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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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The first battle of the Confederate ram Albemarle. by her Builder, Gilbert Elliott. In the spring of 1864 it was decided at Confederate headquarters that an attempt should be made to recapture Plymouth. For an account of the capture of New Berne and Plymouth, North Carolina, by the Union forces, see Vol. I., pp. 647-659. The Confederates made three attempts to recapture New Berne. On March 14th, 1863, General D. H. Hill sent General J. J. Pettigrew with infantry and seventeen guns to attack Fort Anderson, an earthwork on the Neuse opposite the town, and garrisoned by 300 men of the 92d New York. After a bombardment of several hours Pettigrew withdrew and Hill abandoned the project. During the action the gun-boats Hetzel and Hunchback opened upon the Confederate batteries, drove the enemy from the field, and covered the landing of the 85th New York, in aid of the garrison. On January 30th, 1864, an expedition, under General George E. Pickett, set out from Kinston, North C
April 18th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 13.93
paration was made to storm the forts and breastworks as soon as. the Albemarle could clear the river front of the Federal war vessels protecting the place with their guns. Building the Albemarle at Edwards's Ferry. On the morning of April 18th, 1864, the Albemarle left the town of Hamilton and proceeded down the river toward Plymouth, going stern foremost, with chains dragging from the bow, the rapidity of the current making it impracticable to steer with her head down-stream. She came and wounded on the field, in their most heroic charge upon the breastworks protecting the eastern front of the town. General Wessells, commanding the Federal forces, made a gallant resistance, and surrendered only when further effort would have been worse than useless. During the attack the Albemarle held the river front, and all day long poured shot and shell into the resisting forts with her two guns. Commander C. W. Flusser, U. S. N. The sinking of the Southfield (April 18, 1864).
March 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 13.93
The first battle of the Confederate ram Albemarle. by her Builder, Gilbert Elliott. In the spring of 1864 it was decided at Confederate headquarters that an attempt should be made to recapture Plymouth. For an account of the capture of New Berne and Plymouth, North Carolina, by the Union forces, see Vol. I., pp. 647-659. The Confederates made three attempts to recapture New Berne. On March 14th, 1863, General D. H. Hill sent General J. J. Pettigrew with infantry and seventeen guns to attack Fort Anderson, an earthwork on the Neuse opposite the town, and garrisoned by 300 men of the 92d New York. After a bombardment of several hours Pettigrew withdrew and Hill abandoned the project. During the action the gun-boats Hetzel and Hunchback opened upon the Confederate batteries, drove the enemy from the field, and covered the landing of the 85th New York, in aid of the garrison. On January 30th, 1864, an expedition, under General George E. Pickett, set out from Kinston, North C
May 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 13.93
by 300: men armed with rifles and cutlasses, under Colonel John Taylor Wood. On the night of February 1st Wood's force boarded the Underwriter as she lay at anchor in the Neuse under the guns of Fort Stevenson, killing her commander, Acting Master Jacob Westervelt, and three of the crew, and capturing a third of the remainder. Finding the boilers of the Underwriter cold, Colonel Wood set fire to the vessel. After some skirmishing General Pickett abandoned the enterprise on the 3d. On May 5th, 1864, a third demonstration was made against New Berne, but the Confederates retired without having accomplished any results of importance.--editors. General Hoke was placed in command of the land forces, and Captain J. W. Cooke received orders to cooperate with the Albemarle, an iron-clad then nearly finished. Accordingly Hoke's division proceeded to the vicinity of Plymouth and surrounded the town from the river above to the river below, and preparation was made to storm the forts and brea
February 1st (search for this): chapter 13.93
s of which were garrisoned by 3000 men under General I. N. Palmer. A flotilla, composed of the steamers Lockwood, Commodore Hull, and Underwriter, under Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. Graves, was stationed in the Neuse and the Trent. General Pickett's force consisted of three brigades of infantry, 14 guns, and 600 cavalry, in all numbering about 4500 men, and a fleet of ten row-boats, manned by 300: men armed with rifles and cutlasses, under Colonel John Taylor Wood. On the night of February 1st Wood's force boarded the Underwriter as she lay at anchor in the Neuse under the guns of Fort Stevenson, killing her commander, Acting Master Jacob Westervelt, and three of the crew, and capturing a third of the remainder. Finding the boilers of the Underwriter cold, Colonel Wood set fire to the vessel. After some skirmishing General Pickett abandoned the enterprise on the 3d. On May 5th, 1864, a third demonstration was made against New Berne, but the Confederates retired without havin
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