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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
all had gone over the Hudson — the New York Seventh and Massachusetts Eighth--and crossed New Jersey by railway to the banks rt Patterson, late Major-General of Volunteers. The Massachusetts regiment had been joined at Springfield by a company unaryland, and call the State to account for the death of Massachusetts men, my friends and neighbors. If Colonel Lefferts thiment, or rashness. Report of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts, December 31, 1861, page 22. Butler left Philadelphependence, was built in Boston, and was first manned by Massachusetts men; now she was preserved to the uses of the Governmene sovereignty she had gallantly fought, by the hands of Massachusetts men. This, said General Butler, in an order thanking thurs both regiments worked faithfully, but in vain. The Massachusetts Landing at the Naval Academy in this view the builnspired since it was written, twelve hours before. The Massachusetts Sixth had again marched through Baltimore, not, as befo
Elkton (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
iage. This was to fire grape, canister, and chain shot, while a garrison of sixty men inside would have an opportunity to employ musketry, through holes pierced in the sides and ends for the purpose. General Scott planned a grand campaign against Baltimore. I suppose, he said, in a letter to General Butler, General Patterson, and others, April 29, 1861. that a column from this place [Washington] of three thousand men, another from York of three thousand men, a third from Perryville, or Elkton, by land or water, or both, of three thousand men, and a fourth from Annapolis, by water, of three thousand men, might suffice. Twelve thousand men, it was thought, might be wanted for the enterprise. They were not in hand, for at least ten thousand troops were yet needed at the capital, to give it perfect security. The Lieutenant-General thought some time must elapse before the expedition could be under-taken against the rebellious city. General Butler had other views. He had become
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Government was furnished with such positive evidence of active sympathy with the insurgents that the offenders became exceedingly cautious and far less mischievous. At about the same time, the necessity for arresting and imprisoning seditious persons in the Free-labor States seemed clear to the apprehension of the Government, and such were made on simply the warrant of the Secretary of State. These offenders were confined in Fort McHenry, at Baltimore; Fort Lafayette, near New York, and Fort Warren, in Boston harbor. Writs of habeas corpus were issued for their release. At first some of them were obeyed, but finally, by order of the Government, they were disregarded, and their issue ceased. The most notable of these cases, at the beginning, was that of John Merryman, a member of the Maryland Legislature, who was cast into Fort McHenry late in May. The Chief-Justice of the United States (R. B. Taney), residing in Baltimore, took action in the matter, but General Cadwalader, the c
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
rnished with such positive evidence of active sympathy with the insurgents that the offenders became exceedingly cautious and far less mischievous. At about the same time, the necessity for arresting and imprisoning seditious persons in the Free-labor States seemed clear to the apprehension of the Government, and such were made on simply the warrant of the Secretary of State. These offenders were confined in Fort McHenry, at Baltimore; Fort Lafayette, near New York, and Fort Warren, in Boston harbor. Writs of habeas corpus were issued for their release. At first some of them were obeyed, but finally, by order of the Government, they were disregarded, and their issue ceased. The most notable of these cases, at the beginning, was that of John Merryman, a member of the Maryland Legislature, who was cast into Fort McHenry late in May. The Chief-Justice of the United States (R. B. Taney), residing in Baltimore, took action in the matter, but General Cadwalader, the commander of the d
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ance by the Federal Government of the fact, that the city and all the well-intentioned portion of its inhabitants are loyal to the Union and the Constitution, and are to be so regarded and treated by all. How came Butler and his men on Federal Hill? was a question upon thousands of lips on that eventful morning. They had moved stealthily from the station in the gloom, at half-past 7 in the evening, piloted by Colonel Robert Hare, of Ellicott's Mills, and Captain McConnell, through Lee, Hanover,, Montgomery, and Light Streets, to the foot of Federal Hill. The night was intensely dark, made so by the impending storm. The flashes of lightning and peals of thunder were terrific, but the rain was withheld until they had nearly reached their destination. Then it came like a flood, just as they commenced the ascent of the declivity. The spectacle was grand, said the General to the writer, while on the Ben Deford, lying off Fort Fisher one pleasant evening in December, 1864. I was th
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
terrace at the junction of the freestone pavement and the grassy slope of the glacis, as seen in the picture; and there for months, Government bakeries at the Capitol. smoke poured forth in dense black columns like the issues of a smoldering volcano Before the summer had begun Washington City was an immense garrisoned town, and strong fortifications were rapidly growing upon the hills around it. And yet the conspirators still dreamed of possessing it. Two days after their Convention at Montgomery adjourned to meet in Richmond on the 20th of July, Alexander H. Stephens, in a speech at Atlanta, May 23, 1861. in Georgia, after referring to the occupation of the National edifices at Washington by the soldiery, said:--Their filthy spoliation of the public buildings and the works of art at the Capitol, and their preparations to destroy them, are strong evidences to my mind that they do not intend to hold or defend that place, but to abandon it, after having despoiled and laid it in ruin
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ommerce of the United States; extinguished the lights of light-houses and beacons along the coasts of the Slave-labor States, from Hampton Roads to the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirteen States, and large numbers of leading politicians in other States. Insurrection had become rebellion; and the loyal people of the country, and the National Government, beginning to comprehend the magnitude and potency of the movement, accepted it as such, and addressed themselves earnestly to the task of its suppression. Tail-piece — Light extinguishe
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ng at the ferry was brilliant with flags. Already the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, Colonel Timothy Monroe, See pages 401 and 402. accompanied by General Benjamin F. Butler, one of the most remarkable men of our time, had passed through the vast throng that was waiting for the New York Seventh, and being greeted with hearty huzzas and the gift of scores of little banners by the people. At sunset all had gone over the Hudson — the New York Seventh and Massachusetts Eighth--and crossed New Jersey by railway to the banks of the Delaware. It had been a Private of the Seventh Regiment.. day of fearful excitement in New York, and the night was one of more fearful anxiety. Slumber was wooed in vain by hundreds, for they knew that their loved ones, now that blood had been spilt, were hurrying on toward great peril. Regiment after regiment followed the Seventh in quick succession, The enthusiasm of the people — of the young men in particular — was wonderful. Sometimes several br<
Perryville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
upont, commandant of the Navy Yard there, was also consulted, and it was agreed that the troops should go by water from Perryville, at the mouth of the Susquehanna River, to Annapolis, and thence across Maryland to Washington City. Butler was ordereesident of the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railway Company placed their great steam ferry-boat Maryland, at Perryville, at his disposal; and two companies were ordered to go forward early in the morning and take possession of it. Word cam, and marched toward the ferry, in expectation of a fight. Rumor had been untrue. There were no insurgents in arms at Perryville or Havre de Grace; and there lay the powerful ferry-boat in the quiet possession of her regular crew. The troops were that a column from this place [Washington] of three thousand men, another from York of three thousand men, a third from Perryville, or Elkton, by land or water, or both, of three thousand men, and a fourth from Annapolis, by water, of three thousand
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
altimore. These troops left Philadelphia on the 8th of May, and on the following morning, accompanied by a portion of the Third Infantry Regiment of regulars from Texas, embarked on the steamers Fanny Cadwalader and Maryland, and went down Chesapeake Bay. The whole force under Colonel Patterson was about twelve hundred. They deb the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirteen States, and large numbers of leading politicians in other States. Insurrection had become rebellion; and the loyal people of the country, and the National Government, begi
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