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David B. Birney (search for this): chapter 3.28
non. I sent the news to every division and said, Be ready. Devens states in his official report that at intervals between 11 A. M. and 6:30 P. M. he reported to corps headquarters that the enemy in force was threatening his front and his right flank.--editors. Slocum went forward to the aid of Sickles, and Hancock was behind him with support. Next, the enemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore, of his staff, who had gone out with Birney to see the attack upon Jackson, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Howard rode rapidly to Sickles, that he might point out exactly where to locate the brigade. The major was also to ascertain the nearest route, so as to save time and not weary the men by a circuitous march. It was already past 4. There was much excitement among the groups of officers at the different points of observation. We who were at Dowdall's had been wat
Leopold Gilsa (search for this): chapter 3.28
nce he established his division,--the Second Brigade, under McLean, next to Schurz's first, and then pushing out on the pike for half a mile he deployed the other, Gilsa's, at right angles facing west, connecting his two parts by a thin skirmish-line. Colonel Gilsa's brigade was afterward drawn back, still facing west at right angColonel Gilsa's brigade was afterward drawn back, still facing west at right angles to the line, so as to make a more solid connection, and so that, constituting, as it did, the main right flank, the reserves of the corps could be brought more promptly to its support, by extending its right to the north, should an enemy by any possible contingency get so far around. A section of Dieckmann's battery which looke batteries, twelve guns, were put upon a ridge abreast of the little church and pointed toward the north-west, with a view to sweep all approaches to the north of Gilsa, firing up a gradually ascending slope. This ridge, where I stood during the battle, was central, and, besides, enabled the artillerymen to enfilade either roadwa
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 3.28
l Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a comparatively short front between the Rappahannock and the Catherine Furnace, not exceeding two miles and a half in extent. His righe was found and crossed. The Catherine Furnace, nearly opposite Sickles's right and two and a half miles distant, gave an open reach and fully exposed the moving column to view. Except at that point the Confederates were covered by woods and by Stuart's busy and noisy cavalry. The Wilderness Church. From a War-time photograph. See previous page. The Confederates carrying Howard's breastworks. About sunrise at Dowdall's I heard cheering. It was a hearty sound, with too much bass
Nathaniel C. McLean (search for this): chapter 3.28
range Plank road and the old turnpike for at least three miles toward the west. After this reconnoissance he established his division,--the Second Brigade, under McLean, next to Schurz's first, and then pushing out on the pike for half a mile he deployed the other, Gilsa's, at right angles facing west, connecting his two parts byttered, rolled and tumbled like runaway wagons and carts in a thronged city. The guns and the masses of the right brigade struck the second line of Devens before McLean's front had given way; and, more quickly than it could be told, with all the fury of the wildest hailstorm, everything, every sort of organization that lay in thethe screeching shells and all the hot excitement of battle, says again: He (meaning our forces from Schimmelfennig's and Buschbeck's brigades, and perhaps part of McLean's, who had faced about and had not yet given way) made a stubborn resistance from behind a wattling fence on a hill covered thickly with pines. Among the stubb
Isaac R. Trimble (search for this): chapter 3.28
was no real battle there, so we returned rapidly to our post at the tavern and dismounted. Meanwhile the Confederate General Rodes had been reaching his place in the Wilderness. At 4 P. M. his men were in position; the line of battle of his own brigade touched the pike west of us with its right and stretched away to the north; beyond his brigade came Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimble's division (Colston Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), with Ramseur on the right following Colquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P. Hill. The advance Confederate division had more men in it than there were in the Eleventh Corps, now in position. Counting the ranks of this formidable column, beginning with the enveloping skirmish line, we find 7, besides the 3 ranks of file-closers. Many of them were brought into a solid mass by the enta
Henry W. Slocum (search for this): chapter 3.28
l day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry aleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six milesnstituted the right wing of the army, Meade's, Slocum's, and mine, had crossed from the north to theeached the vicinity of Chancellorsville, where Slocum, who was the senior commander present, establie Chancellorsville House. There I reported to Slocum. He said that the orders were for me to cover3], and said, Establish your right there. General Slocum promised, with the Twelfth Corps, to occupening his front and his right flank.--editors. Slocum went forward to the aid of Sickles, and Hancocmy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowrs. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was no longer within ts after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally supposing that I had a copy, would [2 more...]
Hiram G. Berry (search for this): chapter 3.28
and roads with triumphant shouts and redoubled firing, and so secured much plunder and many prisoners. It was after sundown and growing dark when I met General Hiram G. Berry, commanding a division of the Third Corps, as I was ascending the high ground above named. Well, General, where now? he asked. You take the right of thace of the fire was effectually barred by the artillery and supporting troops. Stonewall Jackson fell that evening from bullet-wounds, in the forest in front of Berry's position. And here, on the forenoon of the next day, May 3d, the gallant General Berry met his death. It was here, too, that officers of the Eleventh Corps, thGeneral Berry met his death. It was here, too, that officers of the Eleventh Corps, though mortified by defeat, successfully rallied the scattered brigades and divisions, and, after shielding the batteries, went during the night to replace the men of the Fifth Corps and thereafter defend the left of the general line. Twenty-three years ago, in my report to General Hooker, I wrote the following: Now, as to t
Cyrus B. Comstock (search for this): chapter 3.28
previous page. The Confederates carrying Howard's breastworks. About sunrise at Dowdall's I heard cheering. It was a hearty sound, with too much bass in it for that of the enemy's charge. It was occasioned by General Hooker, with Colonel Comstock and a few staff-officers, riding along slowly and inspecting the lines. General Sickles says of this: It is impossible to pass over without mention the irrepressible enthusiasm of the troops for Major-General Hooker, which was evinced in he by the shortest route. As he looked over the barricades, while receiving the salutes and cheers of the men, he said to me, How strong! How strong! I still had much extension, so that there were gaps along Schurz's and Devens's fronts. Colonel Comstock spoke to me in his quiet way: General, do close in those spaces! I said, The woods are thick and entangled; will anybody come through there Oh, they may! His suggestion was heeded. During the forenoon General Sickles discovered J
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 3.28
um. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a comparatively short front between the Rappahannock and the Catherine Furnace, not exceeding two miles and a half in extent. His right wing, not far from the river, was behind Mott's Run, which flows due east, and his left was deployed along the Catherine Furnace road. Could Hooker, on the first day of
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 3.28
ns, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a he enemy in force was threatening his front and his right flank.--editors. Slocum went forward to the aid of Sickles, and Hancock was behind him with support. Next, the enemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore, of his staff, who had gone out with Birney to see the attack upon Jackson, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Howard rode rapidly to Sickles, that he might point out exa
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