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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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J. W. Davis (search for this): chapter 7
to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medicately could find none. Major Huse was sent to Europe, on the third day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there. He found few serviceable arms on the marknd destroy the commerce of a separate nation, but to subdue insurrection. Mr. Davis wrote of the false presentation of the case to foreign governments made by Mr No one who scrutinizes impartially the history of this stirring period of Mr. Davis's life can fail to observe the activity with which he pressed every availablemoved the masses at the North, the Confederate Congress was still in session; Mr. Davis, who had never underestimated our peril, issued a proclamation calling on theadquarters in that State. Anxiety and unremitting labor had prostrated President Davis; and, when he left Montgomery, it was upon his bed. His mails were heavy
Lucius B. Northrop (search for this): chapter 7
fore they were aware it was to be conferred. The order of their rank was: General Samuel Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. When General A. S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of Virginia, learned for the first time his increased rank. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. Meyers was appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medica of the South, supplemented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, which were unfortunately scarce and especially needful for the hospitals in the field. General Gorgas was appointed Chief of Ordnance, and i
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
enged either for efficiency or zeal, were all so indifferent to any question of personal interest that they had received their appointment before they were aware it was to be conferred. The order of their rank was: General Samuel Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. When General A. S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of VirgGeneral A. S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of Virginia, learned for the first time his increased rank. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. Meyers was appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir of his service, and Mr. Davis could not notice it in extenso. Surgeon-General Moore, from the Materia Medica of the South, supplemented the lack of drugs made contraband of war, and by the aid of his own ingenuity and that of his corps, supplied the surgical instruments, whi
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 7
e United States army, or to which they had been elected or appointed in their State. The right of the States to confer the grade of colonel was secured; a higher grade might be by selection. The three highest officers of the Confederate army, whose fame stands unchallenged either for efficiency or zeal, were all so indifferent to any question of personal interest that they had received their appointment before they were aware it was to be conferred. The order of their rank was: General Samuel Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. When General A. S. Johnston was assigned to the West, he for the first time asked and learned what relative position he would serve. General Lee, in like manner, when he was assigned to duty beyond the limits of Virginia, learned for the first time his increased rank. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. Meyers was appointed Quartermaster-General; Captain L. B. Northrop was appointed to command the Subsistence Department. He made no memoir o
table for defensive and offensive use, but unfortunately could find none. Major Huse was sent to Europe, on the third day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there. He found few serviceable arms on the market, but made such extensive contracts that, to bring them through the blockade, was after this the only difficulty encountered. In the shop of the Government gun repairers was a musket from the Tower of London, made in 1762; it might have been fired in the Revolutionary war of 1776, taken part in the Indian wars, in the war of 1812, in the Indian wars of 1836 and 1837, in the Mexican war of 1845, and last in the war between the States. The appropriations for the Navy had for years been mainly spent upon the Northern navy-yards, notwithstanding that much of the timber used had been from the South. We had not the accessories for building vessels with the necessary celerity; we had no powder depots, and no store of it on hand, no saltpetre, and only the store of sulp
ately could find none. Major Huse was sent to Europe, on the third day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there. He found few serviceable arms on the market, but made such extensive contracts that, to bring them through the blockade, was after this the only difficulty encountered. In the shop of the Government gun repairers was a musket from the Tower of London, made in 1762; it might have been fired in the Revolutionary war of 1776, taken part in the Indian wars, in the war of 1812, in the Indian wars of 1836 and 1837, in the Mexican war of 1845, and last in the war between the States. The appropriations for the Navy had for years been mainly spent upon the Northern navy-yards, notwithstanding that much of the timber used had been from the South. We had not the accessories for building vessels with the necessary celerity; we had no powder depots, and no store of it on hand, no saltpetre, and only the store of sulphur needful for clarifying the cane-sugar crop.
rd day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there. He found few serviceable arms on the market, but made such extensive contracts that, to bring them through the blockade, was after this the only difficulty encountered. In the shop of the Government gun repairers was a musket from the Tower of London, made in 1762; it might have been fired in the Revolutionary war of 1776, taken part in the Indian wars, in the war of 1812, in the Indian wars of 1836 and 1837, in the Mexican war of 1845, and last in the war between the States. The appropriations for the Navy had for years been mainly spent upon the Northern navy-yards, notwithstanding that much of the timber used had been from the South. We had not the accessories for building vessels with the necessary celerity; we had no powder depots, and no store of it on hand, no saltpetre, and only the store of sulphur needful for clarifying the cane-sugar crop. General G. W. Rains was appointed to establish a manufactory of
April 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
perience and zeal which achieved a triumph that will be long remembered. The powder of the Confederate mills, under all the disadvantages that surrounded him, was recognized to be the best in the world. On April 19, 1861, President Lincoln proclaimed a blockade, not as the effort to embarrass and destroy the commerce of a separate nation, but to subdue insurrection. Mr. Davis wrote of the false presentation of the case to foreign governments made by Mr. Seward: As late as April 22, 1861, Mr. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, in a despatch to Mr. Dayton, Minister to France, since made public, expressed the views and purposes of the United States Government in the premises as follows. It may be proper to explain that, by what he is pleased to term the Revolution, Mr. Seward means the withdrawal of the Southern States; and that the words italicized are, perhaps, not so distinguished in the original. He wrote: The Territories will remain in all respects the sa
r Huse was sent to Europe, on the third day after Mr. Davis's inauguration, to buy arms there. He found few serviceable arms on the market, but made such extensive contracts that, to bring them through the blockade, was after this the only difficulty encountered. In the shop of the Government gun repairers was a musket from the Tower of London, made in 1762; it might have been fired in the Revolutionary war of 1776, taken part in the Indian wars, in the war of 1812, in the Indian wars of 1836 and 1837, in the Mexican war of 1845, and last in the war between the States. The appropriations for the Navy had for years been mainly spent upon the Northern navy-yards, notwithstanding that much of the timber used had been from the South. We had not the accessories for building vessels with the necessary celerity; we had no powder depots, and no store of it on hand, no saltpetre, and only the store of sulphur needful for clarifying the cane-sugar crop. General G. W. Rains was app
May 20th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
mand or the possibility of arming them. It was shown that if the Government had possessed arms enough for the entire adult white population of the Confederacy, they could have been enrolled at this time. Notwithstanding that men have railed long and loudly over volunteers having been refused, they knew at the time that, having no weapons with which to arm them, to accept their services was but to cripple the industries of the country without increasing the ranks of our defenders. On May 20, 1861, the Congress resolved that the seat of Government of the Confederate States should be transferred from Montgomery to Richmond, and that it should adjourn to meet there on July 20th. It had already become evident that Virginia would be the battle-ground of the coming struggle, and it was desirable, therefore, that the Confederate Government should have its headquarters in that State. Anxiety and unremitting labor had prostrated President Davis; and, when he left Montgomery, it was up
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