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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Decatur (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbia and all south of the Tennessee, burning the railroad bridges at Decatur and Bridgeport, but holding firmly and peaceably all of Alabama north of that river. Had he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have capt
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ng the boundary between what are designated respectively West and Middle Tennessee, thence flowing N. N. W. till it falls into the Ohio scarcely 70 miles above the mouth of that river, whereof it is the largest tributary, draining an area of over 40,000 square miles. Very rarely frozen, it is usually navigable, save in dry summers, from its mouth to the Muscle Shoals, toward the lower end of its course through Alabama, and thence by smaller boats at high stages of water some 500 miles, to Knoxville, the capital of East Tennessee. The Cumberland, draining the opposite slope of the Cumberland Mountains, takes its rise in the heart of eastern Kentucky, and, pursuing a similar but shorter course, runs W. S. W. into Middle Tennessee, which it traverses very much as the Tennessee does northern Alabama, passing Nashville, its capital, bending N. W. into Kentucky some 20 miles eastward of the latter river, and pursuing a generally parallel course to that stream, to its own reception by the
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
cksburg Grant moves up the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing Sidney Johnston advances from Corinth, essee, meeting their first resistance at Pittsburg Landing, an insignificant two-house nucleus of award, to be lost in the Tennessee. At Pittsburg Landing, the Tyler found a Rebel battery of six d behind McClernand, with its right near Pittsburg Landing and its front somewhat protected by the , says: We had lain three weeks at Pittsburg Landing, within 20 miles of the Rebels, that werr of a dense scrub-oak thicket in our Pittsburg Landing. Explanations. A positions of Maj.-Gcrosses the creek at its mouth, close by Pittsburg Landing. This countermarch delayed his junctionked the enemy in strong position in front of Pittsburg; and, after a severe battle of ten hours, thry as well as cannon in the direction of Pittsburg Landing dispelled this illusion. Buell hastened battles, April 19, 1862. and reached Pittsburg Landing by steamboat two or three days thereafte[2 more...]
Henry, Marshall County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
hey were within 600 yards of the Rebel guns, whereof all but four had by this time been silenced: one having burst, disabling every man who served it, while the vent of the great 10-inch columbiad had been closed. rendering it useless; while our fire at short range grew hotter and hotter. Gen. McClernand, as Com. Foote had apprehended, had not yet worked his way through the miry woods and over the difficult trails he was obliged to traverse in order to reach and occupy the main road from Henry to Donelson. Had he been directed to start at 6 instead of 11 that morning, he would probably have intercepted and captured Tilghman's entire force. As it was, the latter says he ordered all but the hundred or so inside the fort, and employed ill working its guns, to take the road to Donelson, under Col. Heiman, his second in command; and that order was obeyed with great promptness and celerity. Tilghman remained himself with the handful in the fort; and, at 1:45 P. M., seeing further def
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
he Confederate forces in south-eastern Kentucky, intrenched at Paintville, Johnson county, intent on gathering supplies and recruiting. Col. James A. Garfield, of Ohio, commanding a Union brigade consisting of the 42d Ohio, 14th Kentucky, and a squadron of Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Jan. 7, 1862. without resistance, and pushing on to Prestonburg, Floyd county; hear which town, at the forks of Middle creek, he encountered Marshall, whom he put to flight with little loss on either side. Garfield reported his full strength in this engagement at 1,800, and estimated that of Marshall at 2,500. Marshall was obln a skirmish, in which he took 200 prisoners, striking the Charleston and Memphis Railroad at Glendale, three miles farther, and partially destroying it; while the Ohio road was in like manner broken at Purdy. Col. Elliott, with two regiments of cavalry, was dispatched on the night of the 27th to flank Corinth and cut the railr
Mill Spring (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
