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Monroe County, Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
but the following is the fullest list I can yet make out: killed. Lieut.-Col Clough, of Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, of Clarksville Capt. May, of Memphis; Capt. Porter of Nashville. Fourteenth Mississippi regiment. Judge Rogers, Monroe County, Mississippi; Sergeant John Clark, R. M. Bell, J. Q. Wall, George James. wounded. Major Hewitt, Second Kentucky regiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, of Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; Capt. Gholson, Fourteenth Missisown, but from several sources I have made the following brief list: Killed.--Lieut.-Col. Clough, Texas; Lieut.-Col. Robb, Clarksville, Tenn.; Capt. May, Memphis; Capt. Porter, Nashville. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment.--Judge Rogers, Monroe Co., Miss.; Sergt. Jno. Clark, Sergt. John Montgomery, R. M. Bell, J. G. Watt, George James. Wounded.--Major Hewitt, Second Kentucky regiment, (since reported dead;) Capt. Many, Nashville; Capt. Crigier, Fourteenth Mississippi; Capt. Gholson, Fourt
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
You have continually led the way in the Valley of the Lower Mississippi, the Tennessee and the Cumberland. You have carried command commanders of brigades, Col. Baldwin, commanding Mississippi and Tennessee troops, and Col. Wharton and Col. McCanslad the Forrest Rangers, under command of Col. Forrest, of Mississippi, was sent out as a scouting party, met the enemy in consosed of the men of Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama, confronted by an army of at least fifty thonts engaged in it being Floyd's brigade and several from Mississippi and Tennessee. It was in one of these charges that Li Johnson. Most of the regiments were from Tennessee and Mississippi, but Virginia, Alabama, Texas, and Arkansas also contribe confined to the out-posts and pickets. A battalion of Mississippi cavalry, under command of Col. Forrest, that day encount0 15thArk.Gee,------270717 27thAla.Hughes,------21601 1stMiss.Simonton,Lt.-Col. Hamilton2801776 3ddo.Davidson,Lt.-Col. We
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
manity remained. The same boat also received a shot near the water-line, which, while it did not penetrate the hull, started the timbers so as to set her leaking badly. During the night, however, all damage was repaired, and this morning she is as ready for active service as ever. The total loss on the Louisville was six killed and eight or ten wounded. One of the other gunboats had some of her woodwork shot shot away, but was not materially damaged. The iron boats in action were: Louisville, Capt. B. M. Dove. St. Louis, Lieut.-Com. Paulding. Carondelet, