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Nathan D. Menken (search for this): chapter 6.41
l Banks, on the morning of the 17th, directed a forward movement to force a passage across the river. The river was much swollen by rains, rendering it impossible to ford. There being but one bridge, it became the center of contest, the enemy having failed to destroy it, although he had set fire to it. A splendid dash by a detachment of our cavalry through the bridge drove the enemy away and extinguished the flames. This gallant charge was made by two companies of the 1st Ohio, under Captains Menken and Robinson, and one company of the 1st Michigan, led by a little corporal. Dismounting, they put out the fire, carrying water from the river in their old slouched hats for the purpose. (The name of this dashing corporal was George R. Maxwell, who afterward, by his gallantry and daring achievements, rose to the command of his regiment and brigade under the heroic Sheridan.) The bridge secured, our army moved forward under a heavy fire from the enemy's line and batteries. By 11 A. M.
John R. Kenly (search for this): chapter 6.41
tors. and Fremont beyond the Shenandoah mountains, Jackson, on the 23d, with his army of about 1500, dashed down upon Banks's 9000, mostly stationed in detachments at Strasburg and Front Royal, nearly 20 miles apart, by the route Banks was forced to take. But not until after three days of hard fighting did he force the heroic soldiers of Banks's division from the valley. Jackson made his attack at Front Royal on the 23d, and, after a stubborn resistance, captured the command of Colonel John R. Kenly, composed of the 1st Maryland Cavalry, and a section of Knops's Pennsylvania Battery, acting as guard to Banks's communications. The latter was warned by this dash of Jackson's purposes. He says in his report: The extraordinary force of the enemy could no longer be doubted. It was apparent also that they had a more extended purpose than the capture of the brave little band at Front Royal. This purpose could be nothing less than the defeat of my own command or its possible cap
Turner Ashby (search for this): chapter 6.41
ackson had fled with his army from the valley, leaving only a small force under Ashby for observation, and that he had driven this force beyond the Shenandoah at Mou P. M., March 22d, Jackson announced his appearance in our front by the guns of Ashby's artillery. Ashby, advancing from the direction of Strasburg, forced our outpAshby, advancing from the direction of Strasburg, forced our outposts back upon their reserves, and attacked them with his cavalry. At the sound of the first gun, General Shields hurried to the front with reenforcements, returnede enemy, as the force in my front was nothing more than an observation force of Ashby's cavalry. At daylight, on the 23d, my command was moving; so was the enemy' him to send me reenforcements. I was satisfied that not only was the force of Ashby present, but the entire army of Stonewall Jackson, with that general in command field on account of wounds received in the engagement of the 22d of March with Ashby's cavalry in front of Winchester, now arrived, and in General orders, no. 28, d
Orris S. Ferry (search for this): chapter 6.41
a photograph. already be destroyed. On the 6th, Tyler's brigade of 2000 men and 1 battery followed to support Carroll. Ferry's brigade was at Columbia crossing, 8 miles south, and mine was 6 miles north of Luray. Fremont's and Jackson's guns weepublic with Tyler yet fifteen miles in rear. My brigade, under orders for Stanardsville, passed Luray and encamped with Ferry's, and on the 9th moved forward, leaving Ferry in his position. On the 8th, Fremont brought Jackson to bay, and engager, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was ordered at once to move forward, to be followed by Ferry's, then ten miles in my rear. At 10 o'clock on the morning of the 10th, after a terrible night's march, we reached Conrall's commands; and here I formed a new line, and in position awaited the expected attack from Jackson, and the arrival of Ferry's brigade. Ferry came with our supports, but Jackson, having been severely handled by a small detachment, although he
Samuel S. Carroll (search for this): chapter 6.41
ced until my fire compelled him to halt; then Carroll, Sawyer, and Voris were ordered forward from considerable force in our front. I directed Carroll to move out with his command and attack them,r a sharp conflict the enemy was forced back, Carroll taking several prisoners and one piece (11-poemy having retreated and night having set in, Carroll returned to his position. Our command was d men were well-nigh worn out. On the 5th, Carroll's brigade, now partially supplied, moved withof 2000 men and 1 battery followed to support Carroll. Ferry's brigade was at Columbia crossing, 8failed to bring him to battle. On the 8th, Carroll reached the bridge at Port Republic with Tylerossing for his army at Port Republic, he met Carroll, and, forcing him back, secured the bridge. n old Stonewall Brigade was first repulsed by Carroll's, and Jackson himself was compelled to rallyour worn and defeated comrades of Tyler's and Carroll's commands; and here I formed a new line, and[2 more...]
