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Conestoga (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ail service, 224. the Army mail at Washington, 225. a voyage on the Cumberland River, 226. visit to Fort Donelson, 227. Nashville, 229. The fall of Fort Henry was followed by immediate preparations for an attack on Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River. Preparatory to this was a reconnoissance up the Tennessee River. Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps was sent up that river on the evening of the day of battle, Feb. 6, 1862. with a detachment of Foote's flotilla, consisting of the Conestoga, Tyler, and Lexington, to reconnoiter the borders of the stream as far toward its upper waters as possible. When he reached the bridge of the railway between Memphis and Bowling Green, he found the draw closed, its machinery disabled, and some Confederate transports just above it, escaping up the river. A portion of the bridge was then hastily destroyed, and the work of demolition was completed the following day by Commander Walke, of the Carondelet, who was sent up by General Grant for.
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
veloped the most gratifying evidences of genuine Union feeling in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. The river banks in places were crowded with men, women, and cconsisted of thirteen regiments of Tennessee troops, two of Kentucky, six of Mississippi, one of Texas, two of Alabama, four of Virginia, two independent battalions Saturday morning ; Feb. 15. Colonel Baldwin's brigade of three regiments of Mississippi and Tennessee troops in advance, followed by four Virginia regiments, under of Shiloh, it contained full 8,000 captives, most of whom were from Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. The passage of these prisoners through the country to their desuainted with his official conduct. Twenty years hence, says a politician of Mississippi, who was a fellow-worker in rebellion with Davis in Richmond, no one will bery 18th), said: You have continually led the way in the Valley of the Lower Mississippi, the Tennessee, and the Cumberland. You have carried the flag of the Uni
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
is sufferings from the wound in his foot, he would immediately make an attack on Clarksville, an important post about forty miles above. He concluded by saying, We are now firing a National salute from Fort Cairo, General Grant's late post, in honor of the glorious achievement. The women of St. Louis, desirous of testifying their admiration of General Halleck, in whose Department and by whose troops these victories had been achieved (and because of his energy in suppressing secession in Missouri), ordered an elegant sword to be made by Tiffany & Co., of New York, to be presented to him in their name. This was done in the parlor of the Planters' Hotel, in St. Louis, on the evening of the 17th of March, 1862, by Mrs. Helen Budd, who spoke in behalf of the donors. In his brief reply, General Halleck assured the women of St. Louis that it should be used in defense of their happiness, their rights, and their honor, and solely in behalf of justice. The weapon was an elegant one, richl
Stewart (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
f possible, and thus cut off the retreat of the Confederates up the stream. Route from Fort Henry to Fort Donelson Let us observe the character and strength of the works to be assailed, called Fort Donelson. In the center of Stewart County, in Tennessee, was its shire town of Dover, situated on the left bank of the Cumberland River, where that stream, running nearly due north, makes an abrupt turn to the westward, and, after flowing about half a mile, as suddenly turns to the northwarnd was familiar with every foot of the battle-ground. He kindly offered to accompany the writer to the points of interest in connection with the battle, and took him to the house of G. M. Stewart, near the fort, an old and leading citizen of Stewart County, who had been faithful to the old flag, and had suffered much for its sake during the war. Mr. Stewart and his son (who had been in the Union service) kindly offered to go over the field of conflict with us. He furnished saddle-horses for the
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ary of war news from America in the Paris Moniteur, at about the time we are considering. Speaking of the capture of Roanoke Island, and of Elizabeth City, in Eastern North Carolina Feb., 1862. the writer observed: The Federal army landed, and procmissioners failed. At Richmond the fall of Fort Donelson caused emotions of mingled anger and dismay. The loss of Roanoke Island, a few days before, had greatly alarmed and irritated the conspirators; and now the chief of the Confederates, with an a message to his Congress. Official information had not reached him. Enough is known, he said, of the surrender of Roanoke Island to make us feel that it was deeply humiliating. Of the disaster at Fort Donelsonl, he said: I am not only unwilling nd control of Mr. Davis himself, may safely be charged the calamitous occurrences at Forts Donelson and Henry, and at Roanoke Island. --War of the Rebellion, by Henry S. Foote. Generals Grant, McClernand, and Wallace For their services in the
