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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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April 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 12.90
partly to influence public opinion in favor of the Confederacy, and also with a general authority to fit out ships of war. In March, 1863, he purchased on the Clyde the Japan, a new iron screw steamer. She was an excellent vessel, although built for the merchant service, but she was seriously defective as a commerce-destroyer, from the lack of auxiliary sail-power, a defect which Bulloch, in his contracts and purchases, had uniformly avoided. The Japan cleared from Greenock on the 1st of April, 1863, in ballast, as a merchant vessel, bound for the East Indies. A shipping firm of Liverpool was employed as the intermediary to cover all the transactions. One member of the firm was the ostensible owner, and the Japan was registered in his name as a British vessel, and remained so for three months, though engaged during this time in active hostilities against the United States. Another member of the firm shipped the crew, and took charge of a small steamer which cleared about the sa
November, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 12.90
h jurisdiction. The jury, in consequence, brought in a verdict of not guilty. Appeals and for a new trial followed, but were defeated upon various technical grounds, and the vessel was eventually released. The protracted series of trials, however, kept the vessel in custody until it was too late to make use of her as a cruiser, and she became a blockade-runner. Another vessel, the Pampero, built by Lieutenant George T. Sinclair, on the Clyde, was seized by the Scottish officials in November, 1863. To avoid the litigation and delay which had attended the Alexandra case a compromise was arranged between the owners — that is, the builders — and the Government, by which a verdict was entered for the Crown, and the owners were allowed to retain the vessel, provided they should not sell her for two years without the consent of the Crown. This simple arrangement, if it had been adopted in the case of the other cruisers, would have obviated the whole controversy over the so-called Alab
our weeks, to put her machinery in thorough order at her leisure, and to take on board 300 tons of coal. Her crew, which had now been reduced by desertions to thirty men, was reinforced with an addition of forty-two new recruits, the authorities showing extreme slackness in preventing the enlistments, notwithstanding the urgent representations of the United States Consul. Leaving Melbourne on February 18th, the Shenandoah pursued her course to the northward. Three vessels were captured in April and one in May. In the latter part of June, approaching Behring Strait, she fell in with the New Bedford whaling fleet. In the course of one week, from the 21st to the 28th, twenty-five whalers were captured, of which four were ransomed, and the remaining twenty-one were burnt. The loss on these twenty-one whalers was estimated at upwards of $3,000,000, and considering that it occurred in June, 1865, two months after the Confederacy had virtually passed out of existence, it may be cha
river. Her cruise lasted six months, during which she made fifteen prizes. Of these seven were destroyed, one was ransomed, one recaptured, and the remaining six were sent into Cienfuegos, where they were released by the Cuban authorities. In January the Sumter arrived at Gibraltar, where she was laid up and finally sold. The Confederate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For this She sailed with a cargo of cotton on December 24th, while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of the navy commanded her, and his object was to obtain supplies at Bermuda for Lee's army. She returned late in January, but was unable to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, and after landing her stores at Nassau she proceeded to Liverpool. Here she was seized by the authorities, and ultimately she was delivered to the United States. The last of the Confe
sell her for two years without the consent of the Crown. This simple arrangement, if it had been adopted in the case of the other cruisers, would have obviated the whole controversy over the so-called Alabama claims. Secretary Mallory attached a high importance to the construction of iron-clads, and already, in June, 1862, he had directed Bulloch to procure them. The latter immediately made a contract with the Lairds, the builders of the Alabama, to build two double-turret iron-clads, of 1800 tons each, fitted with rams and with powerful engines, and carrying 5 1/2 inches of armor and a battery of four 9-inch rifles. They were probably superior to any vessels at that time in the possession of the United States. The main object for which they were intended was the recovery of the Mississippi. In the spring of 1863 Bulloch began to feel apprehensive that measures might be taken to stop the building of the rams. He accordingly arranged with a mercantile firm in Paris, Messrs. Bra
October 29th (search for this): chapter 12.90
ng the United States coast and so on to Halifax. The small coasters and fishing vessels were totally unprepared for an enemy, and over thirty of them were captured, nearly all being destroyed. At one time the Tallahassee was not far from New York, and several cruisers were sent out in pursuit of her, but without success. At Halifax the authorities were not inclined to permit repairs or supplies of coal. Wood put to sea again, and on the 26th ran the blockade into Wilmington. On the 29th of October the Tallahassee, now called the Olustee, made another short cruise along the coast as far as Sandy Hook, under Lieutenant Ward, making seven prizes, and returning again to Wilmington after a slight brush with the blockading vessels. Her battery was now removed, and, after a fictitious sale to the navy agent at Wilmington, she was renamed the Chameleon. She sailed with a cargo of cotton on December 24th, while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of t
he 28th, twenty-five whalers were captured, of which four were ransomed, and the remaining twenty-one were burnt. The loss on these twenty-one whalers was estimated at upwards of $3,000,000, and considering that it occurred in June, 1865, two months after the Confederacy had virtually passed out of existence, it may be characterized as the most useless act of hostility that occurred during the whole war. The first intimation received by Waddell of the progress of events at home was on June 22d, when the captain of one of the whalers told him that he believed the war was over; the statement was, however, unsupported by other evidence, and Waddell declined to believe it. On the 23d he received from one of his prizes San Francisco newspapers of a sufficiently late date to contain news of the fall of Richmond. The war was not yet ended, however, and subsequently to the receipt of these newspapers fifteen whalers were destroyed. On the 28th, the work of destroying the fleet having b
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