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Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ield, twenty-five thousand of whom were at that period concentrating in Virginia; sent emissaries abroad, with the name of Commissioners, to seek recognition and aid from foreign powers; commissioned numerous pirates to prey upon the commerce of the United States; extinguished the lights of light-houses and beacons along the coasts of the Slave-labor States, from Hampton Roads to the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirteen States, and large numbers of leading politicians in other States. Insurrection had become rebellion; and the loyal people
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment, when on its way to the insurgent camp at Harper's Ferry, and was placed in position to guard the viaduct over the Patuxent of the W hold it, so as to cut the secessionists off from facile communication with Harper's Ferry. It was granted. He then inquired, what were the powers of a General comm in 1864. over the Patapsco Valley, and the roads leading to Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. General Butler accompanied the troops, and established a camp on the hillso above the viaduct toward Ellicott's mills, up which passes the railway to Harper's Ferry, and the expanding valley and beautifully rolling country below the viaductmore, prevent armed insurgents from going to join those already in force at Harper's Ferry, and to look after a large quantity of gunpowder said to be stored in a chulonging to the General and his staff, were on a train of cars headed toward Harper's Ferry. Before this train was a short one, bearing fifty men, who were ordered up
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ommerce of the United States; extinguished the lights of light-houses and beacons along the coasts of the Slave-labor States, from Hampton Roads to the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirteen States, and large numbers of leading politicians in other States. Insurrection had become rebellion; and the loyal people of the country, and the National Government, beginning to comprehend the magnitude and potency of the movement, accepted it as such, and addressed themselves earnestly to the task of its suppression. Tail-piece — Light extinguishe
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ar Mother:--God has sent me not only to preach the sword, but to use it. When this Government tumbles, look amongst the ruins for your Star-Spangled banner son. and within ten days from the time of its departure, full ten thousand men of the city of New York were on the march toward the Capital. John Sherman, now (1865) United States Senator from Ohio, was then an aid-de-camp of General Patterson. He was sent by that officer to lay before General Scott the advantages of the Annapolis route, al. In the midst of the wild tumult, caused by the call to arms — the braying of trumpets and the roll of drums — the representatives of a sect of exemplary Christians, who had ever borne testimony against the practices of war, met in the City of New York (April 23), and reiterated that testimony. That sect was the Society of Friends, or Quakers. They put forth an Address to their brethren, counseling them to beware of the temptations of the hour, and to pray for divine blessings on their c
South river (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Already the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, Colonel Timothy Monroe, See pages 401 and 402. accompanied by General Benjamin F. Butler, one of the most remarkable men of our time, had passed through the vast throng that was waiting for the New York Seventh, and being greeted with hearty huzzas and the gift of scores of little banners by the people. At sunset all had gone over the Hudson — the New York Seventh and Massachusetts Eighth--and crossed New Jersey by railway to the banks of the Delaware. It had been a Private of the Seventh Regiment.. day of fearful excitement in New York, and the night was one of more fearful anxiety. Slumber was wooed in vain by hundreds, for they knew that their loved ones, now that blood had been spilt, were hurrying on toward great peril. Regiment after regiment followed the Seventh in quick succession, The enthusiasm of the people — of the young men in particular — was wonderful. Sometimes several brothers would enlist at the same time. Th<
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
nt treachery around him, and assured by the Secretary of War that Maryland troops would not be ordered out of the State, issued a proclamation calling for the four regiments named in the Secretary's requisition for militia as the quota of that Commonwealth. Thenceforth the tongues of loyal Marylanders were unloosed, and treason became weaker every hour; and their State was soon numbered among the stanchest of loyal Commonwealths, outstripping in practical patriotism Delaware, Kentucky, and Missouri. On that eventful 14th of May, the veteran Major W. W. Morris, in command at Fort McHenry. near Baltimore (which had lately been well garrisoned), first gave practical force to the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, which the exigency of the times seemed to give constitutional sanction for. The second clause of the ninth section of the first Article of the National Constitution says:--The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
that city. It was now impossible to do so with less than ten thousand armed men. He counseled with Major-General Robert Patterson, who had just been appointed commander of the Department of Washington, which embraced the States of Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland, and the District of Columbia, and whose Headquarters were at Philadelphia. Commodore Dupont, commandant of the Navy Yard there, was also consulted, and it was agreed that the troops should go by water from Perryville, at the moutthe quota of that Commonwealth. Thenceforth the tongues of loyal Marylanders were unloosed, and treason became weaker every hour; and their State was soon numbered among the stanchest of loyal Commonwealths, outstripping in practical patriotism Delaware, Kentucky, and Missouri. On that eventful 14th of May, the veteran Major W. W. Morris, in command at Fort McHenry. near Baltimore (which had lately been well garrisoned), first gave practical force to the suspension of the privilege of the wri
Federal Hill (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ere brooding over the city, threatening a Federal Hill in May, 1861. this is a view of Federal Federal Hill before General Butler occupied it. It was so named, because, upon its summit, there was a grand the columns of the faithful Clipper, dated Federal Hill, Baltimore, May 14, 1861, in which it was ad by all. How came Butler and his men on Federal Hill? was a question upon thousands of lips on ntgomery, and Light Streets, to the foot of Federal Hill. The night was intensely dark, made so by that slow-moving Butler's Headquarters on Federal Hill. column appear like a tongue of flame, andrbance of any kind. The arms were taken to Federal Hill, and from there to Fort McHenry. cast Ross (Zouave), Colonel Abraham Duryee, occupied Federal Hill, and thereon built the strong earthwork known as Fort Federal Hill, whose cannon commanded both the town and Fort McHenry. The 14th of May w Maryland soldier. This was also done on Federal Hill, a few days before the arrival of General B
Ellicotts Mills (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
e built of timber, which is seen in our little picture. It was a commanding position, overlooking the narrow valley of the Patapsco above the viaduct toward Ellicott's mills, up which passes the railway to Harper's Ferry, and the expanding valley and beautifully rolling country below the viaduct, wherein may be seen, nestling at ice, in connection with a company of the New York Eighth and two guns of the Boston Light Artillery, all under Major Cook, in capturing Winans's steam-gun at Ellicott's Mills, May 10, 1861. together with Dickinson, See page 440. Winans was an aged man, a thorough secessionist, and worth, it was estimated, about fifteen millionof lips on that eventful morning. They had moved stealthily from the station in the gloom, at half-past 7 in the evening, piloted by Colonel Robert Hare, of Ellicott's Mills, and Captain McConnell, through Lee, Hanover,, Montgomery, and Light Streets, to the foot of Federal Hill. The night was intensely dark, made so by the impe
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
y. Just as it was about to march, it received intelligence of the attack on the Massachusetts Sixth, in the streets of Baltimore. Forty-eight rounds of ball-cartridges were served out to each man, and then they moved through Fourth Street into Broadway, and down that great thoroughfare to Courtlandt Street and the Jersey City Ferry. The side-walks all the way were densely packed with men, women, and children. Banners were streaming everywhere. Banners from balcony, banners from steeple, Banl 19, 1861. and they were hailed as the harbingers of positive safety for the Capital. Although they were wearied and footsore, they marched up Pennsylvania Avenue with the firm and united step which always characterized their parade marches in Broadway, and halted only when they arrived at the front of the White House, whither they went to pay homage to the President, whom they had come to protect and support. Their discipline and fine appearance were a marvel, and loyal crowds followed them
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