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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Mr. Davis to command the First Mississippi regiment, which was organized at Vicksburg, and had elected him the colonel. He eagerly and gladly accepted. There were no telegraphs and few railways in those days. The notification was brought to Washington by a special messenger, his friend Colonel James Roach, of Vicksburg, Miss., who delivered it to Mr. Davis in the latter part of June, 1846. Then began hurried preparations for our departure for Mississippi. The President had been authorizpi Rifles. He said that these would be more effective in the hands of our men than any other arms, as they were all used to hunting, and most of them had either a rifle or a double-barrelled shot-gun, and were good marksmen. Before leaving Washington for the scene of hostilities, Mr. Davis had an interview with General Scott. It may be interesting to state, said Mr. Davis in 1889, that General Scott endeavored to persuade me not to take more rifles than enough for four companies, and ob
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ommittee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire into the expediency of converting a portion of the forts of the United States into schools for military instruction, on the basis of substituting their present garrisons of enlisted men by detachered over the country Mr. Davis, many years after his active life had closed, wrote: Texas having been annexed to the United States in 1845, and Mexico threatening to invade Texas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of the United States. He proceeded with all his available force, about one thousand five hundred, to Corpus Christi. There he was joined by reinforcements of regulars and volunteers. Discussion had arisen as to whether the Nhe first hostilities began in Mexico. Finally the war, long threatened, had been in due form declared between the United States and Mexico. As the summer advanced the dreadful call came from Mississippi for Mr. Davis to command the First Missis
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
brief as it is, relieves me from the necessity of pledging her services to our Union in the hour of its need. But the marked omission of the gentleman from Missouri requires my attention. In recounting the services of the past, as earnest for the future, he gave to every neighboring name a place, but left out Mississippi; passed over it unheeded in his transit from Alabama to New Orleans. Sir, let me tell him that Mississippi's sons bled freely in the Creek campaign, and were leaders at Pensacola; further, let me tell him that, when they heard of an invading foe upon the coast of Louisiana, the spirit was so general to sally forth and meet him at the outer gate, that our Governor issued orders to restrain their going; and on the field to which he has so specially alluded — the battle of New Orleans --Mississippi dragoons, led by our gallant Hinds, performed that feat which the commanding general announced as the admiration of one army and the wonder of the other. Sir, I will only
James Roach (search for this): chapter 21
tilities began in Mexico. Finally the war, long threatened, had been in due form declared between the United States and Mexico. As the summer advanced the dreadful call came from Mississippi for Mr. Davis to command the First Mississippi regiment, which was organized at Vicksburg, and had elected him the colonel. He eagerly and gladly accepted. There were no telegraphs and few railways in those days. The notification was brought to Washington by a special messenger, his friend Colonel James Roach, of Vicksburg, Miss., who delivered it to Mr. Davis in the latter part of June, 1846. Then began hurried preparations for our departure for Mississippi. The President had been authorized to appoint two major-generals and four brigadier-generals, in addition to the present military establishment, and he intimated to Mr. Davis that he should like to make him one of them. My husband expressed his preference for an elective office; when pressed, he said that he thought volunteer tro
John Brown (search for this): chapter 21
hem with his squadron of dragoons. The gunners were cut down at their pieces, the commanding officer was captured, and the infantry soon thereafter made the victory decisive. The enemy's loss, in the two battles, was estimated at i,000; Taylor's killed, 49. The Mexicans precipitately recrossed the Rio Grande, completely routed, leaving on the field the usual marks of defeat and rout. He then proceeded to Fort Brown. During his absence it had been heavily bombarded, and the commander, Major Brown, had been killed. On the 28th the House resolved itself into Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, to take up the joint resolutions, tendering the thanks of Congress to General Taylor and the army of occupation for recent brilliant services on the Rio Grande. On May 29th a skirmish opened between two men, for each of whom the future had in store the highest political responsibilities and honors. These men came from the same section. They coincided on the leading war
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 21
ers and personal character. One was Mr. Jefferson Davis, the other was Mr. Andrew Johnson. Mr. Davis, in supporting the resolution, had protested against the unjust criticisms on the army antailor could have secured the same results? Mr. Davis mentioned these two trades at random not kno, to do honor to his class of mechanics. Mr. Davis had named two of the trades of civil life, hl Mr. Johnson's subsequent animosity against Mr. Davis. When Mr. Davis sprung up all aglow withMr. Davis sprung up all aglow with indignation, and with as much fervor as eloquence, paid this tribute to his Alma Mater, and put a the dreadful call came from Mississippi for Mr. Davis to command the First Mississippi regiment, wch, of Vicksburg, Miss., who delivered it to Mr. Davis in the latter part of June, 1846. Then bega military establishment, and he intimated to Mr. Davis that he should like to make him one of them.ing Washington for the scene of hostilities, Mr. Davis had an interview with General Scott. It [2 more...]