John H. Patrick (search for this): chapter 6.41
right, leaving only a small force to guard that flank. To meet his masses, now moving to force Tyler back, regiments and batteries were drawn from our left to strengthen our center. The time having come for the decisive movement, my First Brigade, with the supports from the left, and Sullivan's, were made ready. Directing Colonel Sullivan to follow the movements of forces on our right, I ordered the line forward. With a quick move at right-half-wheel, the gallant fellows, under Harrow, Patrick, Foster, Murray, and Voris, with loud cheers, dashed forward through the terrific storm of shot and shell from the enemy's stone-wall and batteries; nor did they halt or falter until the enemy was driven from his protection, and his advancing lines were checked. Our line now had the wall so long held by Jackson. But soon the sturdy foe, reinforced, advanced again to retake the position; they were met by men as gallant and as determined as themselves, and in answer to their wild rebel yell
e 9th, at sundown, Shields, now with me, received by the gallant Myles W. Keogh As captain in the 7th United States Cavalry, Keogh was killed in the massacre, by the Sioux, of Custer's command, June 25th, 1876, on a branch of the Little Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was ordered at once to move forward, to be followed by Ferry's, then ten miles in my rear. At 10 o'clock on the morning of the 10th, after a terrible night's march, we reached Conrad's store, some six miles below the field of action, where I met our worn and defeated comrades of Tyler's and Carroll's commands; and here I formed a new line, and in position awaited the expected attack from Jackson, and the arrival of Ferry's brigade. Ferry came with our supports, but Jackson, having been severely handled by a small detachment, although he had defeated it, was satisfied, now that he was free from Fremont, not to try conclusions with the division, united, that had defeate
1862 the division of the Union army afterward commanded by General James Shields was reorganized by General Frederick W. Lander, under whose lead it had taken part in the hardships of a winter campaign through the mountains and in the valleys of the upper Potomac. On the 1st of March orders were received directing General Lander to move his division from West Virginia into the valley of the Shenandoah, to unite with the divisions under General Banks in the operations already begun against Stonewall Jackson. For an account of Jackson's early operations in the valley, see Vol. I., p. 111. But the brave Lander was not again to lead us. When the order came, it found him overcome by exposures and hardships, and on the 2d of March he died, at the camp of the division, on the Great Cacapon River. The division began the movement under this order on the 5th, and on the 7th, while we were on the way, General Shields arrived from Washington and assumed command. General Banks had already
James B. Ricketts (search for this): chapter 6.41
osition. Our command was aroused from its slumbers early on the morning of the 1st of June by the roar of cannon away to our left toward Strasburg. Fremont had passed over the mountains and attacked Jackson's forces at Fisher's Hill. General Shields, at Front Royal, was informed of the fight going on at Strasburg and came to the front, but declined to send our forces to join in the fight, and directed us to remain in our position to await the arrival of General Irvin McDowell and Ord's (Ricketts's) division. General McDowell arrived on the evening of June 1st. Ord's division relieved ours in front, and Bayard's cavalry was sent to aid Fremont, Our division returned to Front Royal and encamped two miles south on the road to Luray. By the wisdom (?) of Generals McDowell and Shields, our division was sent up the Luray valley, east of the south branch of the Shenandoah and Massanutten mountain, while Jackson's army, pursued by Fremont, was moving up the valley, along the Staunto
Robert H. Milroy (search for this): chapter 6.41
e crossing of the Shenandoah toward Luray. Under cover of these a part of the force under Edward Johnson moved, on the 7th, to prevent the capture of Staunton by Milroy. Meeting General Milroy at McDowell and checking Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides claimed success in the affair at McDowell on General Milroy at McDowell and checking Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides claimed success in the affair at McDowell on the 8th of May [see p. 286]. The operations against Stonewall Jackson were successful, with the valley of Virginia in our possession, and Jackson's army held in cheek beyond the Shenandoah by Banks and Shields. General McDowell, with his army, held Fredericksburg and the line of the Rappahannock, General Fremont moving toward Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides claimed success in the affair at McDowell on the 8th of May [see p. 286]. The operations against Stonewall Jackson were successful, with the valley of Virginia in our possession, and Jackson's army held in cheek beyond the Shenandoah by Banks and Shields. General McDowell, with his army, held Fredericksburg and the line of the Rappahannock, General Fremont moving toward Staunton from the west, and General McClellan, with the Army of the Potomac, was advancing up the peninsula, confronting the Confederate army under Johnston. Thus was Washington protected, and the ruin of the Confederacy imminent, when a blunder in the management of our armies in Virginia was made. The order directing Shields's
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