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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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March 4th (search for this): chapter 3
ol and forage to replenish its stores. Its garrison had been reported at 20,000 men; but had been reduced by successive detachments to 2,000 or 3,000. Com. Foote, on returning from Clarksville to Cairo, speedily collected a flotilla of six gunboats, apparently for service at Nashville; but, when all was ready, dropped down the Mississippi, followed by three transports, conveying some 2,000 or 3,000 soldiers, under Gen. W. T. Sherman, while a supporting force moved overland from Paducah. March 4. Arriving opposite Columbus, he learned that the last of the Rebels had left some hours before, after burning 18,000 bushels of corn, 5,000 tons of hay, their cavalry stables, and much other property; while many of their heavy guns, which they were unable to take away, had been rolled off the bluff, here 150 feet high, into the river. The 2d Illinois cavalry, Col. Hogg, from Paducah, had entered and taken possession the evening before. A massive chain,/un> intended to bar the descent of t
March 16th (search for this): chapter 3
resistance, and pushing on to Prestonburg, Floyd county; hear which town, at the forks of Middle creek, he encountered Marshall, whom he put to flight with little loss on either side. Garfield reported his full strength in this engagement at 1,800, and estimated that of Marshall at 2,500. Marshall was obliged to retreat into Virginia. Cumberland Gap was abandoned without resistance to the Unionists next month; About Feb. 22. and Gen. Garfield, with 600 men, made a rapid excursion March 16. to Pound Gap, where he surprised a Rebel camp, capturing 300 rifles, destroying the camp equipage, and returning to Pikeville without loss. Gen. Zollicoffer, at the close of 1861, held a position on the Cumberland, near the head of steamboat navigation on that sinuous stream, which may be regarded as the right of the Rebel army covering Tennessee and holding a small part of southern Kentucky. His force did not exceed 5,000 men; but even this was with great difficulty meagerly subsiste
June 26th (search for this): chapter 3
had carried the works by a charge, capturing 9 guns and about 30 prisoners, including Col. Frye, the commandant. The expedition failed to effect its purpose. The triumphant Union fleet soon proceeded down the river, encountering no serious obstacle till near Vicksburg, June 24. where it communicated with Com. Farragut, whose fleet from the Gulf lay below this natural stronghold, accompanied by Gen. Williams, with four regiments of infantry. The Rebel fortifications were bombarded June 26. for several hours, without result; but Lt.-Col. Ellet, with two rains, went that day up the Yazoo river, to capture three Rebel gunboats, which, on his approach, were set on fire and impelled down the current, with intent to envelop our vessels in the flames. The Rebel boats were destroyed. The siege of Vicksburg was continued by our fleet, and a determined attack made on it July 1, but defeated. The Rebel ram Arkansas came down July 15. the Yazoo, ran through the astonished Union
March 12th (search for this): chapter 3
l cannonade of two hours; returning thence to Danville and reporting. The movement of the army southward on transports was continued — the 46th Ohio, Col. Worthington, leading, on the transport B. J. Adams--so far as Savannah, where it was landed, March 10. and proceeded to take military possession. All the transports, 69 in number, conveying nearly 40,000 men, were soon debarking the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where the railroad was destroyed. Gen. Sherman's first division was next March 14. conveyed up the river to Tyler's Landing, just across the Mississippi State line; whence the 6th Ohio cavalry was dispatched to Burnsville, on the Memphis and Charleston road, some miles eastward of Corinth, which was likewise destroyed without resistance. The expedition then returned unmolested to Savannah. These easy successes, and the fact that no enemy came n
March 14th (search for this): chapter 3
ontinued — the 46th Ohio, Col. Worthington, leading, on the transport B. J. Adams--so far as Savannah, where it was landed, March 10. and proceeded to take military possession. All the transports, 69 in number, conveying nearly 40,000 men, were soon debarking the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where the railroad was destroyed. Gen. Sherman's first division was next March 14. conveyed up the river to Tyler's Landing, just across the Mississippi State line; whence the 6th Ohio cavalry was dispatched to Burnsville, on the Memphis and Charleston road, some miles eastward of Corinth, which was likewise destroyed without resistance. The expedition then returned unmolested to Savannah. These easy successes, and the fact that no enemy came near or seemed to meditate annoyance, must have imbued our leading officers with a contempt for the power or the prowess of th
June 24th (search for this): chapter 3
ith pain, and were drowned; while the boats sent from the Conestoga to their relief, were fired on by the Rebels with grape and canister, killing most of our scalded and frantic fugitives. In a few minutes, Col. Fitch had carried the works by a charge, capturing 9 guns and about 30 prisoners, including Col. Frye, the commandant. The expedition failed to effect its purpose. The triumphant Union fleet soon proceeded down the river, encountering no serious obstacle till near Vicksburg, June 24. where it communicated with Com. Farragut, whose fleet from the Gulf lay below this natural stronghold, accompanied by Gen. Williams, with four regiments of infantry. The Rebel fortifications were bombarded June 26. for several hours, without result; but Lt.-Col. Ellet, with two rains, went that day up the Yazoo river, to capture three Rebel gunboats, which, on his approach, were set on fire and impelled down the current, with intent to envelop our vessels in the flames. The Rebel boat
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