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Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
cipant in the scenes at Fort Donelson wrote as follows concerning the surrender: One of the grandest sights in the whole siege, and one which comes only once in a century, was the triumphal entry into the Fort on Sunday morning. . . . The sight from the highest point in the fort, commanding a view of both river and camp, was imposing. There were on one side regiment after regiment pouring in, their flags floating gayly in the wind; some of them which had been rent and faded on the fields of Mexico, and others with Springfield emblazoned on their folds; one magnificent brass band pouring out the melodies of Hail Columbia, Star Spangled Banner, Yankee Doodle, etc., in such style as the gazing captives had never heard, even in the palmy days of peace. On the other was a spectacle which surpasses all description. The narrow Cumberland seemed alive with steamers. First came the gun-boats, firing salutes; then came little black tugs, snorting their acclamations; and after them the vast
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
and, better than all, it developed the most gratifying evidences of genuine Union feeling in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. The river banks in places were crowded with men, women, and children, who greeted the old flag with the greatest enthuned to capture Fort Donelson as speedily as possible, and then, with a heavy force, march across Tennessee and penetrate Alabama. Foote had already hurried back to Cairo with the Cincinnati, Essex, and St. Louis, to prepare mortar-boats for the new These consisted of thirteen regiments of Tennessee troops, two of Kentucky, six of Mississippi, one of Texas, two of Alabama, four of Virginia, two independent battalions of Tennessee infantry, and a regiment of cavalry, under the afterward famoa prison, and early in April, 1862, after the battle of Shiloh, it contained full 8,000 captives, most of whom were from Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. The passage of these prisoners through the country to their destinatiog produced a profound se
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
m success in bringing to them the mail, often immense from accumulation, forwarding it promptly, by sea or by land, for distribution. During the campaign of four months against Atlanta, the mail was received with great regularity. On the 13th December, the very day our communication was opened on the Ogeechee River with Admiral Dahlgren's fleet, the mail-boat, with your personal charge, was the first to pass the obstructions and greet the Army of the Tennessee. When our army arrived at Goldsborough, having been marching 500 miles without communication, it found letters from home in waiting, and you were there to welcome us again. From this time till we left Raleigh, en route for Washington, all mail matter was regularly received, and you still provided for us while the army was encamped in sight of the capital. General Sherman, in a letter to General Markland, bore similar testimony. That army mail-service presents to the contemplation of those who comprehend its extent and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
en mad; by nature and art almost impregnable. And within these intrenchments, when Grant appeared before them to make an assault, were more than twenty thousand effective men. These consisted of thirteen regiments of Tennessee troops, two of Kentucky, six of Mississippi, one of Texas, two of Alabama, four of Virginia, two independent battalions of Tennessee infantry, and a regiment of cavalry, under the afterward famous leader Colonel A. B. Forest. With these were artillerymen for manning srs of war (including the sick and wounded), a large proportion of whom were sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago ; Generals Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Henry, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Leading Unionists of Kentucky asked for the surrender of Buckner to the civil authorities of that State, to be tried for treason against that commonwealth. The application was refused, and he was afterward exchanged. Camp Douglas was so named in honor of Senator Douglas,
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
neral O. O. Howard says: For more than a year the Army of the Tennessee has been campaigning in the interior of the Southern States, a great portion of the time far separated from depots of supplies, and connected with home and friends only by a long and uncertain line of railroad, that was, for the most part, overworked to supply provisions, or, moving off without base or lines of communication, the army only touched at points not always previously designated. During all this time, from Chattanooga to Atlanta, from Atlanta to Savannah, and in the homeward campaign across the Carolinas, you, my dear Colonel, have received the warmest thanks from officers and men for your interest, energy, and uniform success in bringing to them the mail, often immense from accumulation, forwarding it promptly, by sea or by land, for distribution. During the campaign of four months against Atlanta, the mail was received with great regularity. On the 13th December, the very day our communication was
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
