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Owl Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
aw men timid. The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front; and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing the space over which we coulattached to Hildebrand's brigade, and cautioned the men to reserve their fire till the rebels had crossed the ravine of Owl Creek, and had begun the ascent; also, sent staff-officers to notify Generals McClernand and Prentiss of the coming blow. In and artillery at a point about five miles in my front, sent a detachment to the lane of General Meaks, on the north of Owl Creek, and the cavalry down toward our camp. This cavalry captured a part of our advance pickets, and afterward engaged the nel Worthington; and the Morton battery, Captain Behr, on the extreme right, guarding the bridge on the Purdy road over Owl Creek. Second Brigade, composed of the Fifty-fifth Illinois, Colonel D. Stuart; the Fifty-fourth Ohio, Colonel T. Kilby Sm
Bear Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
or by a rickety telegraph-line up to Fort Henry, which lay entirely in a hostile country, and was consequently always out of repair. On the 1st of March I received the following dispatch, and forwarded it to General Grant, both by the telegraph and boat: St. Louis, March 1, 1862. To General Grant, Fort Henry: Transports will be sent you as soon as possible, to move your column up the Tennessee River. The main object of this expedition will be to destroy the railroad-bridge over Bear Creek, near Eastport, Mississippi; and also the railroad connections at Corinth, Jackson, and Humboldt. It is thought best that these objects be attempted in the order named. Strong detachments of cavalry and light artillery, supported by infantry, may by rapid movements reach these points from the river, without any serious opposition. Avoid any general engagements with strong forces. It will be better to retreat than to risk a general battle. This should be strongly impressed on the off
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
uart's) temporarily at a place on the Hamburg Road, near Lick Creek Ford, where the Bark Road came into the Hamburg Road. Wam, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front; and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing tStuart's brigade to the left front, to watch the pass of Lick Creek; and I shall this morning move directly out on the Corinee miles, and push a strong reconnoissance as far out as Lick Creek and Pea Ridge. I will send down a good many boats to-lonel Mason, on the extreme left, guarding the ford over Lick Creek. Third Brigade, composed of the Seventy-seventh Ohio,I am satisfied the enemy's infantry and artillery passed Lick Creek this morning, traveling all of last night, and that he lng, and had ordered Lew Wallace's division to cross over Lick Creek, so as to come up on my right, telling me to look out folained to him that my right then covered the bridge over Lick Creek by which we had all day been expecting Lew Wallace; that
Eastport (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
h, elevated ground, accessible at all seasons from the country to the rear. Upon personal inspection, I attach little importance to Chickasaw as a military position. The people, who had fled during the approach of the gunboats, returned to the village, and said the place had been occupied by one Tennessee regiment and a battery of artillery from Pensacola. After remaining at Chickasaw some hours, all the boats dropped back to Eastport, not more than a mile below, and landed there. Eastport Landing during the late freshet must have been about twelve feet under water, but at the present stage the landing is the best I have seen on the Tennessee River. The levee is clear of trees or snags, and a hundred boats could land there without confusion. The soil is of sand and gravel, and very firm. The road back is hard, and at a distance of about four hundred yards from the water begin the gravel hills of the country. The infantry scouts sent out by Colonel Hildebrand found the ene
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
alley of the Mississippi, from his headquarters in St. Louis. These were, the Army of the Ohio, Major-General Buell, in Kentucky; the Army of the Tennessee, Major-General Grant, at Forts Henry and Donelson; and General S. R. Curtis, in Southern Missthe line of McClernand's camp, and here I saw for the first time the well-ordered and compact columns of General Buell's Kentucky forces, whose soldierly movements at once gave confidence to our newer and less disciplined men. Here I saw Willich's reg wounded) to form on its right, and my fourth brigade, Colonel Buckland, on its right; all to advance abreast with this Kentucky brigade before mentioned, which I afterward found to be Rousseau's brigade of McCook's division. I gave personal directt where I think it is due, and censure where I think it merited. I concede that General McCook's splendid division from Kentucky drove back the enemy along the Corinth road, which was the great centre of this field of battle, where Beauregard comman
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
