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Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ion of seven regiments, and several light batteries, were organized as the Thirteenth Army Corps, comprising three divisions, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixteenth Army Corps (General A. J. Smith), which had assisted in driving Hood out of Tennessee, was ordered to join Canby. It was then cantoned at Eastport. Early in February, it went in transports, accompanied by Knipe's division of cavalry, five thousand strong, by the waters of the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers, to New Orleans, where it arrived on the 21st, February. after a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby
Wetumpka (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
e river, Wilson's army did not make the passage of the stream until the 10th. April, 1865. McCook had rejoined him on the 5th, and now the whole army, excepting Croxton's brigade, on detached service, moved upon Montgomery, where General Wirt Adams was in command. Adams did not wait for Wilson's arrival; but, setting fire to ninety thousand bales of cotton in that city, he fled. Wilson entered it, unopposed, on the morning of the 12th, when Major Weston, marching rapidly northward toward Wetumpka, on the Coosa, captured and destroyed five heavily laden Union Prison at Cahawba. sketched from a steamboat, in April, 1866. steamboats, which had fled up that stream for safety Montgomery was formally surrendered to Wilson, by the city authorities with five guns, and a large quantity of small-arms, which were destroyed. So it was that the original Capital of the Confederacy of Rebels was repossessed by the Government without hinderance and the flag of the Republic was unfurled in tr
Talladega (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
il 5. the place he had been sent against from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destroyed the military school and other public property there, and leaving Tuscaloosa, burned the bridges over the Black Warrior, and pushed on southwesterly, to Eutaw, in Greene County. There he was told that Wirt Adams was after him, with two thousand cavalry. He was not strong enough to fight them, so he turned back nearly to Tuscaloosa, and pushing northeastward, captured Talladega. Near there he encountered and dispersed a small Confederate force. He kept on his course to Carrollton, in Georgia, destroying iron-works and factories in the region over which he raided, and then turned southeastward, and made his way to Macon. With his little force he had marched, skirmished, and destroyed, over a line six hundred and fifty miles in extent, in the space of thirty days, not once hearing of Wilson and the main body during that time. He found no powerful opposition in
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
estruction of property in Selma, 518. capture of Montgomery and Columbus, 519. La Grange's expedition to Wesurney from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capital, 523. at Selma, Mobile, and Nrepared to move eastward into, Georgia, by way of Montgomery. He. directed Major Hubbard to construct a pontothe Confederacy by the Provisional Government, at Montgomery. See page 256, volume I. Wilson paused two days at Montgomery, and then pushed on eastward toward the Chattahoochee River, the boundary between Alabama the Chattahoochee River by the railway connecting Montgomery and Atlanta while the main column passed on towareight o'clock in the evening before we arrived at Montgomery, and found lodgings at the Exchange Hotel, from wt of the day in visiting places of interest about Montgomery, and toward evening, we embarked in the steamer Jrican history, for its. banks and its bosom, from Montgomery to Mobile, are clustered with the most stirring a
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
prising three divisions, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixteenth Army Corps (General A. J. Smith), which had assisted in driving Hood out of Tennessee, was ordered to join Canby. It was then cantoned at Eastport. Early in February, it went in transports, accompanied by Knipe's division of cavalry, five thousand strong, by the waters of the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers, to New Orleans, where it arrived on the 21st, February. after a travel oon the Tennessee River, on the 22d of March, with about thirteen thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, went with the Sixteenth Army Corps to New Orleans. Hatch's division was left at Eastport. He had six batteries. His men were all mounted excepting fifteen hundred, who were detailed as an escort to the supply and baggage trains of two hundred and fifty wagons. There was also a light pontoon train of thirty boats, carried by fifty
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
pedition to West Point capture of Fort Tyler, 520. Croxton's destructive raid, 521. the author's journey from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capital, 523. at Selma, Mobile, and New Orleans, 524. departure for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, 525. The repossession of Alabama was an important part of General Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary troy the. Union and establish an empire founded upon slavery, these mute but terrible accusers, rebuked the criminals unmolested. Having accomplished the object of his errand in that great metropolis of the Gulf region, he reluctantly bade adieu to his traveling companions for ten days (Mr. and Mrs. Hart), and embarked on the Mississippi River for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, in the steamer Indiana. That voyage has already been considered. See page 688, volume II. Tail-piece — artesian wel
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
command, to Admiral Thatcher, at Sidney, on the terms which Grant had given to Lee a month before. Let us now consider the operations of General Wilson, in the field, while Canby was effecting the reduction of Mobile. After the close of Thomas's active campaign in Middle Tennessee, the cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi, numbering about twenty-two thousand men and horses, were encamped on the north side of the Tennessee River, at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been thoroughly disciplined, when, in March, 1865. they were prepared for an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensive iron founderies. The march of Cheatham toward the Carolinas, with a part of Hood's broken army, and the employment of the remainder at Mobile, made nearly the whole of Thoma
Decatur, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
e region of Crawfordsville, the home of Stephens, the Vice-President of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand of Sherman, when he began his march to the sea, in the ruins of railway stations, twisted iron rails, and charred ties, along the road-side. Toward evening the grand dome of Stone Mountain, a heap of granite fifteen hundred feet in height, loomed up a mile or so north of us. From Decatur onward, the earth-works of both parties were seen in thickening lines, and at twilight we were in the midst of the ruined city of Atlanta, then showing some hopeful signs of resurrection from its ashes. We passed a rainy day in Atlanta, the writer leaving the examination of the intrenchments and the battle-fields around it until a second visit, See page 404. which he intended to make a few weeks later, and on the morning of the 8th, April, 1866. in chilling, cheerless air, we departe
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
cy by the Provisional Government, at Montgomery. See page 256, volume I. Wilson paused two days at Montgomery, and then pushed on eastward toward the Chattahoochee River, the boundary between Alabama and Georgia,--Columbus, in the latter State, ninety miles distant, being his chief objective. At Tuskegee, Colonel La Grange was detached and sent to West Point at the crossing of the Chattahoochee River by the railway connecting Montgomery and Atlanta while the main column passed on toward Columbus. That city was on the east side of the Chattahoochee, and when Wilson came in sight of it, in front of the Confederate works, on the evening of the 16th, hefive men, including officers. It was surrounded by a dry ditch, twelve feet wide and ten deep, and commanded the approaches to the bridge which crossed the Chattahoochee River, and the little village of West Point. This work La Grange assaulted on three sides, with his men dismounted, at a little past one Fort Tyler. this is
Dauphin Island (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantr
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