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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
s in 1845, and Mexico threatening to invade Texas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of the United States. He proceeded with all his available force, about one thousand five hundred, to Corpus Christi. There he was joined by reinforcements of regulars and volunteers. Discussion had arisen as to whether the Nueces or the Rio Grande was the proper boundary of Texas. His political opinions, whatever they might be, were subordinate to the dnt recognized the fact that Texas had been admitted into the Union with the Rio Grande as her boundary; and General Taylor was instructed to advance to the river. His force had been increased to 4,000, when, on March 8, 1846, he marched from Corpus Christi. He was of course conscious of the inadequacy of his division to resist such an army as Mexico might send against it; but, when ordered by superior authority, it was not for him to remonstrate. General Gaines, commanding the Western Divisi
Fort Erie (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
l conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the purpose it commemorates, that
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 21
War countermanded them, except as to such as had already joined. General Taylor, after making a depot at Point Isabel, advanced to the bank of the Rio Grande, opposite Matamoras, and there threw up an intrenchment, mounted field-guns, and made general provision for the defence of the place-Fort Brown. Leaving a garrison to hold it, he marched, with an aggregate force of 2,288, to obtain the necessary additional supplies from Point Isabel, about three miles distant. General Arista, the new Mexican commander, availing himself of the opportunity, crossed the river with an estimated force of 6,000 regular troops, ten pieces of artillery, and a considerable amount of auxiliaries. In the afternoon of the second day's march from Point Isabel, these were reported by General Taylor's cavalry to occupy the road in his front. He halted at a water-hole to allow the command to rest, and for the needful disposition for battle. In the evening a request was made that a council of war should be h
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
there had been inconsistency on the part of Southern men in treating this question. Who are those, he asked, that arraign the South, imputing to us motives of sectional aggrandizement? Generally, the same who resisted Texan annexation, and most eagerly press on the immediate occupation of the whole of Oregon. The source is worthy the suspicion. These were the men whose constitutional scruples resisted the admission of a country gratuitously offered to us, but now look forward to gaining Canada by conquest. These are the same who claim a weight to balance Texas, while they attack others as governed by sectional considerations. He repudiated for his people this doctrine of a political balance between different sections of the Union. It is not, he contended, of Southern growth. We advocate the annexation of Texas as a great national measure; we saw in it the extension of the principles intrusted to our care. And if, in the progress of the question, it assumed a sectional h
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
inally the war, long threatened, had been in due form declared between the United States and Mexico. As the summer advanced the dreadful call came from Mississippi for Mr. Davis to command the First Mississippi regiment, which was organized at Vicksburg, and had elected him the colonel. He eagerly and gladly accepted. There were no telegraphs and few railways in those days. The notification was brought to Washington by a special messenger, his friend Colonel James Roach, of Vicksburg, Miss.Vicksburg, Miss., who delivered it to Mr. Davis in the latter part of June, 1846. Then began hurried preparations for our departure for Mississippi. The President had been authorized to appoint two major-generals and four brigadier-generals, in addition to the present military establishment, and he intimated to Mr. Davis that he should like to make him one of them. My husband expressed his preference for an elective office; when pressed, he said that he thought volunteer troops raised in a State should be
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 21
r. Davis, many years after his active life had closed, wrote: Texas having been annexed to the United States in 1845, and Mexico threatening to invade Texas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of he marched from Corpus Christi. He was of course conscious of the inadequacy of his division to resist such an army as Mexico might send against it; but, when ordered by superior authority, it was not for him to remonstrate. General Gaines, commaencroached can be somewhat marked by this incident, which occurred in Congress at the time the first hostilities began in Mexico. Finally the war, long threatened, had been in due form declared between the United States and Mexico. As the summerMexico. As the summer advanced the dreadful call came from Mississippi for Mr. Davis to command the First Mississippi regiment, which was organized at Vicksburg, and had elected him the colonel. He eagerly and gladly accepted. There were no telegraphs and few railways
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
than to restrain excitement-than to oppose a policy that threatens an unnecessary war? . . . The history of Mississippi, brief as it is, relieves me from the necessity of pledging her services to our Union in the hour of its need. But the marked omission of the gentleman from Missouri requires my attention. In recounting the services of the past, as earnest for the future, he gave to every neighboring name a place, but left out Mississippi; passed over it unheeded in his transit from Alabama to New Orleans. Sir, let me tell him that Mississippi's sons bled freely in the Creek campaign, and were leaders at Pensacola; further, let me tell him that, when they heard of an invading foe upon the coast of Louisiana, the spirit was so general to sally forth and meet him at the outer gate, that our Governor issued orders to restrain their going; and on the field to which he has so specially alluded — the battle of New Orleans --Mississippi dragoons, led by our gallant Hinds, performed
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
onquest. These are the same who claim a weight to balance Texas, while they attack others as governed by sectional considerntended, of Southern growth. We advocate the annexation of Texas as a great national measure; we saw in it the extension of Davis, many years after his active life had closed, wrote: Texas having been annexed to the United States in 1845, and Mexico threatening to invade Texas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of tTexas as a part of the United States. He proceeded with all his available force, about one thousand five hundred, to Corpus Christi. There he wher the Nueces or the Rio Grande was the proper boundary of Texas. His political opinions, whatever they might be, were suboegm of Decatur, My country; right or wrong, my country. Texas claimed protection for her frontier; the President recognized the fact that Texas had been admitted into the Union with the Rio Grande as her boundary; and General Taylor was instructe
Saratoga, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ded our federative creed, opposed to the idea of sectional conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
riot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the purpose it commemorates, that column rises stern, even severe, in its simplicity; neither niche nor moulding for parasite or creeping thing to rest on; composed of material that defies the waves of time, and pointing like a finger to the sources of noblest thought. Beacon of freedom, it guides the present generation to retrace the fountain of our years and stand beside its source; to contemplate the scene where Massachusetts and Virginia, as stronger brothers of the family, stood foremost to defend our common rights. Remembrance of the petty jarrings of to-day are buried in the nobler friendship of an earlier time. Yes, sir, and when ignorance, led by fanatic hate, and armed by all uncharitableness, assails a domestic institution of the South, I try to forgive, for the sake of the righteous among the wicked — our natural allies, the Democracy of the North. Thus, sir, I leave to silent contempt the mal
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