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South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. Rear-Admiral Dahlgren succeeds Rear-Admiral Dupont. Dahlgren's difficult task. General Gillmore requests naval co-operation. Charleston harbor. plan of General Gillmore. attack on enemy's works by Army and Navy. capture of Confederate works on South end of Morris Island. assault on Fort Wagner. Gillmore repulsed. Second attack on Fort Sumter. capture of enemy's defences. the Catskill severely handled. another combined attack on Fort Wagner. the Fort silenced. Army badly repulsed in an assault. active operations suspended. bravery of troops under General strong and Colonel Putnam. dreadful hand-to-hand conflict. earth-works erected by Gillmore. the Swamp Angel. gun-boats engage batteries in Stono River. the Commodore McDonough silences Confederate artillery near Secessionville. Lieutenant Robeson plants the flag on Morris Isla
Manhattan (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
o other consequence. Thus, early in the operations, Dahlgren prepared the Navy Department not to expect as much from the Monitors as was required of DuPont; as, with others, he had made up his mind that operations against the whole circle of forts should not be undertaken with a force that had proved itself totally inadequate on a former occasion. Charleston harbor, in its general configuration, may be likened to that of New York, the city being on a neck of land somewhat resembling Manhattan Island; Cooper River, on the east, may be compared to the East River; while the Ashley River, on the west, resembles the Hudson. Morris and Sullivan Islands may pass for the defensive points at the Narrows, though the channel between them is much wider; and the interior fortifications — Sumter, Moultrie, Cumming's Point, Battery Gregg, Fort Johnson, etc.--were all within the lines of Morris and Sullivan Islands. An attack on Fort Wagner could be made by a naval force without bringing the shi
Land's End, South-carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
gh at low water, did not succeed in floating on the next high tide. Later in the day, the rear-admiral moved up in the Ironsides, with the Monitors, to feel and, if possible, pass the obstructions north of Sumter. Moultrie, Battery Bee and Fort Beauregard quickly opened on the ironclads, which returned the fire very warmly, and continued to do so until it became necessary to pay attention to the Weehawken. Steam-tugs and hawsers were provided for getting her off, but without success, even atunts have been given out stating the number of guns to be as high as three hundred and thirty. The Confederate accounts, which there seems no reason to doubt, gave the armament of the works as follows: Sumter 44, Moultrie 21, Battery Bee 6, Fort Beauregard 2, Cumming's Point 2, and Wagner 19; total 94. To these must be added the batteries at Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, Mount Pleasant, Fort Johnson, Battery Gregg, and the Creek batteries. Altogether, the naval commanders, and all with the
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ops under General strong and Colonel Putnam. dreadful hand-to-hand conflict. earth-works erected by Gillmore. the Swamp Angel. gun-boats engage batteries in Stono River. the Commodore McDonough silences Confederate artillery near Secessionville. Lieutenant Robeson plants the flag on Morris Island. Landing of troops at folly han any three Monitors in the fleet. While General Gillmore was perfecting his plans, the vessels of the fleet were not idle. A smart affair came off in the Stono River, in which the Pawnee (Commander Balch), Marblehead (Lieutenant-Commander Scott), and the Huron were engaged. The Pawnee and Marblehead were at anchor near Fortin this affair, and it is remarkable that a number were not killed, considering the precision of the enemy's fire. Commander Balch, the senior officer on the Stono River, speaks in the handsomest terms of the conduct of Lieutenant-Commander Bacon for his unremitting attention to duties in that locality, where, for a period of fi
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
rt Johnson, etc.--were all within the lines of Morris and Sullivan Islands. An attack on Fort Wagneal Gillmore was to dispossess the enemy of Morris Island by opening batteries placed on the north eaking an attack on the Morris Island works (Fort Wagner), would be two and one-quarter miles from Fte fortified positions on the south end of Morris Island, and after an engagement of three hours anron-clads at this time were laid abreast of Fort Wagner. This was an open sand-work about two and nt nature; still, a foothold was gained on Morris Island, and the officers in command felt satisfie at 11:30 A. M. of the above date led up to Fort Wagner with his flag flying on the Montauk, followGillmore did toward securing possession of Morris Island, which he determined to hold, was to constvre — a part of the programme of attack on Morris Island — was successfully accomplished under cove General — I have the honor to report that Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg are ours. Last night our[51 more...
