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Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
and their colleagues defied the power of the traitors who controlled the Convention. Before the adjournment of that Convention, the inhabitants of Northwestern Virginia were satisfied that the time had come when they must make a bold stand for the Union and their own independence, or be made slaves to a confederacy of traitors whom they abhorred; and Union meetings were called in various parts of the mountain region, which were largely attended. The first of these assembled at Clarksburg, in Harrison County, on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway, on the 22d of April, when resolutions, offered by John S. Carlile, a member of the Convention yet sitting in Richmond, calling an assembly of delegates of the people at Wheeling, on the 13th of May, were adopted. The course of Governor Letcher was severely condemned, and eleven citizens were chosen to represent Harrison County in the Convention at Wheeling. Meetings were held elsewhere. One of these, at Kingwood, in Preston Count
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
navigation of that stream, and preventing supplies for the army near the Capital being borne upon its waters. This speedily led to hostilities at the mouth of Acquia Creek, fifty-five miles below Washington City, and the terminus of the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railway, where the insurgents had erected batteries to c insurgent soldiers. He then proceeded to patrol the River, reconnoitering its banks in search of batteries; and on the 31st of the month he attacked those at Acquia Creek, in which service the Freeborn was assisted by the gunboats Anacosta and resolute of his flotilla. For two hours an incessant discharge upon the batteries was Acquia Creek landing, with the shore battery, is seen in the foreground, with the bluffs rising back of it. The spectator is looking toward the northwest, up Acquia Creek, at the mouth of which is seen a sloop. The line of intrenchments is seen on the bluffs back of the landing. ceased. The Pawnee became the chief object of t
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
column was to cross at the Aqueduct Bridge, at Georgetown; another at the Long Bridge, at Washington; and a third was to proceed in vessels, and seize the city of Alexandria. The three invading columns moved almost simultaneously. The one at Georgetown was commanded by General Irvin McDowell. Some local volunteers crossed first, and drove the insurgent pickets from the Virginia end of the Aqueduct Bridge. These were followed by the Fifth Massachusetts; the Twenty-eighth New York, from Brooklyn; Company B of the United States Cavalry; and the Sixty-ninth New York, which was an Irish regiment, under Colonel Michael Corcoran. Their march across that lofty structure, in the bright light of a full moon, was a beautiful spectacle. Thousands of anxious men and women saw the gleaming of their bayonets and the waving of their banners, and heard the sounds of their measured foot-falls borne on the still night air, with the deepest emotions, for it was the first initial act of an opening
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
was a civil and political movement in Northwestern Virginia at this time, in opposition to the conof that Convention, the inhabitants of Northwestern Virginia were satisfied that the time had come lared that the separation of Western from Eastern Virginia was essential to the maintenance of theirargumentative address to the people of Northwestern Virginia. these proceedings thoroughly alarmhat the functions of all officers in the State of Virginia who adhered to it were suspended, and thf the ultimate separation of Western from Eastern Virginia. On that day, the new or restored Governregiments of the loyal mountaineers of Northwestern Virginia had rallied beneath the standard of thing of the efforts of the loyal men of Northwestern Virginia to lay the foundation of a New and Freforcements were not speedily sent into Northwestern Virginia, that section would be lost to the Con appeal from Philippi to the people of Northwestern Virginia, begging them to stand by the legally [2 more...]
