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Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
official order. Headquarters P. M., Harrisburgh, April 4, 1862. General order, No. 20. The Governor congratulates the members of the Eighty-fourth and One hundred and tenth regiments Pennsylvania Volunteers upon their gallantry in the recent severe and brilliant action at Winchester. Their bearing upon that occasion, under the formidable attack of a bold and desperate foe, was worthy of the high reputation already won by the soldiers of Pennsylvania on the memorable fields of Dranesville, Roanoke Island, and Newbern. The Governor is proud to recognise the enviable distinction thus gained by the troops of the commonwealth, and trusts that to the end of the present wicked rebellion they may be distinguished by similar deeds of valor and endurance, and that, whenever called to meet the enemies of their country, they may prove their fitness to sustain its flag. The example of the gallant Colonel Murray, of the Eighty-fourth, who fell at the head of his regiment in the con
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
rting distance of it, covering all the approaches to the town by Cedar Creek, Front Royal, Berryville, and Romney roads. This brigade and Broster is approached from the south by three principal roads — the Cedar Creek road on the west, the Valley Turnpike road leading to Strasburg about half a mile beyond Kernstown, his line extending from the Cedar Creek road to a little ravine, near the Front Royal road, a distance omand, (which was stationed on picket duty on the Front Royal and Cedar Creek road,) and to report to you at the toll-gate on the Strasburg pid is bounded on its extreme right by another mud road leading to Cedar Creek. The country to the left (west) of the turnpike is flat and comd. Gen. Tyler moved his column by the right flank as far as the Cedar Creek road, rested his right upon the same, and the left upon the befole beyond Kernstown, his line extending about two miles from the Cedar Creek road on his left, to a ravine near the Front Royal road on his r
Sperryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
intentions of our crafty antagonist. On the morning of the twenty-third a reenforcement from Luray of five thousand reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reenforcement was being followed by another body of ten thousand from Sperryville; but recent rains having rendered the Shenandoah River impassable, they found themselves compelled to fall back without being able to effect the proposed junction. At daylight on the morning of the twenty-fourth, our artillery again opened onons of his crafty antagonist, for on the morning of the twenty-third a reenforcement of five thousand men from Luray reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reinforcement was being followed by another body of ten thousand from Sperryville, but recent rains having rendered the Shenandoah River impassable, they were compelled to fall back without effecting the proposed junction. At daylight on the twenty-fourth our artillery again opened upon the enemy. He entered upon his re
Woodstock, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
uit of the enemy. The pursuit was kept up with vigor, energy and activity, until they reached Woodstock, where the enemy's retreat became flight, and the pursuit was abandoned because of the utter enued the pursuit, pressing them with vigor and with repeated and destructive attacks as far as Woodstock, where we halted from mere exhaustion. The enemy's sufferings have been terrible, and such are for other victories. (Signed) Brig.-General Shields. headquarters Shields' division, Woodstock, Va., April 12, 1862. General order, No. 19. The General commanding the division directs thes in pursuit of the enemy in person. The pursuit was kept up with vigor until they reached Woodstock, where the enemy's retreat became fright, and the pursuit was abandoned, because of the utter Thompson, Quartermaster. Henry Bryant, Acting Medical Director. Our troops are now beyond Woodstock, where they are stopped for the present by the burning of a bridge by the rebels. This will b
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
nd, leading the right wing, appeared most conspicuously throughout the battle. There were also engaged four and a half batteries of artillery, commanded by Lieut.-Col. P. Daum, and sixteen companies of cavalry, commanded by Col. Broadhead, of Michigan. Our pickets, whom the cavalry of the enemy had annoyed so much in the morning, were of the Eighth Ohio, and the remainder of their regiment was the first to come to their assistance, who engaged in a promiscuous fight with the enemy until the iments of infantry, twenty-six pieces of artillery, and Ashby's cavalry, a magnificent regiment, and vastly superior to our own it must be acknowledged. Of these forces two hundred prisoners were taken, seized near the enemy's right wing by our Michigan cavalry, under Col. Broadhead. Ambulances were bringing in the wounded all the night and day, and of the enemy, those who were not taken off the field amounted to one hundred and fifty wounded. Not less than three hundred of the enemy were kill
