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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
Doc. 103.-the battle of Winchester, Va. Official report of Gen. Shields. headquarters Shields' division, Winchester, Va., March 29, 1862. To Major-General Banks: sir: I have the honor to report that during my reconnaissance of the eighteenth and nine-teenth instant, in the direction of Mount Jackson, I ascertained that the enemy under Jackson was strongly posted near that place, and in direct communication with a force at Luray and another at Washington. It became important, therefore, to draw him from his position and supporting force if possible. To endeavor to effect this, I fell back to Winchester on the twentieth, giving the movement all the appearance of a retreat. The last brigade of the First division of Banks' corps d'armee, Gen. Williams commanding, took its departure for Centreville by way of Berryville, on the morning of the twenty-second, leaving only Shields' division and the Michigan cavalry in Winchester. Ashby's cavalry, observing this movement from
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
the roar of battle, drove the enemy from their shelter, and through the woods, with a fire as destructive as ever fell upon a retreating foe. The rebels fought desperately, as their piles of dead attest, and, to their chagrin and mortification, Jackson's invincible stonewall brigade and the accompanying brigades were obliged to fall back upon their reserve in disorder. Here they took up a new position, and attempted to retrieve the fortunes of the day. But again rained down upon them the samet a large proportion of the officers and men engaged in this fight were raw troops, having never before heard the screaming of shells, the whistling of bullets, or met an enemy in deadly conflict, and that they were opposed to that stone wall of Jackson's, which has never before turned their backs upon the Union army in battle. The officers of Gen. Shields' staff are entitled to the gratitude of their countrymen for the fidelity with which they discharged the trying duties that devolved upon
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
officers of inferior grade. A large proportion of the Augusta militia went to join Jackson this day week, and the residue, who required a few days to make their preparations, are rapidly assembling to leave, this afternoon. As I write, the spirit-stirring drum and ear-piercing fife are calling them to their rendezvous. They are a noble set of man, and will give a good account of themselves. When they reach their destination Augusta will have in the field three regiments, besides Imboden's and Walter's batteries, and Patrick's and Sterrett's companies of cavalry. All the troops engaged in the battle near Winchester were, I believe, from Virginia, except a company or two from Maryland. I do not know all the regiments engaged. They were nine in number, but reduced to skeletons by furloughs. Among them were Allen's, Harman's, Fulkerson's, Patton's, Echols', Cummin's, Burke's, and Preston's, (now Moore's.) Allen's, Fulkerson's, Burke's, and Echols', I belive, suffered most.
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
Gen. Jackson expressed the opinion that they were a band of heroes. The Fifth Virginia regiment was held in reserve, and did not participate actively in the earlier part of the fight, but was called in to perform the perilous task of covering the retreat. This duty it performed nobly, losing many of its gallant members, but dealing death and destruction upon the enemy, who were kept at bay. We lost two guns in the battle--one from the Rockbridge and one from the Augusta battery. The Rockbridge gun was struck by a cannon-ball and disabled. The loss of the other was caused by the killing of one of the horses, which frightened the others, and caused them to turn suddenly and capsize the carriage. The enemy were close upon us, and left no time to replace it. Our men, however, cut out and secured all the horses but one, and he was cut out by the enemy, and escaped from them, and came galloping to our camp. It would seem as if even the horses were infected with the spirit of rebell
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
covering all the approaches to the town by Cedar Creek, Front Royal, Berryville, and Romney roads. This brigade and Broadheaurnpike road leading to Strasburg in the centre, and the Front Royal road on the east. There is a little village called Kerng from the Cedar Creek road to a little ravine, near the Front Royal road, a distance of about two miles. This ground had beehird a reenforcement from Luray of five thousand reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reenforcement was bw my command, (which was stationed on picket duty on the Front Royal and Cedar Creek road,) and to report to you at the toll-ley Turnpike leading to Strasburg in the centre, and the Front Royal road on the east. On the Valley Turnpike, about threem the Cedar Creek road on his left, to a ravine near the Front Royal road on his right. The enemy had so skilfully selected a reenforcement of five thousand men from Luray reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reinforcement was b
