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Claiborne Jackson (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ll be sent you as soon as possible, to move your column up the Tennessee River. The main object of this expedition will be to destroy the railroad-bridge over Bear Creek, near Eastport, Mississippi; and also the railroad connections at Corinth, Jackson, and Humboldt. It is thought best that these objects be attempted in the order named. Strong detachments of cavalry and light artillery, supported by infantry, may by rapid movements reach these points from the river, without any serious opposer. General C. F. Smith or some very discreet officer should be selected for such commands. Having accomplished these objects, or such of them as may be practicable, you will return to Danville, and move on Paris. Perhaps the troops sent to Jackson and Humboldt can reach Paris by land as easily as to return to the transports. This must depend on the character of the roads and the position of the enemy. All telegraphic lines which can be reached must be cut. The gunboats will accompany th
ere in safe and comfortable shelter. To Major Taylor, chief of artillery, I feel under deep obligations, for his good sense and judgment in managing the batteries, on which so much depended. I inclose his report and indorse his recommendations. The cavalry of my command kept to the rear, and took little part in the action; but it would have been madness to have exposed horses to the musketry-fire under which we were compelled to remain from Sunday at 8 A. M. till Monday at 4 P. M. Captain Kossack, of the engineers, was with me all the time, and was of great assistance. I inclose his sketch of the battle-field, which is the best I have seen, and which will enable you to see the various positions occupied by my division, as well as of the others that participated in the battle. I will also send in, during the day, the detailed reports of my brigadiers and colonels, and will indorse them with such remarks as I deem proper. I am, with much respect, your obedient servant, W. T.
rd Ohio, Colonel Appler; and the Fifty-seventh Ohio, Colonel Mungen, on the left of the Corinth road, its right resting on Shiloh meeting-house. Fourth Brigade, composed of the Seventy-second Ohio, Colonel Buckland; the Forty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Sullivan; and the Seventieth Ohio, Colonel Cockerill, on the right of the Corinth road, its left resting on Shiloh meeting-house. Two batteries of artillery — Taylor's and Waterhouse's — were posted, the former at Shiloh, and the latter on a ridgeeft their proper field of action. Colonel Buckland managed his brigade well. I commend him to your notice as a cool, intelligent, and judicious gentleman, needing only confidence and experience to make a good commander. His subordinates, Colonels Sullivan and Cockerill, behaved with great gallantry; the former receiving a severe wound on Sunday, and yet commanding and holding his regiment well in hand all day, and on Monday, until his right arm was broken by a shot. Colonel Cockerill held a
the same time I was organizing out of the new troops that were arriving at Paducah a division for myself when allowed to take the field, which I had been promised by General Halleek. His purpose was evidently to operate up the Tennessee River, to break up Bear Creek Bridge and the railroad communications between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, and no doubt lie was provoked that Generals Grant and Smith had turned aside to Nashville. In the mean time several of the gunboats, under Captain Phelps, United States Navy, had gone up the Tennessee as far as Florence, and on their return had reported a strong Union feeling among the people along the river. On the 10th of March, having received the necessary orders from General Halleck, I embarked my division at Paducah. It was composed of four brigades. The First, commanded by Colonel S. G. Hicks, was composed of the Fortieth Illinois, Forty-sixth Ohio, and Morton's Indiana Battery, on the boats Sallie List, Golden Gate, J. B. Adams
familiar with all the ground inside and outside my lines. My personal staff was composed of Captain J. H. Hammond, assistant adjutant-general; Surgeons Hartshorn and L'Hommedieu; Lieutenant Colonels Hascall and Sanger, inspector-generals; Lieutenants McCoy and John Taylor, aides-de-camp. We were all conscious that the enemy was collecting at Corinth, but in what force we could not know, nor did we know what was going on behind us. On the 17th of March, General U. S. Grant was restored to theand attack. I recommend him to your notice. Major Sanger's intelligence, quick perception, and rapid execution, were of very great value to me, especially in bringing into line the batteries that cooperated so efficiently in our movements. Captains McCoy and Dayton, aides-de-camp, were with me all the time, carrying orders, and acting with coolness, spirit, and courage. To Surgeon Hartshorne and Dr. L'Hommedieu hundreds of wounded men are indebted for the kind and excellent treatment receive
