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J. R. Bartlett (search for this): chapter 2.4
quartermaster, and cut his body almost in two. The first lieutenant, Lowry, coming along at the time, inquired who it was, and understanding the response to be Bartlett, instead of Barney, he passed the word that he had sent down all that was left of poor Bartlett. As he came on deck and was about in all parts of the ship durinBartlett. As he came on deck and was about in all parts of the ship during the fight, he gave the men news of the progress of the fight and of the casualties, and for once I was completely out of existence. The ship was now clear of the hulks and steamed up the river, throwing shells and shrapnel into Fort Jackson as fast as the guns could be loaded and fired. When just abreast of the fort a shot saptain Craven that Lieutenant O'Kane had been wounded. Craven directed him to put me in charge of the First Division, to which Lowry answered: I sent poor Bartlett down below half an hour ago cut in two. Oh, no, you did not, said Craven; he is on deck close to you. Lowry turned and was as much surprised as if he had
Barney Sands (search for this): chapter 2.4
tarted again, and the ship moved on. There were many fire-rafts, and these and the flashing of the guns and bursting shells made.it almost as light as day, but the smoke from the passing fleet was so thick that at times one could see nothing ten feet from the ship. While entangled with the rafts, the Brooklyn was hulled a number of times; one shot from Fort Jackson struck the rail just at the break of the poop and went nearly across, plowing out the deck in its course. Another struck Barney Sands, the signal quartermaster, and cut his body almost in two. The first lieutenant, Lowry, coming along at the time, inquired who it was, and understanding the response to be Bartlett, instead of Barney, he passed the word that he had sent down all that was left of poor Bartlett. As he came on deck and was about in all parts of the ship during the fight, he gave the men news of the progress of the fight and of the casualties, and for once I was completely out of existence. The ship was
D. D. Porter (search for this): chapter 2.4
ly, 1861, I was on board the steam frigate Mississippi when she made a visit to the Southwest Pass, and having been sent to the Powhatan, commanded by Lieutenant D. D. Porter, near by, I walked up and down the quarter-deck with the commanding officer. He was very much exasperated that the department at Washington delayed sending vessels of proper draught to enter the river, and said that if he had half a dozen good vessels he would undertake to run by the forts and capture New Orleans. Admiral Porter has already recounted in this work the prominent part that he took in the opening of the Mississippi, and I therefore omit further reference to it.--J. R. B. The present article is intended merely as a personal narrative of the passage of the forts as seen from the deck of the Brooklyn. This vessel was a flush-deck sloop-of-war, carrying 22 9-inch guns, 1 80-pounder Dahlgren rifle, and 1 30-pounder Parrott rifle. A small poop-deck extended about fifteen feet from the taffrail, and
James O'Kane (search for this): chapter 2.4
d. The barbette guns of the fort not being depressed sufficiently, we received no damage while passing, but we were so close that the pow.--der scorched the faces and clothes of the men. A bullet entered the port of No. 1 gun and struck Lieutenant James O'Kane, who had charge of the first division, in the leg. He fell to the deck, but would not allow himself to be carried below until he had himself fired two of the broadside guns into Fort St. Philip. But the most uncomfortable position on boer leaving Fort St. Philip a shot came in on the starboard quarter and went across the deck, taking off a marine's head and wounding three other men. Lieutenant Lowry came along about this time, and I heard him report to Captain Craven that Lieutenant O'Kane had been wounded. Craven directed him to put me in charge of the First Division, to which Lowry answered: I sent poor Bartlett down below half an hour ago cut in two. Oh, no, you did not, said Craven; he is on deck close to you.
