hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,345 total hits in 247 results.

... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 ...
under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and another of negro troops, under General Steele, at Barrancas. The West Gulf Squadron, commanded by Rear-Admiral Thatcher, was there, to co-operate. Mobile was
V. Sheliha (search for this): chapter 19
cksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See page 174, volume I., and page 38, volume II. constructed a second line of works, which passed through the suburbs of the city, comprising sixteen inclosed and strong redoubts. It was then estimated that a garrison of ten thousand effective men might, with these fortifications, defend Mobile against a besieging army of forty thousand men. In 1864, a third line of earth-works was constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel V. Sheliha, about half-way between the other two, and included nineteen heavy bastioned forts and eight redoubts, making, in all the fortifications around the city, fifty-eight forts and redoubts, with connecting breast works. The parapets of the forts were from fifteen to twenty feet in thickness, and the ditches, through which the tide-water of the harbor flowed, were about twenty feet in depth and thirty in width. Besides these land defenses of Mobile, there were several well-armed batteries alo
n of the more remote defenses, on the east side of the bay, are indicated on a subsequent page. besides several which guarded the entrances to the rivers that flow into the head of Mobile Bay. Along the shore, below the city, were Batteries Missouri, Mound and Buchanan. Just below the latter, and terminating the middle line of fortifications, was Fort Sidney Johnston. In the harbor were two floating batteries and four stationary ones, named, respectively, Tighlman, Gladden, Canal, and McIntosh. The channels were obstructed by piles in many rows. General J. E. Johnston said Mobile was the best fortified place in the Confederacy. It was garrisoned by about fifteen thousand men, including the troops on the east side of the bay, and a thousand negro laborers, subject to the command of the engineers. These were under the direct command of General D. H. Maury. General Dick Taylor was then in charge of the Department Redoubt and ditch at Mobile. this was the appearance of a
Montgomery (search for this): chapter 19
521. the author's journey from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capitag the belief that Canby's real objective was Montgomery, and not Mobile. He encountered very littlerom General Forrest, then between Mobile and Montgomery, but Wilson was keeping him too thoroughly on's brigade, on detached service, moved upon Montgomery, where General Wirt Adams was in command. Ats, which had fled up that stream for safety Montgomery was formally surrendered to Wilson, by the cair, we departed on a journey by railway, to Montgomery, on the Alabama River. We passed through thll non-combatants. Between West Point and Montgomery we saw several fortifications, covering the me I. on the second bluff from the river, Montgomery stood upon a bluff on the river, which risesd look over nearly the whole. of the town. Montgomery must have been a very beautiful city, and deof the third day, when we had traveled, from Montgomery, nearly four hundred miles. In that fine Cit
J. T. Croxton (search for this): chapter 19
edition to West Point capture of Fort Tyler, 520. Croxton's destructive raid, 521. the author's journey fromng at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning artillery of the Confederate cavalry; and that General Croxton, on his way from Elyton, had struck Jackson's rtercepted dispatch, that Jackson was about to fight Croxton, and from a subsequent dispatch from the latter to there, and push on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's column. McCook found Jackll posted, with intrenchments covering his column. Croxton had not come up, and he could hear nothing of him. d him on the 5th, and now the whole army, excepting Croxton's brigade, on detached service, moved upon Montgomehe main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some unst, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of A
tance, to the left, as we turned into Grant's Pass, See page 440. and took the inner passage. The waters of the Gulf were smooth; and at dawn the next morning, we were moored at the railway wharf on the western sidle of Lake Pontchartrain. We were at the St. Charles Hotel, in New Orleans, in time for an early break-fast; and in that city, during his stay, the writer experienced the kindest courtesy and valuable assistance in the prosecution of his researches, from Generals Sheridan and Hartsuff. Two works of art, then in New Orleans, were objects of special interest, when considering the inscriptions upon each, in their relation to the rebellion. One was the equestrian statue of Andrew Jackson, in Jackson Square, the principal place of public resort on fine days and evenings, where the citizens may enjoy the fresh air and perfumes of flowers. On the pedestal of that statue, in letters of almost imperishable granite, might have been read, while the friends of the Conspirators
e harbor the position of the more remote defenses, on the east side of the bay, are indicated on a subsequent page. besides several which guarded the entrances to the rivers that flow into the head of Mobile Bay. Along the shore, below the city, were Batteries Missouri, Mound and Buchanan. Just below the latter, and terminating the middle line of fortifications, was Fort Sidney Johnston. In the harbor were two floating batteries and four stationary ones, named, respectively, Tighlman, Gladden, Canal, and McIntosh. The channels were obstructed by piles in many rows. General J. E. Johnston said Mobile was the best fortified place in the Confederacy. It was garrisoned by about fifteen thousand men, including the troops on the east side of the bay, and a thousand negro laborers, subject to the command of the engineers. These were under the direct command of General D. H. Maury. General Dick Taylor was then in charge of the Department Redoubt and ditch at Mobile. this was
h, with about thirteen thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, went with the Sixteenth Army Corps to New Oto Jackson, in Walker County. Long went by devious ways to the same point, and McCook, taking the Tuscaloosa road as far as Eldridge, turned eastward to Jasper, fromntevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning the public phould endeavor to fight Jackson and prevent his joining Forrest, Wilson ordered McCook to move rapidly, with La Grange's brigade, to Centreville, cross the Cahawba thsh on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's column. McCook found Jackson at Scottsville, well posted, with intrenchments covering his coluson's army did not make the passage of the stream until the 10th. April, 1865. McCook had rejoined him on the 5th, and now the whole army, excepting Croxton's brigad
St. John Lidell (search for this): chapter 19
f the militia brigade of General Thomas, known as the Alabama reserves, and a brigade of veterans from Missouri and Mississippi, of Hood's army, under General Cockerell. The two brigades numbered about three thousand men, commanded K by General St. John Lidell. Ever since Steele's arrival from Pensacola, his troops, and particularly Hawkins's negro division, had held Fort Blakely, as the works there were called, in a state of siege; and, for the first four days of the siege of Spanish Fort,en, they did not murder their captives. So ended, in triumph to the Nationals, the battle of Blakely. By seven o'clock; or within the space of an hour and a half from the time the assault began, they had possession of all the works, with Generals Lidell, Cockerell, and Thomas, and other officers of high rank, and three thousand men, as prisoners of war. The spoils were nearly forty pieces of artillery, four thousand small-arms, sixteen battle-flags, and a vast quantity of ammunition. The C
J. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 19
co-operating movement was intrusted to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the he 7th he met a negro with dispatches from General Wilson to General Canby, carefully sewed up in thTuscaloosa. Hearing of this, March 27, 1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample sups best, and did so. After a reconnoissance, Wilson directed Long to attack the Confederate works ousand bales of cotton in that city, he fled. Wilson entered it, unopposed, on the morning of the 1 safety Montgomery was formally surrendered to Wilson, by the city authorities with five guns, and a's marched the next day. Minty, accompanied by Wilson, arrived at Macon on the 20th, when the Confedrces there surrendered without resistance; and Wilson was informed by Howell Cobb, of the surrender n, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. Aname has been mentioned, as the entertainer of Wilson and Forrest. See page 518. Our voyage to Mo[25 more...]
... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 ...