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William Smith (search for this): chapter 12.92
ower of shot and shell, and headed for the French waters; but to no purpose. In winding, the Alabama presented the port battery, with only. two guns bearing, and showed gaping sides, through which the water washed. The Kearsarge pursued, William Smith, quartermaster of the Kearsarge Ani Captain of the after pivot-gun, which it was said inflicted the most damage on the Alabama, from a photograph taken in 1864. keeping on a line nearer the shore, and with a few well-directed shots hastened he could no longer fight or float. The contest was decided by the superiority of the 11-inch Dahlgrens, especially the after-pivot, together with the coolness and accuracy of aim of the gunners of the Kearsarge, and notably by the skill of William Smith, the captain of the after-pivot, who in style and behavior was like Long Tom Coffin in Cooper's Pilot. To the disparagement of Captain Winslow it has been said that Lieutenant-Commander Thornton commanded the ship during the action. This
Frederick Sclopis (search for this): chapter 12.92
to March 15th, 1872) were only about $400,000 greater than those inflicted by the Shenandoah. The sum total of the claims filed against the twelve cruisers for ships and cargoes, up to March 15th, 1872, was $19,782,917.60, all but about six millions of it being charged to the account of the Alabama and Shenandoah. On May 8th, 1871, the Treaty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by t
Directly after the enemy's wounded were brought on board he desired the surgeon to give him no further attention, for he was doing well, requesting that all aid be given to the poor fellows of the Alabama. In the hospital he was patient and resigned, and happy in speaking of the victory. This man, so very interesting by his courage and resignation, wrote the French surgeon-in-chief, received general sympathy; all desired. his recovery and lamented his death. At a dinner given by loyal Americans in Paris to Captain Winslow and two of his officers, a telegram was received announcing the death of Gouin. His name was honorably mentioned, his behavior eulogized, and his memory drunk in silence. The boat from the Alabama announcing the surrender and asking for assistance. The picture shows shot-marks in the thin deal covering of the chain armor amidships. At 3:10 P. M. the Kearsarge anchored in Cherbourg harbor close by the ship-of-war Napoleon, and was soon surrounded by b
Caleb Cushing (search for this): chapter 12.92
ich assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tribunal decided that England was in no way responsible for the $1,781,915.43 of losses inflicted by the Tallahassee, Georgia, Chickamauga, Nashville, Retribution, Jeff. Davis, Sallie, Boston, and Sumter; and on September 14th, 1872, it awarded $15,500,000 damages for actual losses of s
L. M. Dayton (search for this): chapter 12.92
nd all hands called, Captain Winslow gave the welcome news of a telegram from Mr. Dayton, our minister to France, announcing that the Alabama had arrived the day prevsarge was cruising to and fro off the breakwater. A message was brought from Mr. Dayton, our minister to Paris, by his son, who with difficulty had obtained permissi either ship was prohibited, but the permission was given upon the promise of Mr. Dayton to return on shore directly after the delivery of the message. Mr. Dayton exMr. Dayton expressed the opinion that Captain Semmes would not fight, though acknowledging the prevalence of a contrary belief in Cherbourg. He was told that, in the event of batge at quarters. From a photograph. of the French admiral the latter advised Mr. Dayton to remain over night, and mentioned the fixed purpose of Captain Semmes to fiintelligence that there could be no further communication with the Kearsarge. Mr. Dayton passed a part of Saturday night trying to procure a boat to send off the acqu
Roundell Palmer (search for this): chapter 12.92
ty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tribunal decided that England was in no way responsible for the $1,781,915.43 of losses inflicted by the Tallahassee, Georgia, Chickamauga, Nashville, Retribution, Jeff. Davis, Sallie, Bo
as apparent that Captain Semmes intended to fight at long range. The Kearsarge advanced with increased speed, receiving a second and part of a third broadside, with similar effect. Captain Winslow wished to get at short range, as the guns were loaded with five-second shell. Arrived within nine hundred yards, the Kearsarge, fearing a fourth broadside, and Rear-Admiral John A. Winslow, Captain of the Kearsarge. from a photograph taken soon after the fight, in possession of Paymaster-General J. A. Smith, U. S. N. apprehensive of a raking, sheered and broke her silence with the starboard battery. Each ship was now pressed under a full head of steam, the position being broadside, both employing the starboard guns. Captain Winslow, fearful that the enemy would make for the shore, determined with a port helm to run under the Alabama's stern for raking, but was prevented by her sheering and keeping her broadside to the Kearsarge, which forced the fighting on a circular track, ea
James McCloskey (search for this): chapter 12.92
that this statement leaves untouched the question of the right of a prisoner to escape after surrender and before delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, and grog with them. The cond
D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 12.92
chain armor the result would have been nearly the same, notwithstanding the common opinion at the time that the Kearsarge was an iron-clad contending with a wooden ship. The chains were fastened to the ship's sides more than a year previous to the fight, while at the Azores. It was the suggestion of the executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander James S. Thornton, to hang the sheet-chain (or spare anchor-cable) over the sides, so as to protect. the midship section, he having served with Admiral Farragut in passing the forts to reach New Orleans, and having observed its benefit on that occasion. The work was done in three days, at a cost for mateerial not exceeding seventy-five dollars. In our visit to European ports, the use of sheet-chains for protective purposes had attracted notice and caused comment. It is strange that Captain Semmes did not know of the chain armor; supposed spies had been on board and had been shown through the ship, as there was no attempt at concealment; the s
John A. Winslow (search for this): chapter 12.92
moment of the engagement. On Wednesday Captain Winslow paid an official visit to the French admibama! The drum beat to general quarters; Captain Winslow put aside the prayer-book, seized the tru fearing a fourth broadside, and Rear-Admiral John A. Winslow, Captain of the Kearsarge. from a de, both employing the starboard guns. Captain Winslow, fearful that the enemy would make for thfire upon the Kearsarge. [See page 610.] Captain Winslow, amazed at this extraordinary conduct of her ensign was half-masted, union down.. Captain Winslow for the second time gave orders to cease ne he would come on board and surrender. Captain Winslow granted the request. With less generositated the usages of war in surrendering to Captain Winslow through the agency of one of his officersnner given by loyal Americans in Paris to Captain Winslow and two of his officers, a telegram was roper's Pilot. To the disparagement of Captain Winslow it has been said that Lieutenant-Commande[19 more...]
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