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Chapter 21: Cold Harbor of 1864. The great fight of June 3d unparalleled in brevity, in slaughter, and in disproportion of loss Grant assaults in column, or in mass his troops refuse to renew the attack effect at the North Confederate works in the Campaign of 1864 the lines sharpshooting the covered way the spring death of Captain McCarthy, of the Howitzers how it occurred on the lines how it was received in the city my brother Loses an eye alone in the world a last look at the enemy buildings felled and scattered by artillery gun wheels cut down by musketry bronze guns Splotched and Pitted like smallpox epitome of the Campaign of 1864 maneuvering of no avail against Lee's Army did that Army make Lee, or Lee that Army? There were two battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaughter. It is un
ome of the Campaign of 1864 maneuvering of no avail against Lee's Army did that Army make Lee, or Lee that Army? There were two battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful sla1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaughter. It is undisputed that both McClellan's army and Grant's outnumbered Lee's,--Grant's overwhelmingly,--and it is asserted that the position occupied by the Federals in 1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twe1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twelve days; the battle proper did not last perhaps that many minutes. In some respects, at least, it was one of the notable battles of history-certainly in its brevity measured in time, and its length measured in slaughter — as also in the disproportion of the losses. A fair epitome of it in these respects would be that in a few m
-and yet he failed utterly to turn it. The figures here used are those of Col. Walter Taylor, and are less favorable to Lee than those of most of the Confederate authorities upon the war. General Early, for example, says that Lee, at the outset, had less than 50,000 effectives of all arms under his command. It is not my purpose to accentuate this contrast in any unfair or unpleasant way, and yet an intelligent soldier of the Army of Northern Virginia, who fought at Chancellorsville in 1863, and again from the Rapidan to Cold Harbor in 1864, cannot but set opposite to the picture just sketched that of Lee holding the front of Hooker's 92,000 with scant 14,000 muskets, while with about one-third (1-3) his numbers he utterly crushed in the right flank and rear of Hooker's great host. It should not be forgotten in this connection, and in endeavoring to form a just estimate of Lee's operations throughout this campaign of 1864, that in the death of Jackson, Lee had lost his great of
Chapter 21: Cold Harbor of 1864. The great fight of June 3d unparalleled in brevity, in battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaby the Federals in 1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twelve days; the battle proas we began regularly to do in this campaign of 1864, particularly at Cold Harbor. Something of thithree life and death pictures of Cold Harbor of 1864. The reader may recall our Old Doctor, the salient features and results of the campaign of 1864, from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor, inclusive,3, and again from the Rapidan to Cold Harbor in 1864, cannot but set opposite to the picture just skof Lee's operations throughout this campaign of 1864, that in the death of Jackson, Lee had lost his
June 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 21
l side was not then generally known or appreciated by us, namely, that Grant had attacked in column, in phalanx, or in mass. The record of the Official Diary of our corps (Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. VII., p. 503), under date of June 3, 1864, i. very peculiar and is in part in these words: Meantime the enemy is heavily massed in front of Kershaw's salient. Anderson's, Law's, and Gregg's brigades are there to support Kershaw. Assault after assault is made, and each time repulsed d to obey, and that at least some of Grant's corps generals approved of this refusal of their men to repeat the useless sacrifice. Here, then, is the secret of the otherwise inexplicable and incredible butchery. A little after daylight on June 3, 1864, along the lines of Kershaw's salient, his infantry discharged their bullets and his artillery fired case-shot and doubleshotted canister, at very short range, into a mass of men twenty-eight (28) deep, who could neither advance nor retreat,
arbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaughter. It is undisputed that both McClellan's army and Grant's outnumbered Lee's,--Grant's overwhelmingly,--and it is asserted that the position occupied by the Federals in 1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twelve days; the battle proper did not last perhaps that many minutes. In some respects, at least, it was one of the notable battles of history-certainly in its brevity measured in time, and its length measured in slaughter — as also in the disproportion of the losses. A fair epitome of it in these respects would be that in a few moments more than thirteen thousand men were killed and wounded on the Federal side and less than thirteen hundred on the Confederate. As to the time cons
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