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C. D. Hubbard (search for this): chapter 20
ich, too informal to take definite action on the momentous question of the dismemberment of the State, contented itself with passing resolutions condemnatory of the Secession Ordinance, and calling a Provisional Convention to assemble at the same place on the 11th day of June following, if the obnoxious Ordinance should be ratified by the voice of the people, to be given on the 23d of May. A Central Committee was appointed, that Committee consisted of John S. Carlile, James S. Wheat, C. D. Hubbard, F. H. Pierpont, G. R. Latham, Andrew Wilson, S. H. Woodward, James W. Paxton, and Campbell Farr. who, on the 22d of May, issued an argumentative address to the people of Northwestern Virginia. these proceedings thoroughly alarmed the conspirators, who expected a revolt and an appeal to arms in Western Virginia, under the auspices of the National Government; and on the 25th of May, Governor Letcher wrote a letter to Colonel Porterfield, who was in command of some State troops at Graft
John Sherman (search for this): chapter 20
ch of the Potomac, near the Navy Yard, were embarked on two schooners and taken to Alexandria; while the first Michigan Regiment, Colonel Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry commanded by Major Stoneman, and two pieces of Sherman's Battery Sherman's Battery, which, as we have observed, accompanied the Pennsylvania troops under Colonel Patterson (see page 445), consisted of six pieces. The whole Battery crossed the long Bridge on this occasion but only four of the pieSherman's Battery, which, as we have observed, accompanied the Pennsylvania troops under Colonel Patterson (see page 445), consisted of six pieces. The whole Battery crossed the long Bridge on this occasion but only four of the pieces were taken to Arlington Hights. in charge of Lieutenant Ransom, marched for the same destination New Jersey State militia. by way of the long Bridge. The troops moving by land and water reached Alexandria at about the same time. The National frigate Pawnee was lying off the town, and her commander had already been in negotiation for the evacuation of Alexandria by the insurgents. A detachment of her crew, bearing a flag of truce, now hastened to the shore in boats, and leaped eagerly
Robert Patterson (search for this): chapter 20
an time, the New York fire Zouave Regiment, see page 429. under Colonel Ephraim E. Ellsworth, who had been encamped on the east branch of the Potomac, near the Navy Yard, were embarked on two schooners and taken to Alexandria; while the first Michigan Regiment, Colonel Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry commanded by Major Stoneman, and two pieces of Sherman's Battery Sherman's Battery, which, as we have observed, accompanied the Pennsylvania troops under Colonel Patterson (see page 445), consisted of six pieces. The whole Battery crossed the long Bridge on this occasion but only four of the pieces were taken to Arlington Hights. in charge of Lieutenant Ransom, marched for the same destination New Jersey State militia. by way of the long Bridge. The troops moving by land and water reached Alexandria at about the same time. The National frigate Pawnee was lying off the town, and her commander had already been in negotiation for the evacuation of Ale
John Jay Crittenden (search for this): chapter 20
ere arranged in two columns, commanded respectively by Colonels Kelley, of Virginia, and E. Dumont, of Indiana. Kelley's column was composed of his own regiment (the first Virginia), the Ninth Indiana, Colonel Milroy, and a portion of the Sixteenth Ohio, under Colonel Irwin. Dumont's column consisted of eight companies of his own regiment (the Seventh Indiana) ; four companies of the Fourteenth Ohio, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Steedman; four companies of the Sixth Indiana, under Colonel Crittenden, and a detachment of Burnet's Ohio Artillery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Sturgis. Dumont's column was accompanied by the gallant Colonel F. W. Lander, who was then a Volunteer aid on General McClellan's staff, and represented him. the two columns were to March upon Philippi by converging routes. Both left Grafton on the afternoon of the 2d; Kelley's for Thornton, a few miles eastward, and Dumont's for Webster, a few miles westward. Kelley was to strike the Beverly road above Philip
Irvin McDowell (search for this): chapter 20
Bridge, at Georgetown; another at the Long Bridge, at Washington; and a third was to proceed in vessels, and seize the city of Alexandria. The three invading columns moved almost simultaneously. The one at Georgetown was commanded by General Irvin McDowell. Some local volunteers crossed first, and drove the insurgent pickets from the Virginia end of the Aqueduct Bridge. These were followed by the Fifth Massachusetts; the Twenty-eighth New York, from Brooklyn; Company B of the United Statehe frightened inhabitants of Fairfax County that no one, peaceably inclined, should be molested, and he exhorted the fugitives to return to their homes and resume their accustomed avocations. Two days afterward, May 27. he was succeeded by General McDowell, of the regular Army, who was appointed to the command of all the National forces then in Virginia. Colonel Wilcox, who was in command at Alexandria, was succeeded by Colonel Charles P. Stone, who, as we have observed, had been in charge of