oh meeting-house. Fourth Brigade, composed of the Seventy-second Ohio, Colonel Buckland; the Forty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Sullivan; and the Seventieth Ohio, Colonel Cockerill, on the right of the Corinth road, its left resting on Shiloh meeting-house. Two batteries of artillery — Taylor's and Waterhouse's — were posted, the fornotice as a cool, intelligent, and judicious gentleman, needing only confidence and experience to make a good commander. His subordinates, Colonels Sullivan and Cockerill, behaved with great gallantry; the former receiving a severe wound on Sunday, and yet commanding and holding his regiment well in hand all day, and on Monday, until his right arm was broken by a shot. Colonel Cockerill held a larger proportion of his men than any colonel in my division, and was with me from first to last. Colonel J. A. McDowell, commanding the first brigade, held his ground on Sunday, till I ordered him to fall back, which he did in line of battle; and when ordered, he
me into the Hamburg Road. Within a few days, Prentiss's division arrived and camped on my left, andff-officers to notify Generals McClernand and Prentiss of the coming blow. Indeed, McClernand had aernand, asking him to support my left; to General Prentiss, giving him notice that the enemy was in to General Hurlbut, asking him to support General Prentiss. At that time--7 A. M.--my division was o our left, and directing their course on General Prentiss. I saw at once that the enemy designed t flank, and fall upon Generals McClernand and Prentiss, whose line of camps was almost parallel with of artillery and musketry announced that General Prentiss was engaged; and about 9 A. M. I judged t, as the enemy interposed between him and General Prentiss early in the day. Colonel Stuart was wounas left of Hurlbut's, W. H. L. Wallace's, and Prentiss's divisions, we ought to have eighteen thousail 6, 1862, the five divisions of McClernand, Prentiss, Hurlbut, W. H. L. Wallace, and Sherman, aggr
u to be on the Tennessee. I am sending all the transports I can find for you, reporting to General Sherman for orders to go up the Cumberland for you, or, if you march across to Fort Henry, then to e. Let me hope that it will meet your approbation. The order for debarkation came while General Sherman was absent with three brigades, and no men are left to move the effects of these brigades. ation of boats. Colonel McArthur has arrived, and is now cutting a landing for himself. General Sherman will return this evening. I am obliged to transgress, and write myself in the mean time, afloat as possible. Yours, etc., W. T. Sherman, Brigadier-General commanding. headquarters Sherman's division, camp Shiloh, near Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, April 2, 1862. Captain J . A. Rawling of April 6, 1862, the five divisions of McClernand, Prentiss, Hurlbut, W. H. L. Wallace, and Sherman, aggregated about thirty-two thousand men. We had no intrenchments of any sort, on the theory t
camp; after reconnoissance, I ordered the two advance companies of the Ohio Seventy-seventh, Colonel Hildebrand, to deploy forward as skirmishers, and the regiment itself forward into line, with an interval of one hundred yards. In this order we advanced cautiously until the skirmishers were engaged. Taking it for granted this disposition would clear the camp, I held Colonel Dickey's Fourth Illinois Cavalry ready for the charge. The enemy's cavalry came down boldly at a charge, led by General Forrest in person, breaking through our line of skirmishers; when the regiment of infantry, without cause, broke, threw away their muskets, and fled. The ground was admirably adapted for a defense of infantry against cavalry, being miry and covered with fallen timber. As the regiment of infantry broke, Dickey's Cavalry began to discharge their carbines, and fell into disorder. I instantly sent orders to the rear for the brigade to form line of battle, which was promptly executed. The brok
mportance. On the 21st General Grant sent General Smith with his division to Clarksville, fifty mi sent with expeditions from the river. General C. F. Smith or some very discreet officer should be will send no more forces to Clarksville. General Smith's division will come to Fort Henry, or a pth, I learn you were at Fort Donelson, and General Smith at Nashville, from which I infer you couldneral U. S. Grant: You will place Major-General C. F. Smith in command of expedition, and remaindoubt lie was provoked that Generals Grant and Smith had turned aside to Nashville. In the mean tid order. There I reported in person to General C. F. Smith, and by him was ordered a few miles abo Railroad, between Tuscumbia and Corinth. General Smith was quite unwell, and was suffering from hrs. Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson, of General C. F. Smith's, or rather General Halleck's, staff, avannah or Crump's Landing to Purdy. General C. F. Smith remained back at Savannah, in chief com[7 more...]
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