hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,015 total hits in 158 results.

... 11 12 13 14 15 16
1. Only a few officers were intrusted with the secret; the men had no knowledge of their route. Quietly they passed down the Delaware to the ocean, on a beautiful April evening, and entered the waters of Virginia between its great Capes, Charles and Henry. Marshall Lefferts. Informed of batteries near Alexandria, and findi ascertained that Baltimore was within his Military Department, and, with a plan of bold operations teeming his brain, he returned to Annapolis. At the close of April, General Butler had full ten thousand men under his command at Annapolis, and an equal number were guarding the seat of Government. Already the Unionists of Maryl, restricted their service to three months. See notes 2 and 3, page 836. full one hundred and fifty thousand of whom were organized or were forming at the close of April. The response to this was equally if not more remarkable. The enthusiasm of the people was unbounded. Money and men were offered in greater abundance than the G
o miles, and then backed as slowly to the Relay House, and past it, and at twilight had backed to the Camden Street Station in Baltimore. Intensely black clouds in the van of an approaching thunder-storm were brooding over the city, threatening a Federal Hill in May, 1861. this is a view of Federal Hill before General Butler occupied it. It was so named, because, upon its summit, there was a grand celebration in honor of the final ratification of the Federal or National Constitution, in 1788. it overlooks the harbor; and upon it was a telegraphic station, the old-fashioned semaphorie apparatus being used. It is seen toward the left of the picture. fierce tempest, and few persons were abroad, or aware of this portentous arrival. The Mayor was informed of it in the course of the evening, and at once wrote a note to General Butler, saying that the sudden arrival of a large body of troops would create much surprise, and he would like to know whether the General intended to remain
nine miles of Baltimore, seized the railway station there, spread over the hills in scouting parties, and prepared to plant cannon so as to command the Washington Junction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway at the great viaduct The Relay House in 1864. over the Patapsco Valley, and the roads leading to Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. General Butler accompanied the troops, and established a camp on the hills, a quarter of a mile from the Relay House, near the residences of P. O'Hern and J. H. Luckett. The writer visited this interesting spot late in 1864. Brigadier-General John R. Kenly, whose meritorious services in Baltimore will be noticed presently, was then in command there. On the bights back of the Relay House, near which General Butler encamped, was a regular earthwork, called Fort Dix, and a substantial block-house built of timber, which is seen in our little picture. It was a commanding position, overlooking the narrow valley of the Patapsco above the viaduct toward Ellicot
graphed to Baltimore, and published in an extra. Has God sent you to preach the sword, or to preach Christ? your Mother. The son replied:-- Boston, April 22, 1861. dear Mother:--God has sent me not only to preach the sword, but to use it. When this Government tumbles, look amongst the ruins for your Star-Spangled banner son. and within ten days from the time of its departure, full ten thousand men of the city of New York were on the march toward the Capital. John Sherman, now (1865) United States Senator from Ohio, was then an aid-de-camp of General Patterson. He was sent by that officer to lay before General Scott the advantages of the Annapolis route, suggested by General Patterson. The route was approved of by the Lieutenant-General. See A Narrative of the Campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah: by Robert Patterson, late Major-General of Volunteers. The Massachusetts regiment had been joined at Springfield by a company under Captain H. S. Briggs, and now num
to whom the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus was denied, were confined in Fort Lafayette alone. The Government not only resorted to these extreme measures, but made greater preparations for a conflict of arms, plainly perceiving that insurrection was rapidly assuming the proportions of formidable and extended rebellion. By a proclamation on the 27th of April, the blockade See page 872. was extended to the ports of North Carolina and Virginia; and by another proclamation on the 3d of May, the President called into the service of the United States forty-two thousand volunteers for three years; ordered an increase of the regular Army of twenty-two thousand seven hundred and fourteen officers and enlisted men, for not less than one year nor more than three years; and for the enlistment of eighteen thousand seamen for the naval service. This was the first call for volunteers, the former requisition being for the militia of the several States, The Act of 1795, under the aut
to action. A Home Guard of Unionists was formed in Frederick, under the direct observation of the disloyal Legislature. Similar action was taken in other parts of the State, especially in the more northern portion; and, on the evening of the 4th of May, an immense Union meeting was held in Baltimore, whereat the creation of the Board of Public Safety and other revolutionary acts of the Legislature were heartily condemned. On the same day, Otho Scott, Robert McLane, and W. J. Ross, a Committe at once, with a few men, what the Lieutenant-General, with more caution, had proposed to do at some indefinite time in the future, with twelve thousand men, namely, seize and hold the city of Baltimore. Accordingly, on Saturday afternoon, the 4th of May, while the Commissioners of the Maryland Legislature were protesting before the President against Butler's occupation of their political capital, he issued orders for the Eighth New York and Sixth Massachusetts regiments, with Major A. M. Cook'
ation on the 3d of May, the President called into the service of the United States forty-two thousand volunteers for three years; ordered an increase of the regular Army of twenty-two thousand seven hundred and fourteen officers and enlisted men, for not less than one year nor more than three years; and for the enlistment of eighteen thousand seamen for the naval service. This was the first call for volunteers, the former requisition being for the militia of the several States, The Act of 1795, under the authority of which the President called for seventy-five thousand militia, restricted their service to three months. See notes 2 and 3, page 836. full one hundred and fifty thousand of whom were organized or were forming at the close of April. The response to this was equally if not more remarkable. The enthusiasm of the people was unbounded. Money and men were offered in greater abundance than the Government seemed to need. The voluntary contributions offered to the public tre
izing Baltimore. Meanwhile General Patterson, anxious to vindicate the dignity and honor of his Government, and to teach the secessionists of Maryland a practical lesson of its power, and compel them to submit to lawful authority, sent the. First Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery (Seventeenth in the line) and Sherman's Battery, in all nine hundred and thirty men, under the command of his son, Francis E. Patterson, to force a passage through Baltimore. These troops left Philadelphia on the 8th of May, and on the following morning, accompanied by a portion of the Third Infantry Regiment of regulars from Texas, embarked on the steamers Fanny Cadwalader and Maryland, and went down Chesapeake Bay. The whole force under Colonel Patterson was about twelve hundred. They debarked at Locust Point, near Fort McHenry, under cover of the guns of the Harriet Lane and a small gunboat, at about four o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, in the presence of the Mayor of Baltimore, the Police Comm
... 11 12 13 14 15 16