New Market (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
ost obedient, humble servant, R. C. Shriber. Gen. Shields' account of the battle. The following letter from Gen. Shields, to a friend in Washington, gives the General's informal account of the battle of Winchester: headquarters General Shields' division, Winchester, Va., March 26, 1862. I will give you a brief account of our late operations. My reconnaissance beyond Strasburg, on the eighteenth and nineteenth inst., discovered Jackson reinforced in a strong position, near New-Market, within supporting distance of the main body of the rebels under Johnston. It was necessary to decoy him from that position. Therefore I fell back rapidly to Winchester on the twentieth, as if in retreat, marching my whole command nearly thirty miles in one day. My force was placed at night in a secluded position, two miles from Winchester, on the Martinsburg road. On the twenty-first the rebel cavalry, under Ashby, showed themselves to our pickets, within sight of Winchester. On the
Snickersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
doned, the forces withdrawn to Winchester, and Jackson left to pursue his course down the valley of Virginia. This task having been fully accomplished, as we supposed, the whole column was being removed to Fairfax Court-House, upon the turnpike which leads directly from this place to Alexandria, and the greater part of the Fifth corps d'armee was on its way, some having proceeded upon the march across the Shenandoah over the pontoon which had been constructed, as far as the village of Snickersville, a distance of nineteen miles from Winchester, and four miles beyond the river. Of those which had not crossed, a large number were encamped on this side, and nearly the whole force had withdrawn or were preparing to do so. In such a condition, and with such preparations, did Jackson make this bold and unexpected onset, which resulted disastrously to his command, and conferred additional testimony to the intrepidity and coolness of our soldiers. The military bridge across the Shen
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
He entered upon his retreat in very good order, considering what he had suffered. Gen. Banks, hearing of our engagement on his way to Washington, halted at Harper's Ferry, and with remarkable promptitude and sagacity ordered back Williams's whole division, so that my express found the rear brigade already en route to join us. Tnaged to carry off their artillery in the darkness. We opened upon them by early light next morning, and they commenced to retreat. Gen. Banks returned from Harper's Ferry between nine and ten o'clock A. M., and placed himself, at my request, at the head of the command, ten miles from the battle-field, pursuing the enemy. Reinfnemy. He entered upon his retreat in good order, considering what he had suffered. Gen. Banks, hearing of the engagement on his way to Washington, halted at Harper's Ferry, and ordered back a part of Williams's division. Gen. Banks himself returned, and after making a hasty visit to Gen. Shields, who was confined to his bed wit
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
The cavalry captured two hundred and thirty-nine prisoners, and met only with little resistance from the enemy's cavalry. At eight P. M. the musketry ceased. A few more cannon-shots from their extreme left were fired, so as to withdraw our attention from the retreating foe, and all was over. Our men remained on the field of battle picking up the wounded, and slept upon their arms, and awoke for the pursuit of the enemy on the morning of the twenty-fourth, who fell rapidly back beyond Newton, when at nine o'clock of the morning of that day Major-Gen. Banks took command, and I reported back to you. General, I have the honor to be ever ready to serve in so glorious a body of soldiers, under your able leading. Your most obedient, humble servant, R. C. Shriber. Gen. Shields' account of the battle. The following letter from Gen. Shields, to a friend in Washington, gives the General's informal account of the battle of Winchester: headquarters General Shields' divis
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
task of covering the retreat. This duty it performed nobly, losing many of its gallant members, but dealing death and destruction upon the enemy, who were kept at bay. We lost two guns in the battle--one from the Rockbridge and one from the Augusta battery. The Rockbridge gun was struck by a cannon-ball and disabled. The loss of the other was caused by the killing of one of the horses, which frightened the others, and caused them to turn suddenly and capsize the carriage. The enemy werey assembling to leave, this afternoon. As I write, the spirit-stirring drum and ear-piercing fife are calling them to their rendezvous. They are a noble set of man, and will give a good account of themselves. When they reach their destination Augusta will have in the field three regiments, besides Imboden's and Walter's batteries, and Patrick's and Sterrett's companies of cavalry. All the troops engaged in the battle near Winchester were, I believe, from Virginia, except a company or two
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