Shenandoah Valley (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ace of the Confederates, preparatory to a march on the Capital, was Manassas Junction, a point on the Orange and Alexandria Railway, where another joins it from Manassas Gap in the Blue Ridge, about twenty-five miles west from Alexandria, and thirty in a direct line from Washington City. This was a most important strategic point in the plans of the conspirators, as it commanded the grand Southern railway route, connecting Washington and Richmond, and another leading to the fertile valley of the Shenandoah, beyond the Blue Ridge. General Butler had already suggested Mississippi Rifleman. the Mississippi riflemen were renowned as destructive sharp-shooters during the war. In addition to their rifle, they carried a sheath-knife, known as the Bowie-knife, in their belt. This is a formidable weapon in a hand-to-hand fight, when wielded by men expert in its use, as many were in the southwestern States, where it was generally seen in murderous frays in the streets and bar-rooms. Its
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
estion relieved the Government and the loyal Virginians from all restraints; and while Ohio and Indiana troops were moving toward the border, the patriots of Western Virginia, and especially of the Ral T. A. Morris. In a brief speech at the Bates House, he assured the assembled thousands that Indiana troops would be called upon to follow him and win distinction. Indiana's Roll of honor: by DIndiana's Roll of honor: by David Stevenson, Librarian of Indiana, page 89. two days afterward, May 26, 1861. he issued an address to the Union George B. McClellan. citizens of Western Virginia, in which he praised their couIndiana, page 89. two days afterward, May 26, 1861. he issued an address to the Union George B. McClellan. citizens of Western Virginia, in which he praised their courage and patriotism, and warned them that the few factious rebels in their midst, who had lately attempted to deprive them of their rights at the polls, were seeking to inaugurate a reign of terror, anged in two columns, commanded respectively by Colonels Kelley, of Virginia, and E. Dumont, of Indiana. Kelley's column was composed of his own regiment (the first Virginia), the Ninth Indiana, Col
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 20
riflemen were renowned as destructive sharp-shooters during the war. In addition to their rifle, they carried a sheath-knife, known as the Bowie-knife, in their belt. This is a formidable weapon in a hand-to-hand fight, when wielded by men expert in its use, as many were in the southwestern States, where it was generally seen in murderous frays in the streets and bar-rooms. Its origin is connected with an incident in the life of Colonel Bowie, who was engaged in the revolt of Texas against Mexico, in 1835 and 1836. his sword-blade was broken in an encounter, when he converted the remainder into a stout sharp-pointed knife, and the weapon became very popular. See note 1, page 266. to General Scott the propriety of sending National troops to occupy that very position before a Confederate soldier had appeared, Parton's Butler in New Orleans, page 105. knowing that Washington City could be more easily defended at that distance from it, than by troops and batteries on Arlington High
Wood County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Government. the delegates all took the following oath:--we solemnly declare that we will support the Constitution of the United States, and the laws made in pursuance thereof, as the supreme law of the land, any thing in the Ordinance of the Convention that assembled at Richmond on the 13th day of February last to the contrary notwithstanding. So help me God. Room in which the Convention met at Wheeling. the Convention was organized by the appointment of Arthur J. Boreman, of Wood County, as permanent President, and G. L. Cranmer, Secretary. The President made a patriotic speech on taking the chair, and found the delegates in full Union with him in sentiment. The Convention then went to work in earnest. A committee was appointed to draw up a bill of rights, and on the following day it reported through its chairman, John S. Carlile. All allegiance to the Southern Confederacy was totally denied in that report, and it recommended a Declaration that the functions of all o
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
, with the greatest possible haste and in the greatest possible numbers. At the beginning of May there were sixteen thousand of them on their way to Virginia or within its borders, and, with the local troops of that Commonwealth, were pressing on toward Washington, or to important points of communication with it. At the same time measures were on foot at Montgomery for organizing an army of one hundred thousand men. Message of Jefferson Davis to the Congress of the Confederate States of America, April 29, 1861. The enthusiasm among the young men of the ruling class in the South was equal to that of the young men of the North. Notwithstanding the proclamation of the President, calling for seventy-five thousand men, was read by crowds, on the bulletin-boards of the telegraph-offices in every town, with roars of laughter and derision, and cheers for the great rail-splitter Abraham, as one of their chroniclers avers, and few believed that there would be war, companies were formed
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
nto Fairfax Court House the Unionists in Western Virginia, 488. Union Convention at Wheeling alarernment of Virginia reorganized, 491. State of West Virginia, 492. troops ordered to Western VirgiWestern Virginia, 493. insurgents in Western Virginia, 494. March against the insurgents at Philippi, 495. batse aggressive movements, and by others in Western Virginia, took active measures to oppose them. Thof the labor and thrift of the citizens of West Virginia. These considerations, and their innate lxpected a revolt and an appeal to arms in Western Virginia, under the auspices of the National Goverthe State in its favor, while the vote in Western Virginia was overwhelmingly against it. A Conventi diameter. On one side are the words, State of West Virginia, and Montana Semper Liberi --that is tmoving toward the border, the patriots of Western Virginia, and especially of the River counties, rut when they had assisted the loyal men of Western Virginia until they could protect themselves, then[9 more...]
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