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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Washington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
is own, with a loss of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbia and all south of the Tennessee, burning the railroad bridges at Decatur and Bridgeport, but holding firmly and peaceably all of Alabama north of that river. Had he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have captured Chattanooga; which was assailed, June 6. under his orders, by Gen. Negley, who was driven off by a Rebel force under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. Mitchel's activity and energy poorly qualified him for a subordinate position under Buell; so he was transferred, in June, to the command at Port Royal, S. C., where he died. Oct. 20. Gen. Halleck was likewise summoned July 23. from the West to serve as General-in-Chief at Washington, leaving Gen. Grant in command at Corinth.
Tuscumbia (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
lville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of a life. He took April 29. Bridgeport, Ala., with a force of five regiments, by striking rapidly and attacking from a quarter whence he was not looked for, driving out a force nearly equal in number to his own, with a loss of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbia and all south of the Tennessee, burning the railroad bridges at Decatur and Bridgeport, but holding firmly and peaceably all of Alabama north of that river. Had he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have captured Chattanooga; which was assailed, June 6. under his orders, by Gen. Negley, who was driven off by a Rebel force under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. Mitchel's activity and energy
Bacon Creek, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
son, upon Bowling Green, the Rebel stronghold in Kentucky, where Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston had succeeded to the command, while Gen. Beauregard had been sent him from the east as a reenforcement. But Johnston's force, enormously and purposely magnified by current report, had never amounted to 25,000 effectives, and had ere this in good part been sent to the defense of Donelson, until it had been reduced to about 7,000 or 8,000 men. As Mitchel advanced across Green river from his camp at Bacon creek, Johnston commenced his retreat on Nashville; so that, when Mitchel had reached Feb. 14. the north bank of Barren river, and looked across into Bowling Green, sending over Col. Turchin's brigade during the night, at a ferry a mile and a half below, he found the railroad depot on fire, with 7 locomotives, and a large amount of corn and other provisions, with the bridges of course destroyed, and the last of the Rebel army, consisting of Texas Rangers, just moving off on a railroad train,
Barren river (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
while Gen. Beauregard had been sent him from the east as a reenforcement. But Johnston's force, enormously and purposely magnified by current report, had never amounted to 25,000 effectives, and had ere this in good part been sent to the defense of Donelson, until it had been reduced to about 7,000 or 8,000 men. As Mitchel advanced across Green river from his camp at Bacon creek, Johnston commenced his retreat on Nashville; so that, when Mitchel had reached Feb. 14. the north bank of Barren river, and looked across into Bowling Green, sending over Col. Turchin's brigade during the night, at a ferry a mile and a half below, he found the railroad depot on fire, with 7 locomotives, and a large amount of corn and other provisions, with the bridges of course destroyed, and the last of the Rebel army, consisting of Texas Rangers, just moving off on a railroad train, which had been retained for the purpose. The river, being wide and at a high stage, could not here be crossed till next c
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Iii. Kentucky--Tennessee--Alabama. Battle of Mill Spring capture of Fort Henry naval bombMountains, takes its rise in the heart of eastern Kentucky, and, pursuing a similar but shorter courng Nashville, its capital, bending N. W. into Kentucky some 20 miles eastward of the latter river, ang Tennessee and holding a small part of southern Kentucky. His force did not exceed 5,000 men; bu strength from all our forces in that part of Kentucky, resolved to anticipate it; A Rebel lettermiles of each other, a few miles south of the Kentucky line, and north of the Louisville and Memphisl. It was defended by Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, with 2,600 men. To Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grantly followed by important successes throughout Kentucky and in Tennessee. Gen. Don Carlos Buell haides three Free States, Tennessee, and all of Kentucky east of the Cumberland, with his headquartersHon. Geo. W. Johnson. Provisional Governor of Kentucky, was killed on Monday, having had his horse s[4 more...]
