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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. Search the whole document.

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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 6
, to conceal his death from the surrounding hostile savages, was sunk by his surviving followers in the deep current of that mighty stream. Of the entire expedition, less than half, an enfeebled and wretched remnant, finally reached the coast of Mexico, in the summer of 1543, glad to have escaped with their bare lives from the inhospitable swamps and savages they had so recklessly encountered. It does not appear that any of them, nor even De Soto himself, had formed any adequate conception of by its tributaries; since more than a century was allowed to transpire before the Mississippi was revisited by civilized men. And its next discoverers were not Spaniards, but Frenchmen ; although Spain had long possessed and colonized Florida and Mexico on either side of its mouth. But the French--now firmly established in Canada, and penetrating by their traders and voyageurs the wild region stretching westward and south-westward from that Colony — obtained from the savages some account of thi
Magdeburg (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany) (search for this): chapter 6
ate in the colony of Cayenne, with a view to emancipate the slaves on it, is a generous and noble proof of your humanity. Would to God a like spirit might diffuse itself in the minds of the people of this country! But I despair of seeing it. Some petitions were presented to the Assembly at its last session, for the Abolition of Slavery, but they could scarcely obtain a reading.--Ibid., vol. IX., p. 163. In a remarkable and very interesting letter written by Lafayette in the prison of Magdeburg, he said: I know not what disposition has been made of my plantation at Cayenne; but I hope Madam De Lafayette will take care that the negroes who cultivate it shall preserve their liberty. The following language is also Lafayette's, in a letter to Hamilton, from Paris, April 13, 1785: In one of your New York Gazettes, I find an association against the Slavery of the negroes, which seems to me worded in such a way as to give no offense to the moderate men in the Southern States
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
as implanted in every evil the seeds of its overthrow and ultimate destruction. The conflicting, currents of American thought and action with regard to Slavery — that which was cherished by the Revolutionary patriots, and gradually died with them, and that by which the former was imperceptibly supplanted — are strikingly exhibited in the history and progress of the movement for African Colonization. Its originator was the Rev. Samuel Hopkins, D. D., who was settled as a clergyman at Newport, R. I., in 1770, and found that thriving sea-port a focus of Slavery and the Slave-Trade, upon both of which he soon commenced an active and determined war. The idea of counteracting, and ultimately suppressing, the Slave-Trade, through a systematic colonization of the western coast of Africa with emancipated blacks from America, was matured and suggested by him to others, even before the outbreak of the Revolutionary war; and its realization, interrupted by that struggle, was resumed by him di
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
f Congress to Slavery Extension purchase of Louisiana El Whitney and his Cotton-Gin Colonizationes of this revolution are the acquisition of Louisiana and the invention of the Cotton Gin; Thise primarily responsible. The acquisition of Louisiana, though second in occurrence and in importanpletion, ten years afterward. The colony of Louisiana (so named after Louis XIV.) remained a Frencth revolutionary France, to retrocede to her Louisiana, almost without consideration; and the Frencter at Paris, as follows: The cession of Louisiana and the Floridas by Spain to France, works m bold stroke to avert it. He determined that Louisiana should be ours, and perceived, in the gathereeded money; we needed, or at least coveted, Louisiana: and, where the rulers on either side are meexpressly stipulated that the inhabitants of Louisiana should be incorporated into the Union of theut the unexpected results of the purchase of Louisiana and the invention of the Cotton-Gin were suc[5 more...]