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
the rebel side, we slept on our arms until daylight, when I proceeded to join you on the advance toward Strasburg in pursuit of the enemy, and have arrived at this camp, after sharing the honors of being in the advance with your brigade, and driving the enemy beyond this place a distance of twenty-two miles. Before closing this report, I must refer to the officers and men of the Thirteenth regiment. All alike acted nobly and fought bravely, adding new laurels to those already won in Western Virginia. Lest I should be thought to prefer one above another, I forbear making any personal mention, as they, all, both officers and men, fought with a coolness and desperation that proved them not inferior to our brave Hoosiers who are battling in other localities for our holy cause. The medical staff, and more particularly of our own Assistant Surgeon, require of me a mention. Dr. Gall, principal, having been detailed during the early part of the action to take charge of the wounded, wh
Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
, 1862. To Major-General Banks: sir: I have the honor to report that during my reconnaissance of the eighteenth and nine-teenth instant, in the direction of Mount Jackson, I ascertained that the enemy under Jackson was strongly posted near that place, and in direct communication with a force at Luray and another at Washington. this war; and yet such were their gallantry and high state of discipline, that at no time during the battle or pursuit did they give way to panic. They fled to Mt. Jackson, and are by this time no doubt in communication with the main body of the rebel army. I hope to be able in a few days to ride in a buggy, and place myself at td concise history of the late terrible battle of Winchester. On the eighteenth and nineteenth ultimo, Gen. Shields made a reconnaissance in the direction of Mount Jackson, and there ascertained that the enemy under Jackson was strongly posted near that place, and in communication with a large force at Luray and Washington. He d
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
elve hours later, after nearly all had passed the river, the remnant might have been sadly exposed to attack from Jackson, having no means of escape and no means for being reenforced. It is rumored among secessionists that this attack of Jackson was to prevent the reenforcement of Gen. McClellan by Gen. Banks's column. If so, he has probably succeeded, for it certainly cannot be spared at once from this vicinity. It seems more probable that, supposing more of our division to have gone to Fairfax, he made this dash expecting to capture some prisoners and force the few remaining to wage an unsuccessful battle with him. On Saturday our forces had started upon the Alexandria turnpike, and nearly half of them had reached the Shenandoah, when very heavy and continued firing was heard in the direction of Strasburg. Little attention was paid to it, however, and nothing was known either of the skirmishing on Saturday, or of the battle on the following Sunday, until too late to return an
Berryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
appearance of a retreat. The last brigade of the First division of Banks' corps d'armee, Gen. Williams commanding, took its departure for Centreville by way of Berryville, on the morning of the twenty-second, leaving only Shields' division and the Michigan cavalry in Winchester. Ashby's cavalry, observing this movement from a dillivan's brigade was posted in the rear of Kimball's, and within supporting distance of it, covering all the approaches to the town by Cedar Creek, Front Royal, Berryville, and Romney roads. This brigade and Broadhead's cavalry were held in reserve, so as to support our force in front at any point where it might be attacked. Thesement all the appearance of a hasty retreat. The last brigade of the First division of Gen. Banks's corps d'armee left Winchester for Centreville by the way of Berryville, on the morning of the twenty-second, leaving only Shields' division and the Michigan cavalry. The enemy's scouts, observing this movement, signaled Jackson,
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 106
of the twenty-third a reenforcement from Luray of five thousand reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reenforcement was being followed by another body of ten thousand from Sperryville; but recent rains having rendered the Shenandoah River impassable, they found themselves compelled to fall back without being able to effect the proposed junction. At daylight on the morning of the twenty-fourth, our artillery again opened on the enemy. He entered upon his retreat in very goodthe twenty-third a reenforcement of five thousand men from Luray reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reinforcement was being followed by another body of ten thousand from Sperryville, but recent rains having rendered the Shenandoah River impassable, they were compelled to fall back without effecting the proposed junction. At daylight on the twenty-fourth our artillery again opened upon the enemy. He entered upon his retreat in good order, considering what he had suffered
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