Johnson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Mississippi, navigable southward from the border of the Free into the Slave States--were obviously regarded on both sides, in view of the notorious impracticability of Southern roads in Winter and Spring, as the natural routes of advance for our Western armies collected and drilled on and near the Ohio during the Autumn of 1861 and the Winter following. The close of 1861 left Gen. Humphrey Marshall, commanding the Confederate forces in south-eastern Kentucky, intrenched at Paintville, Johnson county, intent on gathering supplies and recruiting. Col. James A. Garfield, of Ohio, commanding a Union brigade consisting of the 42d Ohio, 14th Kentucky, and a squadron of Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Jan. 7, 1862. without resistance, and pushing on to Prestonburg, Floyd county; hear which town, at the forks of Middle creek, he encountered Marshall, whom he put to flight with little loss on either side. Garfield reported his full strength in th
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
y for the possession of a point of timber some 500 yards east of Shiloh church. Hence the Rebel army could be seen re-forming its lines to the southward, with a battery by the church, and another near the Hamburg road, pouring grape and canister into any column of our troops that advanced upon that green point of timber whence Willich's regiment had just been repulsed, but into which one of McCook's brigades (Rousseau's) was now advancing. Directing the fire of two 24-pound howitzers of McAllister's battery upon the Rebel guns, Sherman formed his two brigades (David Stuart's, now commanded by Col. T. Kilby Smith, and Col. Buckland's) to advance in line with Rousseau; which they did superbly, sweeping every thing before them. At 4 P. M., our soldiers held the original front line whence we had been so hurriedly driven 34 hours before; and the whole Rebel army was retreating, unpursued, on Corinth. An impressed New-Yorker says: No heroism of officers or men could avail to sta
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
arms wherever night found them, to gather strength and refreshment fir the inevitable struggle of the morrow. Before seeking his couch in the little church at Shiloh, the surviving Rebel leader dispatched a messenger to Corinth with this exhilarating dispatch for Richmond: battle-field of Shiloh, Via Corinth and ChattanoShiloh, Via Corinth and Chattanooga, April 6th, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General: We have this morning attacked the enemy in strong position in front of Pittsburg; and, after a severe battle of ten hours, thanks to Almighty God, gained a complete victory, driving the enemy from every position. The loss on both sides is heavy, including our commanderwhich he repulsed, destroying a camp, and capturing a hospital, wherein lie found 280 Confederate and 50 Union wounded; returning with the former to his camp near Shiloh next morning. Beauregard, in his official report, states that his effective force had now been reduced, from exhaustion and other causes, from 40,000 to less t
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
rks by a charge, capturing 9 guns and about 30 prisoners, including Col. Frye, the commandant. The expedition failed to effect its purpose. The triumphant Union fleet soon proceeded down the river, encountering no serious obstacle till near Vicksburg, June 24. where it communicated with Com. Farragut, whose fleet from the Gulf lay below this natural stronghold, accompanied by Gen. Williams, with four regiments of infantry. The Rebel fortifications were bombarded June 26. for several The siege of Vicksburg was continued by our fleet, and a determined attack made on it July 1, but defeated. The Rebel ram Arkansas came down July 15. the Yazoo, ran through the astonished Union fleet, and took refuge under the batteries of Vicksburg, unharmed. Repeated attempts to destroy or sink her July 15-22. were defeated by the shore batteries; and, on the 24th, the siege was raised; Com. Farragut, with Gen. Williams, returning down the river; while Com. Davis, with his fleet, ste
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
y. New Madrid Island no.10 Fort Pillow Memphis first siege of Vicksburg Grant moves up the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing Sidney Johnston advances from Corinth, Miss. assails Grant's front near Shiloh Church Sherman and McClernand driven Grant borne back Buell and Lew Wallace arrive the Rebels driven losses Halleck t this was soon abandoned upon information that Gen. Johnston had decided not to fight for Nashville, but to continue his retreat; which he did, unassailed, to Corinth, Miss., south of the Tennessee river, and nearly 300 miles from Bowling Green. Six weeks were consumed in that retreat; which, with a green and undisciplined army, weting their first resistance at Pittsburg Landing, an insignificant two-house nucleus of a prospective village, 8 miles above Savannah and 20 miles N. N.E. of Corinth, Miss., at the junction of the Memphis and Charleston with the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. The country hence to Corinth is rolling, and generally wooded. Two or thre
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