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Marseilles (France) (search for this): chapter 3
arrived at Toulon, and, with the authority previously obtained from the French Government, examined the military and naval defences of that important depot. But the only facility extended to them was that afforded by a printed ticket of admission transmitted from Paris, which did no more than command the services of a porter to conduct them through the buildings, docks, and vessels, and gave them no opportunity to converse with any of the officers. From Toulon they visited in succession Marseilles, Lyons, Belfort, Strasbourg, Rastadt, Coblentz, and Cologne, observing their fortresses and defences,--in the last three places, however, without the advantage of any special authority. The 24th and 25th of February were spent at Liege, where their time was occupied at the national foundry for artillery and another for smallarms, both on a more extended scale than any corresponding establishments in Europe at that time. On the 1st of March the commission was at Paris again. Two days
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
n any corresponding establishments in Europe at that time. On the 1st of March the commission was at Paris again. Two days were devoted to an examination of the fortress at Vincennes; and several of the military establishments in Paris were also inspected. They were unable, however, to obtain the requisite authority for seeing those relating to the artillery. On the 18th of March the commission proceeded to Cherbourg and examined the works there. On the 24th of March they arrived at London, and afterwards visited the arsenal and dockyards at Woolwich, the vessels at Portsmouth, and the defences near Yarmouth, on the Isle of Wight, receiving every courtesy and facility they could desire from the military and naval officers at those stations in furthering the object of their visit. On the 19th of April they embarked for home. The above is a brief record of the labors of a very busy year, in which, however, much precious time was lost from delay in obtaining the necessary off
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
Major A. Mordecai, Captain G. B. Mcclellan, United States Army. The officers composing the commission sailed from Boston on the 11th of April. On arriving in England, they were courteously received by Lord Clarendon, Secretary of State for the Foreign Department,--Lord Panmure, the Secretary of War, being disabled by illness,-rs of the present work, in an octavo volume, with illustrations, with the title, The Armies of Europe: comprising Descriptions in detail of the Military System of England, France, Russia, Prussia, Austria, and Sardinia, adapting their Advant<*>ges to all Arms of the United States Service, and embodying the Report of Observations innded by active and energetic regular officers and supported by regular troops, would undoubtedly be of great service. The cavalry of Prussia, Austria, France, England, and the United States are next considered, the whole occupying about one hundred pages; and an Appendix, of the same extent, contains a system of regulations for
Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 3
d from the French Government, examined the military and naval defences of that important depot. But the only facility extended to them was that afforded by a printed ticket of admission transmitted from Paris, which did no more than command the services of a porter to conduct them through the buildings, docks, and vessels, and gave them no opportunity to converse with any of the officers. From Toulon they visited in succession Marseilles, Lyons, Belfort, Strasbourg, Rastadt, Coblentz, and Cologne, observing their fortresses and defences,--in the last three places, however, without the advantage of any special authority. The 24th and 25th of February were spent at Liege, where their time was occupied at the national foundry for artillery and another for smallarms, both on a more extended scale than any corresponding establishments in Europe at that time. On the 1st of March the commission was at Paris again. Two days were devoted to an examination of the fortress at Vincennes;
Strasbourg (France) (search for this): chapter 3
h the authority previously obtained from the French Government, examined the military and naval defences of that important depot. But the only facility extended to them was that afforded by a printed ticket of admission transmitted from Paris, which did no more than command the services of a porter to conduct them through the buildings, docks, and vessels, and gave them no opportunity to converse with any of the officers. From Toulon they visited in succession Marseilles, Lyons, Belfort, Strasbourg, Rastadt, Coblentz, and Cologne, observing their fortresses and defences,--in the last three places, however, without the advantage of any special authority. The 24th and 25th of February were spent at Liege, where their time was occupied at the national foundry for artillery and another for smallarms, both on a more extended scale than any corresponding establishments in Europe at that time. On the 1st of March the commission was at Paris again. Two days were devoted to an examinat