Creek (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Notwithstanding the actual strength of Charleston,exaggerated accounts have been given out stating the number of guns to be as high as three hundred and thirty. The Confederate accounts, which there seems no reason to doubt, gave the armament of the works as follows: Sumter 44, Moultrie 21, Battery Bee 6, Fort Beauregard 2, Cumming's Point 2, and Wagner 19; total 94. To these must be added the batteries at Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, Mount Pleasant, Fort Johnson, Battery Gregg, and the Creek batteries. Altogether, the naval commanders, and all with them, deserve high commendation for accomplishing what they did before Charleston; their efforts, though not successful in capture, rendered the place of not the slightest use to the Confederacy even as a resort for blockade-runners, whence supplies from abroad could be received. On the contrary, its possession was a drawback to them, for its defence necessitated the retention there of a large number of troops, elsewhere sadly nee
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
er; and the interior fortifications — Sumter, Moultrie, Cumming's Point, Battery Gregg, Fort Johnsons, including Moultrie and Wagner; while above Moultrie, and forming a triangle with it and Battery Gld be open only to the fire of Battery Gregg, Moultrie and Wagner at long range, with the Monitors pchannels, and they drew off under the fire of Moultrie, which being as yet intact was more than a mal firing steadily and accurately. Meanwhile, Moultrie opened a rapid and well-sustained fire from ier condition, and began to fire upon her from Moultrie, about 3,000 yards distant. The iron-clads we and simultaneously, at a signal from Sumter, Moultrie, together with the gunboats and rams, opened apidity of her fire. until its spirit forced Moultrie to slacken. Two guns from each of the 10-inch batteries between Moultrie and Beauregard, however, still caused the Ironsides to suffer, and only armament of the works as follows: Sumter 44, Moultrie 21, Battery Bee 6, Fort Beauregard 2, Cumming[4 more...]
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. Rear-Admiral Dahlgren succeeds Rear-Adtask. General Gillmore requests naval co-operation. Charleston harbor. plan of General Gillmore. attack on enemy's works in every quarter. DuPont had said that the forts in Charleston harbor could not be taken by the force with which he had attthe attack made by DuPont upon the uninjured forts in Charleston harbor, with the same Monitors that had failed so badly, anded itself totally inadequate on a former occasion. Charleston harbor, in its general configuration, may be likened to thatat a second attack was preparing against the forts in Charleston harbor, and that its success required the military occupatioFederals while Moultrie--one of the heaviest works in Charleston harbor — and others stood ready to drive out of Sumter any Fsserted that it was no longer of any practical use to Charleston harbor as an offensive work. This was pretty well demonstra
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
y of troops under General strong and Colonel Putnam. dreadful hand-to-hand conflict. earth-works erected by Gillmore. the Swamp Angel. gun-boats engage batteries in Stono River. the Commodore McDonough silences Confederate artillery near Secessionville. Lieutenant Robeson plants the flag on Morris Island. Landing of troops at folly and James Islands. attack on forts Sumter and Wagner. results of bombardment. Gillmore demands surrender of Sumter. letter of Beauregard. Gillmore's replyder Bacon for his unremitting attention to duties in that locality, where, for a period of five months, he had been co-operating with the Army. On the 16th of July the Confederates commenced an artillery fire on General Gillmore's pickets at Secessionville, but were speedily silenced by Lieutenant-Commander Bacon moving up the river with the Commodore McDonough, and firing into their camp with his rifled gun. In a report by Lieutenant A. S. McKenzie, referring to the landing of the brigade,
Japan (Japan) (search for this): chapter 37
reeable to the American people, yet that Government would have entered upon the fulfillment of their threats with misgivings — the growth of former disappointments in the War of 1812. Aside from his recently acquired renown, there was no officer in the United States Navy better known abroad than Rear-Admiral DuPont. Many years of his life had been passed in the Mediterranean Squadron, where he traveled and made many European friends. He had commanded one of our best squadrons in China and Japan, and his bland manners, high standing as an officer, general knowledge on all subjects, in and out of his profession, made him an authority to whom foreign officers deferred. He was as well posted in all naval matters as any officer at home or abroad, and his opinions, which did not in 1863 run in accord with those of the Navy Department, were adopted by his friends and acquaintances in every quarter. DuPont had said that the forts in Charleston harbor could not be taken by the force with
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