estinatiog produced a profound sensation. A St. Louis journal mentioned al e arrival there of ten thousand of them, on ten steamers. Prison at camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio. A large number of the captives at Forts Henry and Donelson were also sent to Camp Chase, at Columbus, Ohio, which was so named in honor of the SecretaryColumbus, Ohio, which was so named in honor of the Secretary of the Treasury. The prison there was in the southeast corner of the camp. The strong inclosure was about sixteen feet in height, built of two-inch pine plank, with scantling well bolted and braced. The picture shows the exterior of the prison and the guard-houses. also three thousand horses, forty-eight field-pieces, seventeeated and burned by the Southern troops. From there a detachment advanced as far as the Tennessee River, and thus occupies the principal road between Memphis and Columbus. This movement establishes the troops of General Burnside in the rear of the great army of the Potomac. Elizabeth City, on the Atlantic coast, and the Tennesse
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ciency of knowledge of American geography, The amazing territorial extent of the United States is but little comprehended in Europe, and the relative position of places mentioned in connection with the war seemed to be very little understood, even by some of the best informed writers and speakers. This lack of exact information led writers on American affairs into the most absurd speculations as well as serious blunders. An illustrative example was found in the summary of war news from America in the Paris Moniteur, at about the time we are considering. Speaking of the capture of Roanoke Island, and of Elizabeth City, in Eastern North Carolina Feb., 1862. the writer observed: The Federal army landed, and proceeded toward Elizabeth City, which it found evacuated and burned by the Southern troops. From there a detachment advanced as far as the Tennessee River, and thus occupies the principal road between Memphis and Columbus. This movement establishes the troops of General Burn
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
found in the summary of war news from America in the Paris Moniteur, at about the time we are considering. Speaking of the capture of Roanoke Island, and of Elizabeth City, in Eastern North Carolina Feb., 1862. the writer observed: The Federal army landed, and proceeded toward Elizabeth City, which it found evacuated and burnedElizabeth City, which it found evacuated and burned by the Southern troops. From there a detachment advanced as far as the Tennessee River, and thus occupies the principal road between Memphis and Columbus. This movement establishes the troops of General Burnside in the rear of the great army of the Potomac. Elizabeth City, on the Atlantic coast, and the Tennessee River, at theElizabeth City, on the Atlantic coast, and the Tennessee River, at the point indicated, are fully 750 miles apart, in an air line, and at least 1,200 miles by any route troops might be taken. to satisfy the ruling class that it was of no military importance whatever. In that effort the Commissioners failed. At Richmond the fall of Fort Donelson caused emotions of mingled anger and dismay. The l
nal salutes; and every — where the flag of the Republic was flung to the breeze, in token of profound satisfaction. The news filled the conspirators with despair, and terribly depressed the spirits of the soldiers of the Confederate army. By it Europe was made to doubt the success of the rebellion; and at some courts it produced the first serious thoughts of abandoning the cause of the conspirators. Its effect, in all relations, was similar to that of the capture of Burgoyne and his army at Sners abroad felt compelled to do all in their power to belittle the event, and, by taking advantage of the general deficiency of knowledge of American geography, The amazing territorial extent of the United States is but little comprehended in Europe, and the relative position of places mentioned in connection with the war seemed to be very little understood, even by some of the best informed writers and speakers. This lack of exact information led writers on American affairs into the most a
Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
zed arms and other Confederate property in several places, and caused the flight of a considerable number of troops from Savannah, on the eastern bank of the river, which he had prepared to attack. His reconnoissance was a perfect success. It discoces were crowded with men, women, and children, who greeted the old flag with the greatest enthusiasm. I was assured at Savannah, he said, that, of the several hundred troops there, more than one-half, had we gone to the attack in time, would have he of 250,000 military letters per day. It is believed that this number was exceeded after General Sherman's army reached Savannah, and up to the time of the review of the troops in this city in the month of May, 1865. Taking into consideration, co touched at points not always previously designated. During all this time, from Chattanooga to Atlanta, from Atlanta to Savannah, and in the homeward campaign across the Carolinas, you, my dear Colonel, have received the warmest thanks from officers
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