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Floyd and Pillow disgraced, 223. the Army mail service, 224. the Army mail at Washington, 225. a voyage on the Cumberland River, 226. visit to Fort Donelson, 227. Nashville, 229. The fall of Fort Henry was followed by immediate preparations for an attack on Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River. Preparatory to this was a reconnoissance up the Tennessee River. Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps was sent up that river on the evening of the day of battle, Feb. 6, 1862. with a detachmenson. In the center of Stewart County, in Tennessee, was its shire town of Dover, situated on the left bank of the Cumberland River, where that stream, running nearly due north, makes an abrupt turn to the westward, and, after flowing about half a r Tyrone, toward the evening of the 5th. Most of his fellow-passengers, as far as Clarksville, sixty miles down the Cumberland River, consisted of about two hundred colored soldiers, who had just been paid off and discharged from the service. The f
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
f Fort Donelson, at that time. But so it was. Pillow had arrived there on the 10th of the month, Fp the enemy and put him completely to rout. Pillow's report to Captain Clarence Derrick, Assistannot under arms; and so sudden and vigorous was Pillow's attack, that the whole of Grant's right wingrue proportions. A Council of War was held at Pillow's Headquarters, in Dover, at midnight, to consthe Federals: it wouldn't do, it wouldn't do. Pillow then said to Floyd, I will not surrender myselen, sir, said Floyd, I surrender thy command. Pillow, who was next in rank, and to whom Floyd offereir light-fingered Floyd was light-footed too. Pillow sneaked away in the darkness, and, in perfect llace, and subordinate officers; and of Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner, and their subordinates. Also wre disgraceful scene in the midnight council at Pillow's quarters in Dover, when he wrote that apologology. They had been elated beyond measure by Pillow's premature boast of victory, and now the disa[2 more...]
Cumberland City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
on, to such weak men as Gideon J. Pillow and John B. Floyd, who were successively placed in chief command of Fort Donelson, at that time. But so it was. Pillow had arrived there on the 10th of the month, Feb., 1862. and with the aid of Major Gilmer, General Johnston's chief engineer, had worked diligently in strengthening the defenses. On the 13th he was superseded by Floyd, who, as we have observed, had fled from Virginia with his followers. See page 102. He had been ordered from Cumberland City by General Johnston, to hasten to Fort Donelson, and take chief command. He arrived there, with Virginia troops, on the morning of the 13th. General Simon B. Buckner was there at the head of re-enforcements from Bowling Green, and he was the only one of the three possessed of sufficient ability and military knowledge to conduct the defense with any hope of success; yet he was subordinate to the other two, until, as we shall observe presently, their fears overcame their honor, and in th
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
perate struggle, until he was only four hundred yards from the batteries. Very soon the upper one of four guns was silenced, the men were flying from both to the fort above, and the victorious vessels were on the point of shooting by, when the Louisville, assailed by flying missiles and a cross fire, was disabled by a shot which cut away her rudder-chains. Utterly helpless, she drifted away with the current of the narrow river. The flag-ship was very soon in a similar condition, and the commog flotilla some deadly parting blows. The four vessels received during the action, in the aggregate, no less than one hundred and forty-one wounds from the Confederate shot and shell, Fifty-nine shot struck the St. Louis, thirty-six hit the Louisville, twenty-six wounded the Carondelet, and twenty shot were received by the Pittsburg. and lost fifty-four men killed and maimed. After consultation with General Grant and his own officers, Foote set out for Cairo, for the purpose of having the
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t Donelson wrote as follows concerning the surrender: One of the grandest sights in the whole siege, and one which comes only once in a century, was the triumphal entry into the Fort on Sunday morning. . . . The sight from the highest point in the fort, commanding a view of both river and camp, was imposing. There were on one side regiment after regiment pouring in, their flags floating gayly in the wind; some of them which had been rent and faded on the fields of Mexico, and others with Springfield emblazoned on their folds; one magnificent brass band pouring out the melodies of Hail Columbia, Star Spangled Banner, Yankee Doodle, etc., in such style as the gazing captives had never heard, even in the palmy days of peace. On the other was a spectacle which surpasses all description. The narrow Cumberland seemed alive with steamers. First came the gun-boats, firing salutes; then came little black tugs, snorting their acclamations; and after them the vast fleet of transports, pouri
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