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Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
strategy of modern warfare to accomplish their object. Finally, on the day when Hooker and Lee had their severe battle at Chaneellorsville, May 3, 1863. Longstreet, foiled and disheartened, turned his back on Peck and retreated, pursued as far as the Blackwater by National troops under Generals Corcoran and Dodge, and Colonel Foster. Thus ended the remarkable siege of Suffolk, which had for its object the recovery of the whole country south of the James River, extending, to Albemarle Sound, in North Carolina; the ports of Norfolk and Portsmouth; eighty miles of new railroad iron; the equipment of two roads, and the capture of all the United States forces and property, with some thousands of contrabands. General J. J. Peck's Report, May 5, 1863. The importance of the services of the Army of Suffolk, as its commanding officer styled it, seems not to have had due consideration hitherto. As an act of war, the holding of that position by the garrison against more than double its
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ountains, capturing his artillery, consisting of four pieces, with munitions complete. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War. A few days after Moseby's bold exploit, the first purely cavalry battle of the war occurred, not far from Kelly's Ford, on the Rappahannock, between National troops, under General W. W. Averill, and Confederates under General Fitzhugh Lee. Averill was sent out to cut off Stuart and Lee, who, it was reported, were with a, strong party enforcing the draft in Fauquier County. On the 28th of February, General Stuart asked Governor Letcher's leave to collect together the militia of portions of Fairfax and Loudon (preparatory to the draft), which lay beyond the outposts. --Autograph. Letter of General Stuart. Permission was given. In the face of brisk opposition from a small cavalry picket, Averill crossed the Rappahannock and was pushing on toward Culpep per Court-House March 17, 1863. when, about a mile from the ford, he, encountered the forces of Lee.
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
neman to proceed cautiously with his cavalry up the eastern side of the Rappahannock; cross above the Orange and Alexandria railway; strike and disperse Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry at Culpepper Court-House, estimated at two thousand men; push on to Gordonsville, and, turning to the left, strike the Fredericksburg and Richmond railway at Saxton's Junction, and destroy it, its bridges, stations, and rolling stock, with the telegraph wires along its line, so as to sever Lee's communication with Richmonds raiding on the communications of the Army of Northern Virginia with Richmond. Stoneman crossed the Rappahannock May 29, 1863. with the main body at Kelly's Ford, and Averill (who had been ordered to push on through Culpepper Court-House to Gordonsville, and keep the Confederates in that direction employed, while detachments from the main column were destroying the railways running north from Richmond) passed the river with one division at the crossing of the Orange and Alexandria railroad.
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
sting campaign. The Army of the Potomac, lying at Falmouth, nearly opposite Fredericksburg, when Hooker took s, leaving the remainder, under General Gibbon, at Falmouth, in full view of the Confederates, so as to conceaLouisa Court-House. From his Headquarters, near Falmouth, Hooker issued an exultant order, April 30, 1863. that old inn, around Hooker's Headquarters near Falmouth. which he had bivouacked Fitzhugh Lee's brigade td he would, but prepared to fight. He Ford near Falmouth. this is a view of the Rappahannock just above Falmouth, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in June, 1866, looking from the south side of the streamlway, to the Rappahannock near the ford just above Falmouth, he determined to strike Hooker immediate and vigoth about six thousand troops, who had been left at Falmouth, and had crossed on pontoons just below the rapidsmand. Gibbon also withdrew from Fredericksburg to Falmouth that night, passing the river on pontoon bridges,
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
in the organization of the army, and in the various staff departments; and the cavalry, hitherto scattered among the Grand Divisions, See page 485, volume II. and without organization as a corps, were consolidated, and soon Picket Hut. placed in a state of greater efficiency than had ever before been known in the service. To improve them, they were sent out upon raids within the Confederate lines whenever the state of the roads would permit, and for several weeks the region between Bull's Run and the Rapid Anna was the theater of many daring exploits by the cavalry of both armies. Finally, at the middle of April, Hooker's ranks were well filled by the return of absentees, and at the close of that month, when he felt prepared for a campaign, his army was in fine spirits, thoroughly disciplined, and numbered one hundred and ten thousand The Lacy House — Hooker's Headquarters. this is a view of the Lacy House, opposite Fredericksburg, from which Sumner observed the operation