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 21
exas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of tn with the Rio Grande as her boundary; and General Taylor was instructed to advance to the river. H a sufficient number of volunteers to join General Taylor, but the Secretary of War countermanded th from Point Isabel, these were reported by General Taylor's cavalry to occupy the road in his front. a council of war should be held, to which General Taylor assented. At the meeting it was developeed until night, when the enemy retired and General Taylor bivouacked on the field. Early in the morning of May 9th General Taylor resumed his forward march, and in the afternoon encountered the enemysition, with artillery advantageously posted. Taylor's infantry pushed through the chaparral linings, in the two battles, was estimated at i,000; Taylor's killed, 49. The Mexicans precipitately recrtions, tendering the thanks of Congress to General Taylor and the army of occupation for recent bril[1 more...]
in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the purpose it commemorates, that column rises stern, even severe, in its simplicity; neither niche nor moulding for parasite or creeping thing to rest on; composed of material that defies the waves of time, and pointing like a finger to the sources of noblest thought. Beacon of freedom, it guides the present generation to retrace the fountain of our years and stand beside its source; to contemplate
Alma Mater (search for this): chapter 21
f civil life, he said, but in doing so he had no desire to attack any particular class. His opinion was simply that war, like other knowledge, must be acquired. Nothing was more manifest throughout this debate than the courtesy of one party to it, unless it was the demagogism of the other. From this debate arose all Mr. Johnson's subsequent animosity against Mr. Davis. When Mr. Davis sprung up all aglow with indignation, and with as much fervor as eloquence, paid this tribute to his Alma Mater, and put a lance in rest for her, Joshua Giddings raised his gaunt form, put his hand behind his ear and listened. Ex-President John Quincy Adams crossed over from the other side of the chamber and took a seat near enough to hear. Mr. Adams was a rather thick-set, short man, with irregular features; he had small, but bright, intense eyes; his head was large and entirely destitute of hair, and when excited it became a glowing red; his eyebrows assumed a pointed arch, and his mobile, rathe
Joshua Giddings (search for this): chapter 21
this debate arose all Mr. Johnson's subsequent animosity against Mr. Davis. When Mr. Davis sprung up all aglow with indignation, and with as much fervor as eloquence, paid this tribute to his Alma Mater, and put a lance in rest for her, Joshua Giddings raised his gaunt form, put his hand behind his ear and listened. Ex-President John Quincy Adams crossed over from the other side of the chamber and took a seat near enough to hear. Mr. Adams was a rather thick-set, short man, with irregulamember he listened attentively once, and never again, unless pleased. Mr. Adams, when the debate was over, arose and said to one of the other members, We shall hear more of that young man, I fancy. While these amenities were at their height, Mr. Giddings showed a full set of gleaming teeth, and evidently enjoyed the little impromptu debate, not caring which got the worst of it. He seemed to think the slave-holders were given over to each other, and was willing to let them alone. On March II
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