S. H. Woodward (search for this): chapter 20
uestion of the dismemberment of the State, contented itself with passing resolutions condemnatory of the Secession Ordinance, and calling a Provisional Convention to assemble at the same place on the 11th day of June following, if the obnoxious Ordinance should be ratified by the voice of the people, to be given on the 23d of May. A Central Committee was appointed, that Committee consisted of John S. Carlile, James S. Wheat, C. D. Hubbard, F. H. Pierpont, G. R. Latham, Andrew Wilson, S. H. Woodward, James W. Paxton, and Campbell Farr. who, on the 22d of May, issued an argumentative address to the people of Northwestern Virginia. these proceedings thoroughly alarmed the conspirators, who expected a revolt and an appeal to arms in Western Virginia, under the auspices of the National Government; and on the 25th of May, Governor Letcher wrote a letter to Colonel Porterfield, who was in command of some State troops at Grafton, at the junction of the Baltimore and Ohio and the Northwe
B. F. Kelley (search for this): chapter 20
arge, and, in conjunction with those under Colonel Kelley and others in Virginia, drive out the Confe Confederates. on the evening of the 27th, Kelley reached Buffalo Creek, in Marion County, when from Grafton. He had destroyed two bridges in Kelley's path toward Grafton, but these were soon rebis efforts were almost fruitless. while Colonel Kelley was pressing toward Grafton, the Ohio and lley, of Virginia, and E. Dumont, of Indiana. Kelley's column was composed of his own regiment (the Both left Grafton on the afternoon of the 2d; Kelley's for Thornton, a few miles eastward, and Dumont's for Webster, a few miles westward. Kelley was to strike the Beverly road above Philippi, in thur o'clock on the dawn of the 3d. June, 1861. Kelley had to March twenty-two miles, and Dumont twelces in this engagement was the wounding of Colonel Kelley, who was shot through the right breast by recovery seemed almost impossible. say to Colonel Kelley, telegraphed General McClellan from Cincin[7 more...]
Virginians (search for this): chapter 20
were fired upon by some Virginia sentries, who instantly fled from the town. Ellsworth, ignorant of any negotiations, advanced to the center of the city, and took possession of it in the name of his Government, while the column under Wilcox marched through different streets to the Station of the Orange and Alexandria Railway, and seized it, Ellsworth Zouaves. with much rolling stock. They there captured a small company (thirty-five men) of Virginia cavalry, under Captain Ball. Other Virginians, who had heard the firing of the insurgent pickets, escaped by way of the railroad. Alexandria was now in quiet possession of the National troops, but there were many violent secessionists there who would not submit. Among them was a man named Jackson, the proprietor of an inn called the Marshall House. The Confederate flag had been flying over his premises for many days, and had been plainly seen from the President's House in Washington. on the preceding day (May 23d) a Confederat
James S. Wheat (search for this): chapter 20
g Convention, which, too informal to take definite action on the momentous question of the dismemberment of the State, contented itself with passing resolutions condemnatory of the Secession Ordinance, and calling a Provisional Convention to assemble at the same place on the 11th day of June following, if the obnoxious Ordinance should be ratified by the voice of the people, to be given on the 23d of May. A Central Committee was appointed, that Committee consisted of John S. Carlile, James S. Wheat, C. D. Hubbard, F. H. Pierpont, G. R. Latham, Andrew Wilson, S. H. Woodward, James W. Paxton, and Campbell Farr. who, on the 22d of May, issued an argumentative address to the people of Northwestern Virginia. these proceedings thoroughly alarmed the conspirators, who expected a revolt and an appeal to arms in Western Virginia, under the auspices of the National Government; and on the 25th of May, Governor Letcher wrote a letter to Colonel Porterfield, who was in command of some State
imber, and were sometimes used as signal-stations. Block-house. two miles distant from this passing column was another crossing the long Bridge. It consisted of the National Rifles under Captain Smead, and a company of Zouaves under Captain Powell, who drove the insurgent pickets toward Alexandria, and took position at Roach's Spring, a half a mile from the Virginia end of the Bridge. These were immediately followed by the constitutional Guards of the District of Columbia under Captain Digges, who advanced about four miles on the road toward Alexandria. At two o'clock in the morning, a heavy body, composed of the New York Seventh Regiment; three New Jersey regiments (Second, Third, and Fourth), under Brigadier-General Theodore Runyon, and the New York Twelfth and twenty-fifth, passed over. The New York troops were commanded by Major-General Charles W. Theodore Runyon. Sandford, who, at the call of the President, had offered his entire division to the service of the c
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