g a small part of southern Kentucky. His force did not exceed 5,000 men; but even this was with great difficulty meagerly subsisted by inexorable foraging on that thinly settled and poorly cultivated region. His principal camp was at Mill Spring, in Wayne county, on the south side of the river; but, finding himself unmolested, he established himself on the opposite bank, in a substantial earthwork, which he named Camp Beach Grove. He had one small steamboat, which had run up with munitions fr side, feebly responded to on the other; and this continued until 7 at night, when our soldiers desisted and lay down to rest. Gen. Schoepf's brigade came up that night, and were so disposed by Gen. Thomas as to make sure of the capture of Mill Spring. the enemy. At daylight, their little steamer was seen lying in the river, and was quickly set on fire by our shells; cutting off, as was fondly calculated, all chance of farther Rebel retreat. Fire was then opened on their intrenchments, bu
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
sent up from Dover, 1,134 wounded. A Federal surgeon's certificate, which I have seen, says that there were about 400 Confederate prisoners wounded in hospital at Paducah, making 1,534 wounded. I was satisfied the killed would increase the number to 2,000. Pollard gives what he terms a correct list, by regiments, of the Confederdown the Mississippi, followed by three transports, conveying some 2,000 or 3,000 soldiers, under Gen. W. T. Sherman, while a supporting force moved overland from Paducah. March 4. Arriving opposite Columbus, he learned that the last of the Rebels had left some hours before, after burning 18,000 bushels of corn, 5,000 tons of haheir heavy guns, which they were unable to take away, had been rolled off the bluff, here 150 feet high, into the river. The 2d Illinois cavalry, Col. Hogg, from Paducah, had entered and taken possession the evening before. A massive chain,/un> intended to bar the descent of the Mississippi, had here been stretched across the gre
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
lood, menaced the approach by water for a mile on either hand, but was overlooked by three points So says Gen. Tilghman's official report. within cannon-shot on either bank of the river. It covered two or three acres of ground, mounted 17 large guns, 11 of them bearing upon any vessels approaching from below, with a spacious intrenched camp in its rear, and a wide abatis encircling all. It was defended by Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, with 2,600 men. To Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, of Illinois, was assigned the task of its reduction, with the powerful aid of Commodore A. H. Foote and his fleet of seven gunboats, four of them partially iron-clad. Leaving Cairo Feb. 2, 1862. with some 15,000 men on steam transports, he moved up the Ohio to the mouth of the Tennessee, then ascended that stream to within ten miles of Fort Henry, where his transports halted, Feb. 4-5. while Com. Foote, with his gunboats, proceeded cautiously up the river, shelling the woods on either side to di
Booneville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Paine to Farmington, May 21. five miles N. W. of Corinth, had brought on a skirmish, in which he took 200 prisoners, striking the Charleston and Memphis Railroad at Glendale, three miles farther, and partially destroying it; while the Ohio road was in like manner broken at Purdy. Col. Elliott, with two regiments of cavalry, was dispatched on the night of the 27th to flank Corinth and cut the railroad south of it, so as to intercept the enemy's supplies. He struck it on the 30th, at Booneville, 24 miles from Corinth, in the midst of an unexpected retreat of the Rebel army, which had commenced on the 26th. Beaurefgard had held Corinth so long as possible against Halleck's overwhelming force, and had commenced its evacuation by sending off a part of his sick and wounded. Elliott captured 20 cars, laden with small arms, ammunition, stores, baggage, &c., with some hundreds of Confederate sick, whom he paroled, burning the engine and trains. The evacuation was completed during the
Glendale (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
saw fit not to flank these formidable defenses, but to overcome them by regular and necessarily slow approaches, involving constant and mutual artillery practice and picket fighting, with very little loss; three weeks of which brought our nearest batteries within three miles of Corinth. May 21. A reconnoissance under Gen. Paine to Farmington, May 21. five miles N. W. of Corinth, had brought on a skirmish, in which he took 200 prisoners, striking the Charleston and Memphis Railroad at Glendale, three miles farther, and partially destroying it; while the Ohio road was in like manner broken at Purdy. Col. Elliott, with two regiments of cavalry, was dispatched on the night of the 27th to flank Corinth and cut the railroad south of it, so as to intercept the enemy's supplies. He struck it on the 30th, at Booneville, 24 miles from Corinth, in the midst of an unexpected retreat of the Rebel army, which had commenced on the 26th. Beaurefgard had held Corinth so long as possible aga
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