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Yankee Doodle (search for this): chapter 40
ight light of a waning moon, from General Banks's headquarters; and I heard the voice of Colonel Irwin eagerly inquiring for the tent of General Augur--the whole camp being in calm repose. The few who were awake wondered, of course, what all this could mean; and what it did the official correspondence will best explain. At the earliest dawn of the — now ever memorable--ninth July, the whole camp was necessarily in the highest state of glee and commotion, and the Star-spangled banner, Yankee Doodle, and Dixie came borne upon the morning air — never sounding sweeter. At seven o'clock, General Andrews, Chief of the Staff of General Banks, made his grand entrance into the rebel fortifications, with Colonel Birge leading his brave storming column, whose noble services have thus been, happily for their friends, dispensed with; but to whom the country is no less indebted — taking the will for the deed. These were followed by two picked regiments from each division, with Holcomb's and<
Eugene Mack (search for this): chapter 40
hey been impregnable elsewhere. Far down in the bowels of the lofty bluffs they had dug deep recesses, approached by steps cut out of the earth, and here their magazines were placed quite safe — owing to the enormous thickness of earth above — from any projectiles that could be sent against them. One or two quaker guns were found. On the fortifications to the land side, every thing told of the terrible efficiency of our artillery, which never did its work better. Foremost among these were Mack's, Holcomb's, and Rawle's batteries, the Indiana battery, and the naval battery of heavy guns, under the gallant Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond, and his fine crew, who sent desolation along with every shot from their large pieces. The effect was, that soon after we began bombarding in earnest, every gun upon the front batteries was silenced; and they have so remained for weeks since; any one they replaced being knocked over as soon as we got the range of it. In speaking of how much we owe
happening to meet a rebel colonel, he told him the fact and showed him the document. I'm not a betting man, said the colonel, and don't know that you are, but I will bet you an even hundred that this is not so. Done, said Nelson; I have not one hundred dollars with me, but here is my gold watch as a stake. The watch and the one hundred dollars were put into the hands of another rebel officer and taken into Port Hudson; and this before there were any symptoms of Gardner's surrender Colonel Van Pettin, one of the storming party, happening to come up with a similar notice to Nelson's in his pocket, the rebel colonel seemed inclined to back out of his bet, but Colonel Nelson held him to it, and has, since the surrender of Port Hudson, received back his watch and the hundred dollars, in confederate notes — worth nothing to him, of course, but little pictorial mementoes of a curious event of the war. I have no doubt whatever that it was this little sporting transaction which first gave
ack's, Holcomb's, and Rawle's batteries, the Indiana battery, and the naval battery of heavy guns, under the gallant Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond, and his fine crew, who sent desolation along with every shot from their large pieces. The effect e must not forget that in this work on land the sailors took a very important part. The marine battery, directed by Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond — the same who so conspicuously distinguished himself in the grand attack upon Port Hudson — and tho gun to stand against them. At this juncture came out General Banks's call for a storming party of one thousand. Lieutenant Terry was among the foremost of the volunteers. Owing, however, to the assault being delayed, and Captain Alden, of the Richmond, having left on account of ill-health, Lieutenant Terry was commanded to return to his vessel. Though disappointed in his aim, his bravery was none the less conspicuous. Nothing can be more amusing than the notion the rebels seem to have
J. O. Nelson (search for this): chapter 40
. News having reached us on the seventh instant of the fall of Vicksburgh, Colonel Nelson, commanding the colored regiment on our right, received official intelligence of the same from his commander, General Grover. It appears that Colonel Nelson's approaches upon the enemy had got so very close-only twenty feet apart — that, had gone on for three days, hourly expecting the order for an assault. When Nelson got his delightful information, happening to meet a rebel colonel, he told him you are, but I will bet you an even hundred that this is not so. Done, said Nelson; I have not one hundred dollars with me, but here is my gold watch as a stake. ettin, one of the storming party, happening to come up with a similar notice to Nelson's in his pocket, the rebel colonel seemed inclined to back out of his bet, but Colonel Nelson held him to it, and has, since the surrender of Port Hudson, received back his watch and the hundred dollars, in confederate notes — worth nothing to h
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 40
country will be glad to know that it is so, and that if they cannot afford champagne to their brave prisoners, they at least show them the same polite attentions and allow them the same latitude of visiting families in the neighborhood. It will be equally satisfactory to know that this lovely spirit of humanity and chivalry does not exist alone at Richmond, but among the chivalrous cut-throats of Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. The rebels hung Colonel Montgomery in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissances in force to that effect, on the twenty-seventh May and fourteenth June,
July 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 40
ed, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. Dwight, Brigadier-General. G. W. Steedman, Colonel Commanding Left Wing of the Army. Marshal J. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Artillery. Henry W. Birge, Colonel Commanding Fifth Brigade, Glover's Division. N. P. Banks, Major-General. Frank Gardner, Major-General. A National account. headquarters Port Hudson, Thursday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have informed you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until all resistance would be useless. Some — where about midnight of the seventh, a Lieutenant of Holcomb's battery came to the tent of Major-General Augur's Assistant Adjutant-General, and said that the enemy were sounding a bugle, which foreboded he knew not what. Shortly afterward another came to say that they had sent out a flag of truce
eneral, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Frank Gardner, Major-General Commanding C. S. Forces. headquarters Department of the Gulf, before Port Hudson, July 8. To Major-General Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces, Port Hudson: General: In reply to your communication dated the seventh instant, by flag of truce receent to a cessation of hostilities for the purpose you indicate. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, N. P. Banks, Major-General Commanding. Port Hudson, July 8. To Major-General Banks, Commanding U. S. Forces: General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date, giving a copy of an this purpose? I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces. headquarters United States forces, before Port Hudson July 8. To Major-General Frank Gardner, Commanding G. S. Forces, Port Hudson: General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date,
Doc. 38.-capture of Port Hudson. Official correspondence. headquarters of the nineteenth army corps, Department of the Gulf, Port Hudson, July 9. General: I have the honor to inform you that Port Hudson surrendered yesterday morning without conditions. We took possession at seven o'clock this morning. The number of prisoners and guns is unknown as yet, but is estimated at five thousand prisoners and fifty pieces of artillery. Very respectfully, Brigadier-General W. H. Emory, Cnt of General Augur--the whole camp being in calm repose. The few who were awake wondered, of course, what all this could mean; and what it did the official correspondence will best explain. At the earliest dawn of the — now ever memorable--ninth July, the whole camp was necessarily in the highest state of glee and commotion, and the Star-spangled banner, Yankee Doodle, and Dixie came borne upon the morning air — never sounding sweeter. At seven o'clock, General Andrews, Chief of the Staf
nd Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissances in force to that effect, on the twenty-seventh May and fourteenth June, General Banks showed great judgment and humanity in not attempting it again until he had fully invested the place by a series of irresistible approaches. His wisdom in this matter is proved not only by the very difficult nature of the ground we found within the fortification — full of deep and impenetrable ravines, where a very small force could oppose a large one--but by the testimony of Gardner himself. It is really pleasurable to look back now and see how much blood has been sav
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