Paskievitch (search for this): chapter 3
he Crimea by the way of Prussia, starting first for Berlin, in order to confer with the Russian Minister in that city, Baron de Budberg, to whom the Russian Minister at Washington had given them a letter. Their object was to go from Berlin to the Crimea by the way of Warsaw and Kiev, on the Danube; and Baron de Budberg gave them passports and letters to Baron Krusentein, a Russian official at Warsaw. But on arriving at Warsaw they learned that no person there — not even the veteran hero Paskievitch, with whom they had an interview, and who treated them with much courtesy — had the power to grant them permission to go from Warsaw direct to the Crimea, and that there was nothing to be done but to proceed to St. Petersburg. During their stay in Warsaw, they examined the fortifications of that city and of Modlin. It was very annoying to the officers of the commission to find their progress blocked by ceremonials and formalities which they might have escaped if they had been civilian
Krusentein (search for this): chapter 3
ablishments as they desired to inspect. On the 28th of May, the commission left Paris, intending to proceed to the Russian camp in the Crimea by the way of Prussia, starting first for Berlin, in order to confer with the Russian Minister in that city, Baron de Budberg, to whom the Russian Minister at Washington had given them a letter. Their object was to go from Berlin to the Crimea by the way of Warsaw and Kiev, on the Danube; and Baron de Budberg gave them passports and letters to Baron Krusentein, a Russian official at Warsaw. But on arriving at Warsaw they learned that no person there — not even the veteran hero Paskievitch, with whom they had an interview, and who treated them with much courtesy — had the power to grant them permission to go from Warsaw direct to the Crimea, and that there was nothing to be done but to proceed to St. Petersburg. During their stay in Warsaw, they examined the fortifications of that city and of Modlin. It was very annoying to the officers o
Wellington (search for this): chapter 3
zed without a touch of arrogance, and yet with a manly decision of tone which reveals a sound military judgment and thorough military training. It merits can be fully perceived only by a professional reader; bat the general reader cannot fail to recognize in it the marks which show the writer to be a man of vigorous understanding and excellent powers of observation, as well as an accomplished officer. The style is simple, perspicuous, and direct, the style of Washington, Collingwood, and Wellington;--in other words, that good style which a man of sense will always write who has something to say and writes on without thinking about his style at all. As the work. from the nature of its contents, can never have been generally read, two extracts from this portion of the volume are hero appended,--enough, it is believed, to justify the commendation which has been bestowed upon it. The first is a brief criticism of the defences of Sebastopol:-- From the preceding hasty and imperfect ac
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 3
fe as if he had remained in the army. The rapid growth and material development of the country created a demand for capacities and accomplishments like his; and immediately upon his resignation he was appointed chief engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad, then just opened, and went to Chicago to reside. In a few weeks he was made vice-president of the corporation, and took general charge of all the business of the road in Illinois. In this capacity he first made the acquaintance of Mr. Lincoln, now President of the United States, then a practising lawyer in Springfield, Illinois, and occasionally employed in the conduct of suits and other professional services on behalf of the company. In May, 1860, Captain McClellan was married to Miss Ellen Marcy, daughter of General R. B. Marcy, his former commander in Texas, and the chief of his staff during the Peninsular campaign. In August, 1860, he resigned the vice-presidency of the Illinois Central Road, in order to accept the p
full dress; a cloth vest and loose jacket, which leave the neck unencumbered by collar, stock, or cravat, cover the upper portion of his body, and allow free movement of the arms; the scarlet pants are of the loose Oriental pattern, and are tucked under gaiters like those of the foot rifles of the guard; the overcoat is a loose cloak, with a hood; the chasseurs wear a similar one. The men say that this dress is the most convenient possible, and prefer it to any other. The Zouaves are all French; they are selected from among the old campaigners for their fine physique and tried courage, and have certainly proved that they are what their appearance would indicate,--the most reckless, self-reliant, and complete infantry that Europe can produce. With his graceful dress, soldierly bearing, and vigilant attitude, the Zouave at an outpost is the beau-ideal of a soldier. They neglect no opportunity of adding to their personal comforts: if there is a stream in the vicinity, the part
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