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G. E. Hill (search for this): chapter 51
ley; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, John F. Reilly; Acting-Second-Assistant, T. Galloway; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. Cornell, F. M. Dykes and T. H. Cross; Acting-Carpenter, J. C. Tier. Steamer Yankee. Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, Edward Hooker; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, S. T. Brown; Acting-Ensign, G. D. Gilderdale; Acting-Master's Mates, H. C. Borden and Robert Robinson; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, W. H. Hughes and John F. Costar. Steamer Commodore Read. Acting-Master, G. E. Hill; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, James Wilson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Duffield; Acting-Ensigns, G. E. McConnell, C. Ainsworth and L. Wold; Acting-Master's Mates, Guy Morrison, E. K. Howland and G. A. Patchke; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. K. Gaul; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Westinghouse, Wesley J. Phillips and George Smith. Steamer Currituck. Acting-Master, W. H. Smith; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Henry Johnson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Frank Clark; Acting-En
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 51
olation of neutrality by the British Government in permitting the Confederate cruisers to escape its vigilance, was Mr. Gideon Welles, the Secretary of the Navy. He had appealed to Congress time after time to appropriate money to enable the Navy Dethe depredations of the Confederate commerce-destroyers, but Congress dealt out money in such insufficient amounts that Mr. Welles could not at once equip the class of vessels desired, not only to put a stop to the destruction of Federal commerce, bur, in case the Federal Government was driven to resort to the last extremity to preserve its prestige and its honor. Mr. Welles. in his annual reports, was unceasing in his denunciations of the remissness of the British Government and the depredatunfortunately, there were obstacles in the way which for a time impeded the progress of his plans. In the first place, Mr. Welles attached too much importance to the blockade of the Southern ports and listened too much to the clamors of commanders o
Frank Clark (search for this): chapter 51
ommodore Read. Acting-Master, G. E. Hill; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, James Wilson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Duffield; Acting-Ensigns, G. E. McConnell, C. Ainsworth and L. Wold; Acting-Master's Mates, Guy Morrison, E. K. Howland and G. A. Patchke; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. K. Gaul; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Westinghouse, Wesley J. Phillips and George Smith. Steamer Currituck. Acting-Master, W. H. Smith; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Henry Johnson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Frank Clark; Acting-Ensigns, Thomas Nelson, Ambrose Felix and J. A. Havens; Acting-Master's Mate, G. B. Hall; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Alfred Clum; Acting-Third-Assistants, O. P. Thompson and C. B. Wright. Steamer Jacob Bell. Acting-Master, G. C. Shultze; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Neilson, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel Anderson; Acting-Ensigns, Benjamin Walker and D. W. Hodson; Acting-Master's Mates, Robert L. Omensetter and Arthur Clegg; Engineers: Acting
January 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 51
e Government, in the several Navy Yards. If we add to the number those constructed under similar circumstances, and within the same period, that had been lost by shipwreck, in battle, etc., viz.: the sloops Housatonic and Adirondack, and the iron-clads Monitor, Weehawken, Keokuk, Indianola and Tecumseh, the aggregate would be 210 vessels, 1,675 guns and 256,755 tons. Picket-boats, and small craft built for especial purposes, are not embraced in this statement. Potomac flotilla, January 1, 1864. Commander Foxhall A. Parker. Steamer Ella. Acting-Master, J. H. Eldredge; Paymaster, J. N. Carpenter; Acting-Ensign, E. A. Roderick; Acting-Master's Mates, W. H. Flood, H. C. Eldredge and W. L. Gilley; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, John F. Reilly; Acting-Second-Assistant, T. Galloway; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. Cornell, F. M. Dykes and T. H. Cross; Acting-Carpenter, J. C. Tier. Steamer Yankee. Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, Edward Hooker; Acting-Assistant Paymast