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e 13th of November, 1807, reported briefly against the petition, closing as follows: Your Committee, after duly considering the matter, respectfully submit the following resolution: Resolved, That it is not expedient at this time to suspend the sixth article of compact for the government of the Territory of the United States North-West of the river Ohio. And here the long and fruitless struggle to fasten Slavery upon the vast Territory now forming the States of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, appears to have ended. By this time, emigration from the Free States into that Territory had begun. But it is probable that, at any time prior to 1818-20, a majority of the white settlers actually resident in that Territory would have voted in favor of the introduction of slaves. For a counter-revolution had been silently proceeding for some years previous, and had almost eradicated the lessons and the principles of the Revolution from the hearts of the South, saving,
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Assembly at its last session, for the Abolition of Slavery, but they could scarcely obtain a reading.--Ibid., vol. IX., p. 163. In a remarkable and very interesting letter written by Lafayette in the prison of Magdeburg, he said: I know not what disposition has been made of my plantation at Cayenne; but I hope Madam De Lafayette will take care that the negroes who cultivate it shall preserve their liberty. The following language is also Lafayette's, in a letter to Hamilton, from Paris, April 13, 1785: In one of your New York Gazettes, I find an association against the Slavery of the negroes, which seems to me worded in such a way as to give no offense to the moderate men in the Southern States. As I have ever been partial to my brethren of that color, I wish, if you are one in the society, you would move, in your own name, for my being admitted on the list.--Works of Alex. Hamilton, N. Y., 1851, vol. i., p. 423. John Adams, in a letter to Robert J. Evans, June 8
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
. The only, and not very accurate, allusion to him that I have been able to find in that immense work, is as follows: The Upland Cotton is a different species from the Sea Island, and is separated with such difficulty from the seed, that the expense of cleaning the wool must have put a stop to its further cultivation, had not a machine, by which the operation of cleaning is easily and successfully accomplished, been invented. This machine was invented in 1795, by Mr. Eli Whitney, of Massachusetts. There are two qualities of this cotton, the one termed Upland Georgia, grown in the States of Georgia and South Carolina, and the other of superior quality, raised upon the banks of the Mississippi, and distinguished in the market by the name of New Orleans cotton, &c., &c.--Encyclopoedia Britannica, Eighth (last) Edition, vol. VII., p. 447. Truly, the world knows little of its greatest men. The African Slave-Trade, so far as it had any legal or tolerated existence, was perem
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
oto himself, had formed any adequate conception of the importance of their discovery, of the magnitude of the river, or of the extent and fertility of the regions drained by its tributaries; since more than a century was allowed to transpire before the Mississippi was revisited by civilized men. And its next discoverers were not Spaniards, but Frenchmen ; although Spain had long possessed and colonized Florida and Mexico on either side of its mouth. But the French--now firmly established in Canada, and penetrating by their traders and voyageurs the wild region stretching westward and south-westward from that Colony — obtained from the savages some account of this river about the year 1660; and in 1673, Marquette and Joliet, proceeding westward from Montreal, through the Great Lakes, reached the Mississippi above its junction with the Missouri, and descended it to within three days journey of its mouth. In 1682, La Salle descended it to the Gulf of Mexico, and took formal possession o
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
government of the western territory of the United States; which ordinance shall, in all its parts, ignominious; and. in fact, in those of the United States in which slaves are the most numerous, gentual total extirpation of Slavery from the United States. * * * I have, through my whole life, heldam Henry Harrison — since President of the United States--as Governor. Its earlier settlements werfor the government of the Territory of the United States North-West of the river Ohio. And heres render it impossible that France and the United States can continue long friends, when they meet for spoliations and other damages; and the United States became the unquestioned owner and possessoantages, and immunities of citizens of the United States. And, in the mean time, they should be maantages, and immunities of citizens of the United States, to the colored as well as the white Louisds, daughter of the Hon. Pierpont Edwards, United States District Judge for Connecticut; and four c[7 more...]
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
homes of their childhood to the strange and repulsive swamps and forests of the far South-West, is harsher and viler than any other system of bondage on which the sun ever shone. And when we add that it has been carefully computed that the State of Virginia, since the date of the purchase of Louisiana, had received more money for her own flesh and blood, regularly sold and exported, than her soil and all that was upon it would have sold for on the day when she seceded from the Union, we need ahe test of every trial. Its mission is to subdue the unbroken regions of the warm and fertile South, and its end is the happiness and civilization of the human race, including the race of the slave, in all respects. Said Mr. Jas. M. Mason, of Va., in the debate of the following day: As to the slave population, I agree with the Senator from South Carolina. if a problem, it has worked itself out; the thing is settled here, so far as the South is concerned, or the opinions and purposes o
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