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m our center was the signal for the attack. The Commanding-General desired that the movement should be made with the least possible delay. It was now 2½ o'clock P. M. Two of the brigades had to march about two miles, the other two about one mile. Brigadier-General Pillow, having reported for duty, was assigned by the Commanding-General to Palmer's brigade, and that fine officer resumed command of his regiment, and was three times wounded in the ensuing engagement. The Ninth Kentucky and Cobbs' battery, under the command of Colonel Hunt, were left to hold the hill so often referred to. The division, after deducting the losses of Wednesday, the troops left on the hill and companies on special service, consisted of some 4,500 men. It was drawn up in two lines, the first in a narrow skirt of woods, the second two hundred yards in rear. Pillow and Hanson formed the first line, Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supporte
R. L. Gibson (search for this): chapter 3.14
ollowing reports of the battle of Murfreesboroa by the lamented Breckinridge and the gallant General Gibson: Report of General J. C. Breckinridge.headquarters Breckinridge's division, January--ms having received a wound while gallantly leading his brigade, the command devolved upon Colonel R. L. Gibson, who discharged its duties throughout with marked courage and skill. Preston and Palmefirst line, Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the second line under orders to moveully, your obedient servant, John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A. Report of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps, A. T., Tullahdevoted soldiers. A reference to the list of casualties will show the heavy loss sustained in this action. I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant, R. L. Gibson, Colonel Commanding.
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 3.14
is casualties amounted to one hundred and fifty-five. The Twentieth Tennessee, after driving the enemy on the right of the turnpike and taking twenty-five prisoners, was compelled to fall back before a very heavy artillery and musketry fire, Colonel Smith, commanding, being severely wounded; but it kept the prisoners and soon rejoined the command. The Fourth Florida and Sixtieth North Carolina encountered serious difficulty at a burnt house (Cowan's) on the left of the turnpike from fences anergeant-Major John Farrell, great credit is due for their disregard of personal danger and soldierly conduct. We moved to the rear of our artillery and were no longer, on that day, under the infantry fire of the enemy. Lieutenants Hepburn and Smith were killed in this action — they were brave and devoted soldiers. A reference to the list of casualties will show the heavy loss sustained in this action. I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant, R. L. Gibson, Colonel Commanding
Willie Pegram (search for this): chapter 3.14
heir for mations on the west bank of the river. On the morning of Wednesday the 31st, the battle opened on our left. From my front information came to me from Pegram's cavalry force in advance that the enemy, having crossed at the fords below, were moving on my position in line of battle. This proved to be incorrect. Aboudoing this I was to bring up the artillery and establish it on the crest, so as at once to hold it and enfilade the enemy's lines on the other side of the river. Pegram and Wharton, who, with some cavalry and a battery, were beyond the point where my right would rest when the new line of battle should be formed, were directed, ashe summit of the slope as soon as the infantry should rout the enemy. Feeling anxious about my right, I sent two staff officers in succession to communicate with Pegram and Wharton, but received no intelligence up to the moment of assault. The interval between my left and the troops on the hill was already too great, but I had a
ief loss fell upon Preston's right and center. His casualties amounted to one hundred and fifty-five. The Twentieth Tennessee, after driving the enemy on the right of the turnpike and taking twenty-five prisoners, was compelled to fall back before a very heavy artillery and musketry fire, Colonel Smith, commanding, being severely wounded; but it kept the prisoners and soon rejoined the command. The Fourth Florida and Sixtieth North Carolina encountered serious difficulty at a burnt house (Cowan's) on the left of the turnpike from fences and other obstacles, and was for a little while thrown into some confusion. Here for several minutes they were exposed to a destructive and partially enfilading fire at short range of artillery and infantry. But they were soon rallied by their gallant brigade commander, and rushing with cheers across the intervening space, entered the cedar glade. The enemy had retired from the cedars and was in position in a field to the front and right. By c
iver near the ford. The right of Major-General Withers of Lieutenant-General Polk's corps, rested near the left bank of the river and slight Commanding to send at least one brigade to the support of Lieutenant-General Polk, who was hard pressed, and as I recollect, two, if I could and with the remainder of my command to report at once to Lieutenant-General Polk. The brigades of Preston and Palmer were immediately moveard to the position occupied by the General Commanding and Lieutenant-General Polk, near the west bank of the river and a little below the foling from a very hot fire of the enemy. I was directed by Lieutenant-General Polk to form my line with its right resting on the river and it my staff, assisted by gentlemen of the staffs of Generals Bragg and Polk, to rally and form Adams' brigade, which was falling back chiefly beeston and Palmer being now in line — Preston on the right--Lieutenant-General Polk directed me to advance across the plain until I encountere
ort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Ninth Kentucky, Forty-first Alabama, and Cobb's battery, all under the command of Colonel Hunt, formed a special rear-guard. The enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A. Report of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps, A. T., Tullahoma, January 11th, 1863. Colonel T. O'Hara, A. A. A. G.: Sir: I beg leave to submit the following report of the part taken by the Thirteenth L
Roger Tammure (search for this): chapter 3.14
been mentioned in every report of various battles in which the regiment has been engaged-Shiloh, Farmington, Perryville — and having lost his leg in this action, I would especially commend him to the favorable consideration of our superior officers. To Captains King, Bishop, and Ryan, the praise of having borne them themselves with great efficiency and marked courage is especially due. Adjutant Hugh H. Bein acted with becoming coolness and efficiency, and to the color-bearer, Sergeant Roger Tammure, and Sergeant-Major John Farrell, great credit is due for their disregard of personal danger and soldierly conduct. We moved to the rear of our artillery and were no longer, on that day, under the infantry fire of the enemy. Lieutenants Hepburn and Smith were killed in this action — they were brave and devoted soldiers. A reference to the list of casualties will show the heavy loss sustained in this action. I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant, R. L. Gibson, C
nspector-General (horse shot); Captain Semple, ordnance officer; Lieutenant Darragh, severely wounded. Captains Martin and Coleman, of my volunteer staff, were active and efficient. The former had his horse killed under him. 217 Drs. Heustis and Pendleton, Chief Surgeon and Medical Inspector, were unremitting in attention to the wounded. Dr. Stanhope Breckinridge, Assistant Surgeon, accompanied my headquarters, and pursued his duties through the fire of Wednesday. Mr. Buckner and Mr. Zantzinger, of Kentucky, attached themselves to me for the oocasion and were active and zealous. Captain Blackburn, commanding my escort, ever cool and vigilant, rendered essential service, and made several bold reconnoisances. Charles Choutard of the escort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Nin
J. C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 3.14
ng reports of the battle of Murfreesboroa by the lamented Breckinridge and the gallant General Gibson: Report of General J. C. Breckinridge.headquarters Breckinridge's division, January--, 1863. Major T. B. Roy, A. A. Gen.: sir: I have the honor to report the operations of this division of Lieutenant-General Hardee's cor the enemy had taken shelter. At the same time, accompanied by Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, and Major Wilson, Colonel O'Hara, and Lieutenant Breckinridge of my own, I proceeded towards the left of our line of skirmishers, which passed through a thick wood about 500 yards in front of Hanson's position and ex name Lieutenant-Colonel Buckner, A. A. G., who was absent on leave, but returned upon the first rumor of battle; Colonel O'Hara, Acting Adjutant-General; Lieutenant Breckinridge, Aide-de-Camp; Major Graves, Chief of Artillery (twice wounded, and his horse shot under him); Major Wilson, Assistant Inspector-General (horse shot); Cap
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