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Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ntial election of 1864 both Lincoln and Chase offer Butler the Vice-presidency embarkation at Yorktown and seizure of City Point Drury's Bluff should have been seized at once fortifying the neck Not knowing the force of the enemy, and Kilpatrick's men being recruiting from their march at Yorktown, I asked his aid to meet this advance, which was promptly and kindly given, and the movement of the purpose of joining Grant's army. I could gather the water craft to transport my army from Yorktown, Gloucester, and Fortress Monroe in twenty-four hours, so as to be up the James River at City Pond by the river. To divert the enemy's attention, all the white troops were concentrated at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalrcommanding the department. See Appendix No. 25. On the 4th of May the embarkation began at Yorktown, See Appendix No. 26. of the Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps, under the command of Generals
Adelbert Ames (search for this): chapter 16
o that nothing should be lost because of any disagreement between my corps commanders, neither of whom really desired that the other should succeed. At daybreak on the 12th, all the movements were made in conformity with these orders. Brigadier-General Ames' brigade was posted near Port Walthall Junction to cover our rear from the enemy's forces arriving at Petersburg from the South. The enemy met us at Proctor or Mill Creek, and after several severe engagements were forced back into their antage gained did not prove decisive. The 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th were consumed in manoeuvring and awaiting the arrival of reinforcements from Washington. Believing the information to be true I sent a despatch at 7 P. M. to General Ames, who was watching the enemy at Petersburg, General Butler's horse. enclosing glorious news from Grant, and asking him to guard against surprise and night attack, and to report to me frequently. See Appendix No. 49. Having sent away Gene
Charles K. Graham (search for this): chapter 16
he recruits that State would furnish to the Union, and these were employed in defending the lighthouses and protecting the loyal inhabitants from the outrages of their immediate neighbors. January 25, 1864, the roads being impassable, Brigadier-General Graham, with some armed transports, went up the James River to Lower Brandon and destroyed a large quantity of provisions and forage stored there, and captured some smuggling vessels. Major-General Pickett, of the Confederate forces, made ansford, and thence to join us at City Point. Col. Robert West, with eighteen hundred colored cavalry, moved at the same time from Williamsburg to meet us at Turkey Bend, opposite City Point. The armed transports, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Charles K. Graham, moved at night on the 4th up James River, destroyed the enemy's signal stations, and arrived at City Point at 11 A. M., of the 5th, finding no torpedoes. This service was most gallantly and skilfully performed. At daylight of the
John J. Peck (search for this): chapter 16
aptured by General Pickett. By his order they were tried by court martial and twenty-two of them were hanged. Their supposed offence was that they, being enrolled in the Confederate army, had enlisted in the Union army. Upon remonstrance by General Peck, commanding in North Carolina, Pickett replied, that being deserters they were executed by his orders, and if retaliation was attempted he would execute ten United States soldiers for every one upon whom we retaliated, unless, indeed, the Confcoln. Right again, said Cameron; I will tell Mr. Lincoln every word you have said. What happened after that is history. Preparations were pushed with vigor for the opening campaign. During the early days of April despatches came from General Peck that the enemy were preparing to attack Plymouth. General Wessels, in command there, however, whose gallant defence of the place is applauded, gave me his belief that the post could be held, if the navy could hold the river. Commander Flus
Alfred Terry (search for this): chapter 16
he 9th was going on, the enemy, advancing from Richmond upon our rear, attacked the covering force of the Tenth Corps under Colonel Voorhis of the Sixty-Seventh Ohio, and for a moment forced him back, although he gallantly held his position. General Terry, with the reserve of that corps, advanced from Port Walthall Junction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was g
A. V. Kautz (search for this): chapter 16
rked at Fortress Monroe. At sunrise of the 5th, General Kautz, with three thousand cavalry, moved from Suffolk commander. I was tempted to go myself, but I had Kautz out before the enemy, and West with his negro cavalrearly as possible, without waiting for the report of Kautz's cavalry which were to cut the railroad south of Pef his force, was, by the cutting of the railroads by Kautz's cavalry, left south of Petersburg, while the porting of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. ndix No. 45. Wishing to have the assistance of General Kautz's cavalry in the contemplated movement I gave thorks, unless he [General Smith] is forced back. General Kautz has orders to proceed as soon as the demonstratie to the instructions of the lieutenant-general, General Kautz was sent with his cavalry by those roads to cut ntly. See Appendix No. 49. Having sent away General Kautz with his cavalry, in obedience to instructions,
Wm F. Smith (search for this): chapter 16
emed to me, when I wrote it, to be just, as it did at the time of the occurrence, and so I choose to let it stand; but since then I have seen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he disobeyed,--he had a consultation upon the situation with Maj.-Gen. Wm F. Smith, and got advice from him as to what he should do, which seems to have determined his conduct. So that censure, and very much more, belongs to Smith. Decorative Motif.emed to me, when I wrote it, to be just, as it did at the time of the occurrence, and so I choose to let it stand; but since then I have seen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he disobeyed,--he had a consultation upon the situation with Maj.-Gen. Wm F. Smith, and got advice from him as to what he should do, which seems to have determined his conduct. So that censure, and very much more, belongs to Smith. Decorative Motif.
Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 16
co-operate with me. But after considerable correspondence he telegraphed that he could not get ready in time. On the 4th of March I received notice that General Kilpatrick had started, with a cavalry force, on a raid to Richmond from the Army of the Potomac, and was directed to make dispositions to aid him, or cover with infantry his march to Fortress Monroe. Accordingly I marched a column to New Kent Court-House, and there met General Kilpatrick on his return. On the 9th of March the Confederates made a demonstration upon our lines at Suffolk. Not knowing the force of the enemy, and Kilpatrick's men being recruiting from their march at Yorktown, Kilpatrick's men being recruiting from their march at Yorktown, I asked his aid to meet this advance, which was promptly and kindly given, and the movement of the enemy handsomely met and repulsed. When I had reported for duty to Mr. Stanton in obedience to his order to take command, he informed me of the probable importance of my department in the campaign of the coming spring and summer,
Bushrod Johnson (search for this): chapter 16
ad been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was granted. On the morning of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. He had failed to reach Hicksford, but had burned the Stony Creek bridge, the Nottoway Bridge, and Jarratt's Station, and captured about one hundred and thirty prisoners, with a loss to his command of about thirty, killed and
E. W. Hincks (search for this): chapter 16
s), about fifty-five hundred men, under command of Brig.-Gen. E. W. Hincks, embarked at Fortress Monroe. At sunrise of the 5lthough he lost an arm at the battle of Gettysburg. General Hincks, with the remainder of his division, seized City Pointverlooked the Bermuda side. We occupied this point by General Hincks with his colored troops, and a very strong redoubt was destroy the bridges across it. Cooperating with this, General Hincks was to move on the south side of the Appomattox upon Pe line of the creek. Orders were prepared and sent to General Hincks for that purpose. At the close of the consultation heorces to be drawn to the front of General Smith, from whom Hincks should have word before engaging the enemy. See Appendio objection. After he retired, I sent a despatch to General Hincks informing him that the news received from the Army of ccupy, during the night, the line of advance secured. General Hincks has orders to seize and hold a point [on the Appomatto
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