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Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (search for this): chapter 12.90
ore obliged to start with only 23 seamen instead of 120, which was her complement. The Shenandoah proceeded first to Melbourne. On her way she met nine American vessels, seven of which were destroyed and the others ransomed. From the crews of tamen who consented to enlist on board the Shenandoah, making her total number forty-seven. The Shenandoah arrived at Melbourne on the 25th of January, 1865. Here she was admitted to a building slip on the ground that she needed repairs. She was also allowed to remain at Melbourne nearly four weeks, to put her machinery in thorough order at her leisure, and to take on board 300 tons of coal. Her crew, which had now been reduced by desertions to thirty men, was reinforced with an addition ackness in preventing the enlistments, notwithstanding the urgent representations of the United States Consul. Leaving Melbourne on February 18th, the Shenandoah pursued her course to the northward. Three vessels were captured in April and one in
nt was forced to interpose; and although during the next six months the work of construction was permitted to go on, at the end of that time the ships were ordered to be sold under penalty of seizure. Of the four corvettes, two were bought by Prussia and two by Peru. One of the rams was sold to Prussia and the other, known as the Sphinx, to Denmark. Before her arrival in Copenhagen the Schleswig-Holstein war was over, and the Danes, having no use for her, were well satisfied to have her taPrussia and the other, known as the Sphinx, to Denmark. Before her arrival in Copenhagen the Schleswig-Holstein war was over, and the Danes, having no use for her, were well satisfied to have her taken off their hands without inquiring too closely into the character of the purchaser. In this way Bulloch got possession of her, and on the 30th of January, 1865, she was commissioned in the English Channel as the Stonewall, and started on a cruise under Captain T. J. Page. The Stonewall had not gone far before she sprang a leak and put into Ferrol for repairs. Here she was found by the Niagara and Sacramento, under Commodore T. T. Craven, who took up a position in the adjoining port of C
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of the navy commanded her, and his object was to obtain supplies at Bermuda for Lee's army. She returned late in January, but was unable to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, and after landing her stores at Nassau she proceeded to Liverpool. Here she was seized by the authorities, and ultimately she was delivered to the United States. The last of the Confederate commerce-destroyers was the Sea King, or Shenandoah. Commander John M. Brooke, the Confederate ordnance officer at Richmond, devised the plan which was afterward adopted on her cruise. Brooke's service in the North Pacific Exploring Expedition of 1855 had familiarized him with the movements of the New Bedford whaling fleet, and it was against this fleet that the proposed cruise was to be made. The whalers generally cruised in the South Pacific in winter, going in the spring to Behring Strait, where they remained during the summer season,
and also with a general authority to fit out ships of war. In March, 1863, he purchased on the Clyde the Japan, a new iron screw steamer. She was an excellent vessel, although built for the merchant service, but she was seriously defective as a commerce-destroyer, from the lack of auxiliary sail-power, a defect which Bulloch, in his contracts and purchases, had uniformly avoided. The Japan cleared from Greenock on the 1st of April, 1863, in ballast, as a merchant vessel, bound for the East Indies. A shipping firm of Liverpool was employed as the intermediary to cover all the transactions. One member of the firm was the ostensible owner, and the Japan was registered in his name as a British vessel, and remained so for three months, though engaged during this time in active hostilities against the United States. Another member of the firm shipped the crew, and took charge of a small steamer which cleared about the same time from Newhaven, with a cargo of guns and ammunition. The
Sheerness (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.90
The Confederate operations in England did not suffer motions so much from the penalty inflicted upon the guilty parties as from the scandal and notoriety caused by the prosecution and the light which it threw upon the methods of the purchasing agents. Notwithstanding all this, Commander Maury was not deterred from making a second attempt, which was even less profitable. During the latter part of 1863, several condemned dispatch boats belonging to the royal navy were offered for sale at Sheerness; one of these, the Victor, was bought by an agent of Maury's. In such cases it was usual to allow the purchaser to put in the equipment of the vessel and overhaul her machinery at the dock-yard; but, whatever the practice may be, it is of course necessary that a neutral government should take care that it is not thereby instrumental in turning over a ship-of-war to a belligerent. The real ownership of the Victor was carefully concealed, and, wittingly or unwittingly, the dock-yard officia
