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C. S. Hamilton (search for this): chapter 6.41
s, northern Virginia. Banks's command was the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and consisted of two divisions, that of Hamilton, afterward Williams's, and Lander's, afterward Shields's. During the Peninsular campaign, Banks was given a separate comd moved forward, and was then advancing near Winchester. Expecting that the enemy would resist his farther advance, General Hamilton requested General Shields to push forward to his support. General Shields, complying, sent forward, on the evening hard march, united, early on the morning of the 12th, with Hamilton's division, and advanced with it, and at 2 P. M. General Hamilton's troops occupied the city and its defenses without serious opposition. Jackson, having abandoned the place, retreas to garrison Martinsburg, while other forces of General Banks's command remained at Harpers Ferry and Charlestown. General Hamilton, commanding the First Division, having received orders assigning him to duty elsewhere, General Banks assigned Gener
Alpheus S. Williams (search for this): chapter 6.41
Ferry and Charlestown. General Hamilton, commanding the First Division, having received orders assigning him to duty elsewhere, General Banks assigned General Alpheus S. Williams to the command of that division. Early on the morning of March 17th, Shields, under orders from General Banks to make a reconnoissance, moved out fronts, and our army remained in camp at Middletown and Cedar Creek that night, while the enemy escaped to Fisher's Hill. Having been reenforeed by the return of Williams's division, the army under General Banks moved forward on the morning of the 25th, and after light skirmishing occupied Strasburg and Fisher's Hill, the enemy coon the enemy, our loss being light. For his success General Banks received that night the thanks of the President. On the 19th and 20th our forces, under General Williams, advanced and occupied Harrisonburg, while Shields's division held the roads to Luray, the crossings of the Shenandoah, and New Market. General Banks, in Gen
, with his army of about 1500, dashed down upon Banks's 9000, mostly stationed in detachments at Strasburg and Front Royal, nearly 20 miles apart, by the route Banks was forced to take. But not until after three days of hard fighting did he force the heroic soldiers of Banks's division from the valley. Jackson made his attack at Front Royal on the 23d, and, after a stubborn resistance, captured the command of Colonel John R. Kenly, composed of the 1st Maryland Cavalry, and a section of Knops's Pennsylvania Battery, acting as guard to Banks's communications. The latter was warned by this dash of Jackson's purposes. He says in his report: The extraordinary force of the enemy could no longer be doubted. It was apparent also that they had a more extended purpose than the capture of the brave little band at Front Royal. This purpose could be nothing less than the defeat of my own command or its possible capture by occupying Winchester, and by this movement intercepting suppli
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 6.41
ss attending me while in command of the division, and grateful to the Government for the recognition of my services. Stonewall Jackson, although out of the valley, was still immediately in our front. He was daily increasing in strength by reenforcements, and was active in demonstrations. On the 1st of May, Jackson's army made movements threatening our right at Harrisonburg, and our left near the crossing of the Shenandoah toward Luray. Under cover of these a part of the force under Edward Johnson moved, on the 7th, to prevent the capture of Staunton by Milroy. Meeting General Milroy at McDowell and checking Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides claimed success in the affair at McDowell on the 8th of May [see p. 286]. The operations against Stonewall Jackson were successful, with the valley of Virginia in our possession, and Jackson's army held in cheek beyond the Shenandoah by Banks and Shields. General McDowell, with his army, held Fredericksbur
Frank C. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 6.41
the part of the enemy. Having informed the commanding general of the result of the morning's work, I awaited further orders, which were soon received through Major Armstrong with directions to move forward at once. Colonel Sullivan, with his brigade, was within supporting distance, and the force in my front, the general thought, was not strong enough to resist me. But the enemy had by this time become active and was forming his lines, his force greatly increased by infantry. Calling Major Armstrong's attention to the movements, strength, and position already presented to view, I requested him to return to the general and request him to send me reenforcemeced the enemy to retreat to his former position. At 10 A. M., while I awaited his further movements, General Shields sent the following: Colonel Kimball: Major Armstrong informs me that the enemy at present occupies a position on an eminence on the right flank, also another on the left flank, leaving the center unsupported, wh
