of the division pioneer corps, I opened roads through the woods for the more rapid and convenient transmission of artillery ammunition, and put up two or three little bridges across ravines with the same view. While I was superintending this work, the fire at the time being lively, I h
Ulysses Simpson Grant (search for this): chapter 20
like two Coursers, side by side, for the next goal Grant waiting for reinforcements Lee seriously Indisposed18th, what might perhaps be termed a genuine attack, Grant, on the evening of the 20th, slid off toward Bowlingh Anna would have had a very different termination. Grant ran great risk in taking his army to the southern bad withdrew, Does he never, never sleep? Again General Grant slid to the east, and we moved off upon a paralls a furlough hollow! We almost began to hope that Grant had gotten enough. Even his apparent, yes, real, suup long ago. Was he about to do so? The fact is, Grant was waiting for reinforcements. He had been heavily hands to each other. When they clasped hands, then Grant would attack once more; would make his great final effort. When and where would it be? When Grant slid away from Lee at Atlee's, we felt satisfied that he wasipated battle on the 3d, as it really occurred. General Grant in his memoirs says in express terms, The 2d of
Lawrence Massillon Keitt (search for this): chapter 20
ide, for the next goal Grant waiting for reinforcements Lee seriously Indisposed one of his three corps commanders disabled by wounds, another by sickness Mickey and the children it Beats a furlough Hollow a baby in battle death of Lawrence M. Keitt and demoralization of his command splendid services of Lieut. Robt. Falligant, of Georgia, with a single gun hot fighting the evening of June 1st building roads and bridges and getting ready June 2d removal of Falligant's lone gun at nith our division, Kershaw's; but we (lid so without serious mishap; so, perhaps, Colonel Cabell may have been more nearly right than I after all. The first definite recollection I have, after what I have just related, is of the breaking of Col. Lawrence M. Keitt's big South Carolina regiment, which had just come to the army and been entered in Kershaw's old brigade, and probably outnumbered all the balance of that command. General Kershaw had put this and another of his brigades into action not
Charles Williams Field (search for this): chapter 20
very bones crack, but it did no good; if compelled to wriggle out of one hole they wriggled into another. So far as I recollect, however, this affair was of no real significance. Our other troops stood firm, and we lost no ground. I think none of the guns of the battery were engaged. Meanwhile the three divisions of our corps-the First, since Longstreet's wounding, under command of Major-General R. H. Anderson-had settled into alignment in the following order, beginning from the left: Field, Pickett, Kershaw. On the right of Kershaw's was Hoke's division, which had been under Beauregard and had joined the Army of Northern Virginia only the night before. The ground upon which our troops had thus felt and fought their way into line was the historic field of Cold Harbor, and the day was the first of June, 1864. In the afternoon a furious attack was made on the left of Hoke and right of Kershaw; and Clingman's, the left brigade of Hoke and Wofford's, the right brigade of Kers
Robert Frederick Hoke (search for this): chapter 20
y from Lee at Atlee's, we felt satisfied that he was, as usual, making for the south and east, so Hoke was ordered toward Cold Harbor, and Kershaw (now our division general, McLaws never having returnfollowing order, beginning from the left: Field, Pickett, Kershaw. On the right of Kershaw's was Hoke's division, which had been under Beauregard and had joined the Army of Northern Virginia only thehe day was the first of June, 1864. In the afternoon a furious attack was made on the left of Hoke and right of Kershaw; and Clingman's, the left brigade of Hoke and Wofford's, the right brigade oHoke and Wofford's, the right brigade of Kershaw gave way, and the Federal troops poured into the gap over a marshy piece of ground which had not been properly covered by either of these two brigades. Both Field and Pickett sent aid to Ke left in very bad shape. While Wofford was bending back the right of his line to connect with Hoke, who, even with the aid sent him, had not quite succeeded in regaining his original position, Ker
Jubal Early (search for this): chapter 20
bling disease, the movements of the two armies about the North Anna would have had a very different termination. Grant ran great risk in taking his army to the southern bank of the river with Lee on the stream between his two wings; it is fair to add that he seems to have realized his peril and to have withdrawn in good time. General Lee's indisposition, about this time, was really serious. Some of us will never forget how shocked and alarmed we were at seeing him in an ambulance. General Early, in his address before mentioned, says of this matter: One of his three corps commanders had been disabled by wounds at the Wilderness, and another was too sick to command his corps, while he himself was suffering from a most annoying and weakening disease. In fact nothing but his own determined will enabled him to keep the field at all; and it was there rendered more manifest than ever that he was the head and front, the very life and soul of his army. It was about this date t
Osmun Latrobe (search for this): chapter 20
than before, saying he had been ordered to take that battalion to Beulah Church, and he proposed to do it, and he even added that when he wanted any advice from me he would ask it. I felt a nearer approach to heat than ever before or after, in all my intercourse with my friend and commander, and I assured him I would not obtrude my advice again. I reined in my horse, waiting for Calloway, and rode with him at the head of his battery. I had scarcely joined him, when Colonels Fairfax and Latrobe, of Longstreet's staff, and Captain Simonton, of Pickett's, dashed by, splendidly mounted, and disappeared in a body of woods but a few hundred yards ahead. Hardly had they done so, when pop! pop! pop! went a half dozen carbines and revolvers; and a moment later the three officers galloped back out of the forest, driving before them two or three Federal cavalrymen on foot-Simonton leaning over his horse's head and striking at them with his riding whip. On the instant I took my revenge, r
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