Halifax, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.90
hen fitted out and armed as a cruiser, and on the 6th of August sailed from Wilmington under Commander John T. Wood. Her cruise lasted less than three weeks, but was remarkably successful. It extended along the United States coast and so on to Halifax. The small coasters and fishing vessels were totally unprepared for an enemy, and over thirty of them were captured, nearly all being destroyed. At one time the Tallahassee was not far from New York, and several cruisers were sent out in pursuit of her, but without success. At Halifax the authorities were not inclined to permit repairs or supplies of coal. Wood put to sea again, and on the 26th ran the blockade into Wilmington. On the 29th of October the Tallahassee, now called the Olustee, made another short cruise along the coast as far as Sandy Hook, under Lieutenant Ward, making seven prizes, and returning again to Wilmington after a slight brush with the blockading vessels. Her battery was now removed, and, after a fictitio
Bordeaux (France) (search for this): chapter 12.90
ting several months, the vessels were finally purchased by the Admiralty for the royal navy, on whose list they appeared as the Scorpion and the Wivern. Only one attempt was made to procure ships of war for the Confederates in France. From intimations received by Mr. Slidell, the commissioner at Paris, it was believed that the French emperor would place no obstacle in the way of Confederate operations in France. A contract was therefore made with Arman, an influential ship-builder, of Bordeaux, early in 1863, for four corvettes, and in the following July for two powerful iron-clad rams, each carrying a 300-pounder Armstrong rifle in a casemate and two 70-pounders in a turret. Before the work was far advanced, however,--that is, in September, 1863,--the United States Minister, Mr. Dayton, was informed of the whole transaction, the through certain letters which came into the possession of John Bigelow, Consul-General at Paris. The letters formed a complete exposure of the busines
Newhaven (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.90
last, as a merchant vessel, bound for the East Indies. A shipping firm of Liverpool was employed as the intermediary to cover all the transactions. One member of the firm was the ostensible owner, and the Japan was registered in his name as a British vessel, and remained so for three months, though engaged during this time in active hostilities against the United States. Another member of the firm shipped the crew, and took charge of a small steamer which cleared about the same time from Newhaven, with a cargo of guns and ammunition. The two vessels met off the coast of France, the cargo was transferred, the officers proceeded on board, and the Confederate cruiser Georgia, though still registered as the British steamer Japan, started on her cruise. Her career extended over a year, during which she cruised in the Atlantic under Lieutenant William L. Maury. During her cruise she captured only eight vessels, her movements being restricted by her want of sail-power and her limited co
Ferrol (Spain) (search for this): chapter 12.90
lloch got possession of her, and on the 30th of January, 1865, she was commissioned in the English Channel as the Stonewall, and started on a cruise under Captain T. J. Page. The Stonewall had not gone far before she sprang a leak and put into Ferrol for repairs. Here she was found by the Niagara and Sacramento, under Commodore T. T. Craven, who took up a position in the adjoining port of Coruña. On the 24th of March the Stonewall steamed out of Ferrol and lay for several hours off the entraFerrol and lay for several hours off the entrance of Corufia; Craven, however, declined to join battle, under the belief that the odds against him were too great, although the Niagara carried ten heavy rifles, and the Sacramento two 11-inch guns. The Stonewall steamed that night to Lisbon, thence to Teneriffe and Nassau, and finally to Havana. It was now the middle of May, and the Confederacy was breaking up; Captain Page therefore made an agreement with the Captain-General of Cuba, by which the latter advanced $16,000 to pay off his offi
Cardenas (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 12.90
affitt, of the Confederate navy. Her course was first shaped for Cuba. Here Maffitt hoped to obtain certain essential parts of his ordnance which had not been supplied at Nassau, and also to ship a crew. The authorities in Cuba, however, prohibited any shipment of men or supply of equipments, and presently the crew, which numbered only twenty-two, was attacked by yellow fever, until nearly every one on board, including the captain, was prostrated by the disease. After delaying a week at Cardenas and Havana, Maffitt determined to attempt to run the blockade at Mobile. The squadron, at this time off Mobile, was composed of the sloop-of-war Oneida and the gun-boat Winona, under Commander George H. Preble. The Oneida was just completing repairs to her boilers, and was working at a reduced speed. At 5 o'clock on the afternoon of the 4th of September the Florida was sighted in the distance. At this moment the Winona was just returning from a chase in company with the schooner Rache
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