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Captain Johnspn; Battery Montgomery, Colonel England; Battery Stevens, Colonel Pease; Fort Dix, Colonel McEvilly. and the Confederates, with overwhelming numbers, tried in vain every skill and strategy of modern warfare to accomplish their object. Finally, on the day when Hooker and Lee had their severe battle at Chaneellorsville, May 3, 1863. Longstreet, foiled and disheartened, turned his back on Peck and retreated, pursued as far as the Blackwater by National troops under Generals
Hazel Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d been left behind, because artillery and cavalry could be of little service in the woods, and they were in a field at Hazel Grove. The circumstance proved to be a fortunate one, and probably saved Sickles and his two brigades from destruction or cand in preparations for renewing the struggle in the morning. Sickles, as we have observed, had reached Pleasanton at Hazel Grove, and at once attempted to recover a part of the ground lost by Howard. Birney's division, with Hobart Ward's brigade the intrenched line in advance of Fairview, which extended across the plank road, and included the elevated plateau at Hazel Grove. On the left of the line was a part of the Second Corps, and still further to the right, behind breastworks on the Elevere struggle ensued. The right of the Confederates pressed back the Nationals and seized the commanding position at Hazel Grove, with four pieces of cannon, which were speedily brought to bear upon the Unionists with fearful effect. At the same
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Clellan and Buell in the summer and early autumn of 1862, had charged all failures to suppress the rebellion to the inefficiency of the Government, whose hands they had continually striven to weaken. They had succeeded in spreading general alarm and distrust among the people; and, during the despondency that prevailed after the failure of the campaign of the Army of the Potomac, ending in inaction after the Battle of Antietam, See chapter XVIII, volume II. and of the Army of the Ohio in Kentucky, when Bragg and his, forces were allowed to escape to a stronghold near Nashville, See page 511, volume II. elections were held in ten Free-labor States, and, in the absence of the votes of the soldiers (two-thirds of whom were friends of the administration), resulted in favor of the Opposition. In these ten States Mr. Lincoln's majority in 1860 was 208,066. In 1862, the Opposition not only overcame this, but secured a majority of 35,781. The expectation of conscription to carry on
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
a large number of Moseby's men were volunteers from the regular Confederate cavalry, whose love of adventure and, lust for plunder made them so much attached to their leader, that a threat to send one of them back to his regiment was sufficient to insure the good behavior of the recusant. The estimation in which Moseby was held; by the Government is shown by the expressions of the Assistant Secretary of War, in the following account. of an exploit in October, 1864:-- War Department, Washington, October 17, 9:40 P. M. Colonel Gansevort, commanding the Thirteenth New York Cavalry, has succeeded in surprising the rebel. camp of the guerrilla and freebooter, Moseby, in the Blue Ridge Mountains, capturing his artillery, consisting of four pieces, with munitions complete. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War. A few days after Moseby's bold exploit, the first purely cavalry battle of the war occurred, not far from Kelly's Ford, on the Rappahannock, between National troops, u
Salem Heights (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
brigades after his victory, and leaving Gibbon at Fredericksburg, marched along the plank road toward Chancellorsville. Lee, at the same time, ventured again to divide his army while in front of his foe, and sent General McLaws with four brigades to meet Sedgwick. Wilcox had already hastened from Banks's Ford, and throwing his little force across the plank road, essayed to delay the progress of the Nationals. He fell back while skirmishing, and finally made a stand at Salem Church, on Salem Heights, toward which both Sedgwick and McLaws had been hastening, and where the latter had already arrived, and was forming a line of battle perpendicular to the road, and getting artillery in position. The church A brick building on the south side of the plank! road, about four miles from Fredericksburg. was filled with Wilcox's troops, and made a sort of a citadel, and so also was a school-house near by. Salem Church. Sedgwick advanced briskly, and before McLaws could complete his
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