the Confederacy, large strides were made in building up the Navy; which it will be seen in the end was the wisest policy to pursue, as it taught those Powers that were forgetting their neutral obligations that the policy they had hitherto pursued would no more be tolerated, and showed them that the longer the war lasted the stronger the Federal Government would grow, no matter what might be the drafts upon its treasury. For attacks on forts and for river work the Federal Government had by 1863 a sufficient number of vessels to close the Confederate ports; and it was determined to build a number of large vessels that would be superior to any ships of their class abroad, not only in the power of their guns but in their speed. At that moment the exigencies of the times had stimulated the inventive faculties of American ship and engine builders to make vast improvements in vessels-of-war — in machinery, in naval ordnance and in projectiles. At the commencement of the war, the Feder
March 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 51
e latter leaned upon him as his ablest adviser. Report of the Secretary of the Navy. A tabular statement is appended of the number of naval vessels, of every class, that had been constructed, or were in the course of construction, since March 4, 1861: General exhibit of the Navy, including vessels under construction, Dec., 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 113 Screw steamers especially constructed for naval purposes 1,426 169,231 52 Paddle-wheel stase for the year 167 42,429 26 Total losses by shipwreck, in battle, capture, &c., during the year 146 13,084 109 Actual addition to the navy from December, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw sloops, Ammonoosuc class, 17 to 19 guns, 3,213 to 3,713 tons each 121 23,637 1 Screw sloop Idaho, 8 guns, 2,638 tons 8 2,638 8 Screw sloops, spar deck, Java class, 25 guns and 3,177 tons each
ter 48: Potomac flotilla. Increase of the Navy, and improvements in naval ships, during the year 1864. The Potomac Flotilla during 1864 remained under the command of Commander Foxhall A. Parker, a1864 remained under the command of Commander Foxhall A. Parker, a valuable officer, who conducted the affairs of his little squadron with so much efficiency that he was enabled to carry out all the objects for which the flotilla was intended. The work of this dederates had done against the commerce of any other government. There was in the latter part of 1864 a growing feeling in the Federal States against the action of Great Britain, which, though the lamatters, and had to make great exertions to catch up with the powers of Europe; but by the end of 1864 they were quite in a condition to vindicate their rights and rebuke Great Britain and France for 850 69,549 671 Total 4,610 510,396 Comparative statement of the Navy, December, 1863 and 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 671 Total navy, December, 1864 4,
December, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 51
&c., fitted for naval purposes 921 78,762 112 Sailing vessels of all classes 850 69,549 671 Total 4,610 510,396 Comparative statement of the Navy, December, 1863 and 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 671 Total navy, December, 1864 4,610 510,396 588 Total navy, December, 1863 4,443 December, 1863 4,443 467,967 83 Actual increase for the year 167 42,429 26 Total losses by shipwreck, in battle, capture, &c., during the year 146 13,084 109 Actual addition to the navy from December, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw slooDecember, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw sloops, Ammonoosuc class, 17 to 19 guns, 3,213 to 3,713 tons each 121 23,637 1 Screw sloop Idaho, 8 guns, 2,638 tons 8 2,638 8 Screw sloops, spar deck, Java class, 25 guns and 3,177 tons each 200 25,416 2 Screw sloops, spar deck, Hassalo class, 25 guns and 3,365 tons each 50 6,730 10 Screw sloops, clippers, single deck, Co
December, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 51
osure, who, but for the war, might be living to-day. Increase of the Navy and improvements in naval ships up to December, 1864. As the war progressed, it became evident that the Federal Government should not only build vessels for blockading the course of construction, since March 4, 1861: General exhibit of the Navy, including vessels under construction, Dec., 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 113 Screw steamers especially constructed for naval pur of the Navy, December, 1863 and 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 671 Total navy, December, 1864 4,610 510,396 588 Total navy, December, 1863 4,443 467,967 83 Actual increase for the year 167 42,429 26 Totwreck, in battle, capture, &c., during the year 146 13,084 109 Actual addition to the navy from December, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw sl
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