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neral Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces, Port Hudson: General: In reply to your communication dated the seventh instant, by flag of truce received a few moments since, I have the honor to inform you that I received yesterday morning, July seventh, at forty-five minutes past ten o'clock, by the gunboat General Price, an official despatch from Major-General Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. army, whereof the following is a true extract: headquarters Department of the Tennessee, near Vicksburgh, July 4. To Major-General N. P. Banks, Commanding Department of the Gulf: General: The garrison of Vicksburgh surrendered this morning. The number of prisoners, as given by the officers, is twenty-seven thousand; field artillery, one hundred and twenty-eight pieces; and a large number of siege-guns, probably not less than eighty. Your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Major-General. I regret to say, that under present circumstances, I cannot, consistently with my duty, consent to a cessatio
ieces of artillery. Very respectfully, Brigadier-General W. H. Emory, Commanding Defences of New-Orleans. Richardb. Irwin, A. A. General. To Major-General Banks, Commanding United States Forces near Port Hudson: headquarters Port Hudson, La., July 7. General: Having received information from your troops that Vicksburgh has been surrendered, I make this communication to ask you to give me the official assurance whether this is true or not, and if true I ask for a cessation of hositilities General Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces, Port Hudson: General: In reply to your communication dated the seventh instant, by flag of truce received a few moments since, I have the honor to inform you that I received yesterday morning, July seventh, at forty-five minutes past ten o'clock, by the gunboat General Price, an official despatch from Major-General Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. army, whereof the following is a true extract: headquarters Department of the Tennessee, near Vicksburgh, J
y in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissances in force to that effect, on the twenty-seventh May and fourteenth June, General Banks showed great judgment and humanity in not attempting it again until he had fully invested the place by a series of irresistible approaches. His wisdom in this matter is proved not only by the very difficult nature of the ground we found within the fortification — full of deep and impenetrable ravines, where a very small force could oppose a large one--but by the testimony of Gardner himself. It is really pleasurable to look back now and see how mu
July 8th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 40
servant, N. P. Banks, Major-General Commanding. The following were the articles of capitulation proposed between the commissioners on the part of the garrison of Port Hudson, La., and the forces of the United States before said place, July eighth, 1863: article 1. Major-General Frank Gardner surrendered to the United States forces under Major-General Banks, the place of Port Hudson and its dependencies, with its garrison, armament, munitions, public funds, material of war, in the condition as nearly as may be in which they were at the hour of cessation of hostilities, namely, six o'clock A. M., July eighth, 1863. article 2. The surrender stipulated in Article 1 is qualified by no condition, save that the officers and enlisted men composing the garrison shall receive the treatment due to prisoners of war, according to the usages of civilized warfare. article 3. All private property of officers and enlisted men shall be inspected and left to their respective owners.
up his mind to surrender at the expiration of that time, and that any serious demonstration would have brought out a flag at any moment. We learn from this, that the glory of Port Hudson is not to be hidden in the larger but fuller one of Vicksburgh; but must stand upon its own intrinsic individuality; a result of certain irresistible combination, and not the mere sequence of a previous disaster to the rebels. General Gardner also says that the very day our lines closed in on him--May twenty--fourth--brought him, by a courier who came through safely, a positive order from General Johnston to evacuate the post. This shows the wonderful rapidity and dexterity with which General Banks wheeled his army round from Alexandria and Baton Rouge upon the unsuspecting rebel chief, and should never be lost sight of in forming a fair estimate of this very brilliant military movement. Two grand things are taught us by both Vicksburgh and Port Hudson--(so like in their aim, details and resul
e Gulf, before Port Hudson, July 8. To Major-General Frank Gardner, Commanding C. S. Forces, Port Hudson: General: In reply to your communication dated the seventh instant, by flag of truce received a few moments since, I have the honor to inform you that I received yesterday morning, July seventh, at forty-five minutes past tenlate letters I have informed you how, step by step, we were encroaching upon the enemy, until all resistance would be useless. Some — where about midnight of the seventh, a Lieutenant of Holcomb's battery came to the tent of Major-General Augur's Assistant Adjutant-General, and said that the enemy were sounding a bugle, which foree captain, said he did not believe, even then, that Vicksburgh had capitulated. Another amusing instance came to my knowledge. News having reached us on the seventh instant of the fall of Vicksburgh, Colonel Nelson, commanding the colored regiment on our right, received official intelligence of the same from his commander, Genera
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