David D. Porter (search for this): chapter 2.4
st, on April 16th, Farragut steamed up with the fleet and anchored just below the point where Porter's mortar Admiral David D. Porter, in command of the mortar-fleet at forts Jackson and St. Philip. From a photograph. vessels, or, as the sailors used to call them, the bummers, had taken their position and had made ready to open fire upon the forts. Admiral Porter has described in this work the part taken by these vessels in the opening of the lower Mississippi. I can vouch for the accuracne by a fall from the mast-head on board the Katahdin.-J. R. B. On the 23d, after five days of continual firing, Commander Porter informed the flag-officer that his men were worn out from want of sleep and rest, and that his ammunition was nearlygate Mississippi when she made a visit to the Southwest Pass, and having been sent to the Powhatan, commanded by Lieutenant D. D. Porter, near by, I walked up and down the quarter-deck with the commanding officer. He was very much exasperated that
J. G. Swift (search for this): chapter 2.4
t was necessary for me to be at my guns, I stood on the port ladder with my head above Rear-Admiral Thomas T. Craven, in command of the Brooklyn at New Orleans. From a photograph. the rail, where I could watch our approach to the forts, and I mounted this ladder several times to see what was going on as we advanced. On the poop were Captain Craven, Midshipman John Anderson, who had volunteered a few days before from the Montgomery, which did not take part in the action, Captain's Clerk J. G. Swift, afterward a graduate of West Point and a lieutenant in the army, and two quartermasters. There was a small piece of ratline stuff carried around the poop, about waist-high. Captain Craven stood at the forward edge of the poop with his hands on this line, and did not move during the whole passage. I had the good fortune during the war to serve with many brave commanders, but I have never met in the service, or out of it, a man of such consummate coolness, such perfect apparent indif
Jacob Parrott (search for this): chapter 2.4
his sudden disappearance, until I asked the quartermaster, who was leadsman in the chains, if he had seen him fall. Why, yes, sir, said he, I saw him fall overboard,--in fact, I helped him; for I hit him alongside of the head with my hand-lead. No guns were fired at the ram from the starboard battery; all the crews a moment before had been at the port guns. As the Manassas drifted by I ran up on the poop, calling the gun's crew with me, to see if I could hit her with the 30-pounder Parrott, but we were unable to depress it sufficiently, at its high elevation, to bring it to bear before she was lost to sight in the smoke. The shot which she had fired came through the chain and planking, above the berth-deck, through a pile of rigging placed against the ship's side, and just entered the sand-bags placed to protect the steam-drum. A few moments after this incident a vessel passed on our starboard side, not ten feet from us, and I could see through the port the men loading a
D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 2.4
h a message from the captain of the Brooklyn, Farragut sent me somewhere to carry an order or to do targets, and getting in provisions and coal. Farragut was about the fleet from early dawn until darammunition and coal. At last, on April 16th, Farragut steamed up with the fleet and anchored just bhey would be sunk by the rams. All this time Farragut maintained that it must and should be done, e was evidently Craven's intention when he saw Farragut's trouble to go to his rescue. As the engineribes this memorable scene: no sooner had Farragut given the order hard-a-port, than the current the port side of the deck, I passed close to Farragut, who, as he looked forward and took in the sider the fire of Fort Jackson until Craven saw Farragut free from the fire-raft, and then she steamed Manassas was seen steaming up the river, and Farragut made signal to the Mississippi to attack her.roborated by Captain Warley of the Manassas. Farragut, in his official report, does not state exact[3 more...]
Thomas T. Craven (search for this): chapter 2.4
arried around the poop, about waist-high. Captain Craven stood at the forward edge of the poop withperfect apparent indifference to danger as Admiral Craven. As I write, I hear the sad news of his dno one knew t he cause of the stoppage; and as Craven called out, Stand by the starboard anchor, and the starboard quarter, and a moment after Captain Craven said, in his deep bass voice, u One bell! id not see the ram Manassas. It was evidently Craven's intention when he saw Farragut's trouble to ly noticed by the newspaper correspondents, as Craven had old-fashioned ideas and would allow no repre cut to burn one second. As she approached, Craven gave the vessel a sheer to starboard, and we bor her smoke-stack is abaft her mainmast! Captain Craven, however, repeated the order, Don't fire! aven that Lieutenant O'Kane had been wounded. Craven directed him to put me in charge of the First ago cut in two. Oh, no, you did not, said Craven; he is on deck close to you. Lowry turned a[9 more...]
Albert Kautz (search for this): chapter 2.4
raft alongside and with flames running up the rigging on the tarred rope to the mast-head. The tug Mosher was near by, but I did not see the ram Manassas. It was evidently Craven's intention when he saw Farragut's trouble to go to his rescue. As the engine stopped, the Brooklyn dropped down, her head swinging to starboard, until she was on a line between Fort Jackson and the Hartford. The Flag-ship Hartford attacked by a fire-raft, pushed by the Confederate tug-boat Mosher. Commander Albert Kautz, who was at this time lieutenant on the Hartford, in a letter to the Editors thus describes this memorable scene: no sooner had Farragut given the order hard-a-port, than the current gave the ship a broad sheer, and her bows went hard up on a mud bank. As the fire-raft came against the port side of the ship, it became enveloped in flames. We were so near to the shore that from the bowsprit we could reach the tops of the bushes, and such a short distance above Fort St. Philip th
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