o destroy the railroad-bridge over Bear Creek, near Eastport, Mississippi; and also the railroad connections at Corinth, Jackk, United States Navy. I was to land at some point below Eastport, and make a break of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, bLanding. We went on up the river cautiously, till we saw Eastport and Chickasaw, both of which were occupied by rebel batteion of infantry under Colonel Ilildebrand to disembark at Eastport, and with the other battalion proceeded to Chickasaw and g the late freshet, and led to the removal of the guns to Eastport, where the batteries were on high, elevated ground, accesng at Chickasaw some hours, all the boats dropped back to Eastport, not more than a mile below, and landed there. Eastport nted, and watching the Iuca road, about two miles back of Eastport. The distance to Iuca is only eight miles, and Iuca is tslodge the enemy from the batteries recently erected near Eastport, and this being attained, I have returned, and report the
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
lowing the two gunboats, and, in passing Pittsburg Landing, was told by Captain Gwin that, on his fe river, he ought to post some troops at Pittsburg Landing. We went on up the river cautiously, tire embarked, I concluded to drop down to Pittsburg Landing, and to make the attempt from there. Duhe night of the 14th, we dropped down to Pittsburg Landing, where I found Hurlbut's division in boaivision, and that of General Hurlbut, at Pittsburg Landing; to take positions well back, and to leaillery and infantry disposed so as to defend Pittsburg, leaving my division entire for any movementerned by your orders of yesterday, to occupy Pittsburg strongly, extend the pickets so as to includision. headquarters, steamboat Continental, Pittsburg, March 18, 1862. Captain Rawlins, Assistant -General. headquarters first division, Pittsburg Landing, March 19, 1862. Captain Rawlins, Assistcumseh. The gunboat Cairo did not arrive at Pittsburg, until after midnight, and at 6 A. M. Captai[4 more...]
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ed his chief of staff, General Cullum, at Cairo, and me at Paducah, chiefly to expedite and facilitate tile important operatitting away from him, and began to send dispatches to me at Paducah, to be forwarded by boat, or by a rickety telegraph-line u the Tennessee River; transports will also be collected at Paducah. Two gunboats in Tennessee River with Grant. General Graat General Halleck should have been patient. Meantime, at Paducah, I was busy sending boats in every direction — some under was organizing out of the new troops that were arriving at Paducah a division for myself when allowed to take the field, whicary orders from General Halleck, I embarked my division at Paducah. It was composed of four brigades. The First, commanded ck, except chronic cases, which can always be sent down to Paducah. Magnificent plain for camping and drilling, and a milily all having received their muskets for the first time at Paducah. None of them had ever been under fire or beheld heavy co
Burnsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
the river cautiously, till we saw Eastport and Chickasaw, both of which were occupied by rebel batteries and a small rebel force of infantry. We then dropped back quietly to the mouth of Yellow River, a few miles below, whence led a road to Burnsville, a place on the Memphis & Charleston road, where were the company's repair-shops. We at once commenced disembarking the command: first the cavalry, which started at once for Burnsville, with orders to tear up the railroad-track, and burn the dBurnsville, with orders to tear up the railroad-track, and burn the depots, shops, etc; and I followed with the infantry and artillery as fast as they were disembarked. It was raining very hard at the time. Daylight found us about six miles out, where we met the cavalry returning. They had made numerous attempts to cross the streams, which had become so swollen that mere brooks covered the whole bottom; and my aide-de-camp, Sanger, whom I had dispatched with the cavalry, reported the loss, by drowning, of several of the men. The rain was pouring in torrents, a
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
itate tile important operations then in progress up the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. Fort Donelson surrendered to General Grant on the 16th of February, and there must have been a good deal of confusion resulting from the necessary care of the wounded, and disposition of prisoners, common to all such occasions, and there was a real difficulty in communicating between St. Louis and Fort Donelson. General Buell had also followed up the rebel army, which had retreated hastily from Bowling Green to and through Nashville, a city of so much importance to the South, that it was at one time proposed as its capital. Both Generals Grant and Buell looked to its capture as an event of great importance. On the 21st General Grant sent General Smith with his division to Clarksville, fifty miles above Donelson, toward Nashville, and on the 27th went himself to Nashville to meet and confer with General Buell, but returned to Donelson the next day. Meantime, General Halleck at St. Louis
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