E. H. C. Cavins (search for this): chapter 6.41
e and our fearless little band of cavalry rounding his flank, the enemy was forced back across the field to the woods, where he once more attempted to check our advancing lines. With cheers from right to left, our gallant soldiers pushed forward, and as the sun went down, the stubbornly yielding foe, who had thrice advanced to the attack, gave way, and Jackson's army was badly beaten — his shattered brigades in full retreat from the field over which they had so gallantly fought. Colonel E. H. C. Cavins, of the 14th Indiana, writing under date of July 9th, 1887, says of this charge: The Confederates fell back in great disorder, and we advanced in disorder just as great, over stone-walls and over fences, through blackberry-bushes and under-growth. Over logs, through woods, over hills and fields, the brigades, regiments, and companies advanced, in one promiscuous, mixed, and uncontrollable mass. Officers shouted themselves hoarse in trying to bring order out of confusion, but a
John H. Robinson (search for this): chapter 6.41
still advanced until my fire compelled him to halt; then Carroll, Sawyer, and Voris were ordered forward from my lines, and their well-directed fire, with the storm of grape and canister poured from the well-managed guns of Clark's, Jenks's, and Robinson's batteries, forced the enemy to retreat to his former position. At 10 A. M., while I awaited his further movements, General Shields sent the following: Colonel Kimball: Major Armstrong informs me that the enemy at present occupies a positiroy it, although he had set fire to it. A splendid dash by a detachment of our cavalry through the bridge drove the enemy away and extinguished the flames. This gallant charge was made by two companies of the 1st Ohio, under Captains Menken and Robinson, and one company of the 1st Michigan, led by a little corporal. Dismounting, they put out the fire, carrying water from the river in their old slouched hats for the purpose. (The name of this dashing corporal was George R. Maxwell, who afterwa
Frederick W. Lander (search for this): chapter 6.41
army afterward commanded by General James Shields was reorganized by General Frederick W. Lander, under whose lead it had taken part in the hardships of a winter cams of the upper Potomac. On the 1st of March orders were received directing General Lander to move his division from West Virginia into the valley of the Shenandoah, ac, and consisted of two divisions, that of Hamilton, afterward Williams's, and Lander's, afterward Shields's. During the Peninsular campaign, Banks was given a separe valley, or that his force was too small and he too cautious Brigadier-General Frederick W. Lander. From a photograph. to return to attack, and in compliance wit dinners cooking. King called up his adjutant, Major Barstow, who had been General Lander's adjutant when he commanded us, and ordered him to detail sufficient troopwhole division, exclaiming: Who are these vandals? Why, said Barstow, they are Lander's old troops from Western Virginia; you had better keep your guards here at hea
Alvin C. Voris (search for this): chapter 6.41
y and artillery against Sullivan on the left and my own brigade on the right, he forced my skirmish line to retire until under cover of our main line and batteries, and still advanced until my fire compelled him to halt; then Carroll, Sawyer, and Voris were ordered forward from my lines, and their well-directed fire, with the storm of grape and canister poured from the well-managed guns of Clark's, Jenks's, and Robinson's batteries, forced the enemy to retreat to his former position. At 10 A. left, and Sullivan's, were made ready. Directing Colonel Sullivan to follow the movements of forces on our right, I ordered the line forward. With a quick move at right-half-wheel, the gallant fellows, under Harrow, Patrick, Foster, Murray, and Voris, with loud cheers, dashed forward through the terrific storm of shot and shell from the enemy's stone-wall and batteries; nor did they halt or falter until the enemy was driven from his protection, and his advancing lines were checked. Our line
That portion of our command left in the village had saved the loaded freight trains, but the warehouses and depots were completely destroyed, with most of their contents. General Shields came up at 5 P. M. with the other brigades of the division, and the town and the captures were left to his direction. The captures at Front Royal were: 1 piece of artillery, 3 heavily laden trains with stores, and 8 wagons, with teams, retreating with commissary stores, and 160 prisoners, including Miss Belle Boyd, a famous spy in the service of the Confederates. We also recaptured many comrades of Banks's division, captured during the fight of a few days before.--N. K. With the regiments of my brigade and the 4th, Colonel Carroll's, I returned to the front and encamped in line for the night. On the 31st the enemy appeared in considerable force in our front. I directed Carroll to move out with his command and attack them, which was promptly done, and after a sharp conflict the enemy was forc
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