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Miles J. Freeman (search for this): chapter 12.92
ead of remaining four hundred yards off. It will be noticed that this statement leaves untouched the question of the right of a prisoner to escape after surrender and before delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners,
Morrison B. Waite (search for this): chapter 12.92
va. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederation; Viscount d'itajuba, named by the Emperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tribunal decided that England was in no way responsible for the $1,781,915.43 of losses inflicted by the Tallahassee, Georgia, Chickamauga, Nashville, Retribution, Jeff. Davis, Sallie, Boston, and Sumter; and on September 14th, 1872, it awarded $15,500,000 damages for actual losses of ships and cargoes and
John McIntosh Kell (search for this): chapter 12.92
mile away. There was a current setting to westward three knots an hour. The action was now fairly begun. The Alabama changed from solid shot to shell. Commander Kell [see p. 608] says the Alabama began with shell.--editors. A shot from an early broadside of the Kearsarge carried away the Captain James S. Thornton, execu resting-place there was no cheer; all was silent. The yacht lowered her two boats, rescued Captain Semmes (wounded in the hand by broken iron rigging), First Lieutenant Kell, twelve officers, and twenty-six men, leaving the rest of the survivors to the two boats of the Kearsarge. Apparently aware that the forty persons he had n the United States Navy; nearly all the crew were English, Irish, and Welsh, a few of whom were said to belong to the Royal naval Reserve. Captain Semmes said, Mr. Kell, my first lieutenant, deserves great credit for the fine condition in which the ship went into action with regard to her battery, magazine, and shell-rooms ; and
James Russell Soley (search for this): chapter 12.92
ped; the victory seemed already lessened. It was held by the Navy Department that Captain Semmes violated the usages of war in surrendering to Captain Winslow through the agency of one of his officers and then effecting an escape during the execution of the commission; that he was a prisoner of the United States Government from the moment he sent the officer to make the surrender. The controversy in reference to the Deerhound is summarized thus in a letter to the editors from Professor James Russell Soley, U. S. N.: A neutral ship, in general, could have no right to take part in hostilities even to the extent of rescuing the drowning sailors of a belligerent, their situation being a: part an(d a consequence of the battle. In the case of the Deerhound, however, the interference was directly authorized by Captain Winslow's request, addressed to Mr. Lancaster, and, therefore, the latter committed no breach of neutrality in taking the prisoners on board. Once on board the Englis
llenge about which so much has been said. Captain Semmes informed Captain Winslow through Mr. Bonfi The commander of the frigate had informed Captain Semmes that his ship would escort him to the limi over or fell short. It was apparent that Captain Semmes intended to fight at long range. The Ketive of dismay, destruction, and death. Captain Semmes in his official report says: The firing noer a duration of one hour and two minutes. Captain Semmes, in his report, says: Although we were nows, the waist-boats having been destroyed. Captain Semmes dropped his sword into the sea and jumped The yacht lowered her two boats, rescued Captain Semmes (wounded in the hand by broken iron riggin. It was held by the Navy Department that Captain Semmes violated the usages of war in surrenderingce and caused comment. It is strange that Captain Semmes did not know of the chain armor; supposed aid to belong to the Royal naval Reserve. Captain Semmes said, Mr. Kell, my first lieutenant, deser[11 more...]
James S. Thornton (search for this): chapter 12.92
ays the Alabama began with shell.--editors. A shot from an early broadside of the Kearsarge carried away the Captain James S. Thornton, executive officer of the Kearsarge. from a photograph taken in 1864. spanker-gaff of the enemy, and caused h than a year previous to the fight, while at the Azores. It was the suggestion of the executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander James S. Thornton, to hang the sheet-chain (or spare anchor-cable) over the sides, so as to protect. the midship section, was like Long Tom Coffin in Cooper's Pilot. To the disparagement of Captain Winslow it has been said that Lieutenant-Commander Thornton commanded the ship during the action. This is not true. Captain Winslow, standing on the horse-block abreas with a fortitude and coolness which cannot be too highly praised, but I feel it due to my executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander Thornton, who superintended the working of the battery, to particularly mention him for an example of coolness and enc
off. It will be noticed that this statement leaves untouched the question of the right of a prisoner to escape after surrender and before delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, an
stance. The picture shows shot-marks in the thin deal covering of the chain armor amidships. At 3:10 P. M. the Kearsarge anchored in Cherbourg harbor close by the ship-of-war Napoleon, and was soon surrounded by boats of every description filled with excited and inquisitive people. Ambulances, by order of the French admiral, were sent to the landing to receive the wounded, and thence they were taken to the Hopital de la Marine, where arrangements had been made for their reception. Dr. Gait and all the prisoners except four officers were paroled and sent on shore before sunset. Secretary Welles soon after expressed his disapprobation of this action. An incident that occasioned gratification was the coincidence of the lowering of the enemy's colors by an early shot from the Kearsarge, already mentioned, and the unfolding of the victorious flag by a shot from the Alabama. The Kearsarge's colors were stopped at the mizzen, that they might be displayed if the ensign were carr
June 14th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 12.92
manding the maritime district, and to the United States commercial agent, bringing on his return the unanticipated news that Captain Semmes had declared his intention to fight. At first the assertion was barely credited, the policy of the Alabama being regarded as opposed to a conflict, and to escape rather than to be exposed to injury, perhaps destruction; but the doubters were half convinced when the so-called challenge was known to read as follows: C. S. S. Alabama, Cherbourg, June 14th, 1864. To A. Bonfils, Esq., Cherbourg. Sir: I hear that you were informed by the U. S. Consul that the Kearsarge was to come to this port solely for the prisoners landed by me, and that she was to depart in twenty-four hours. I desire you to say to the U. S. Consul that my intention is to fight the Kearsarge as soon as I can make the necessary arrangements. I hope these will not detain me more than until to-morrow evening, or after the morrow morning at furthest. I beg she will not depa
et sympathizing friends, the coming battle being the chief topic of conversation. Confident of victory, they proclaimed the intent to sink the Federal or gain a corsair. They rose with promises to meet the following night to repeat the festivity as victors, were escorted to the boat, and departed with cheers and best wishes for a successful return. This incident, and others pertaining to the Alabama, were told the writer by the officers who were taken prisoners.--J. M. B. Sunday, the 19th, came; a fine day, atmosphere somewhat hazy, little sea, light westerly wind. At 10 o'clock the Kearsarge was near the buoy marking the line of shoals to the eastward of Cherbourg, at a distance of about three miles from the entrance. The decks had been holystoned, the bright work cleaned, the guns polished, and the crew were dressed in Sunday suits. They were inspected at quarters and dismissed to attend divine service. Seemingly no one thought of the enemy; so long awaited and not appea
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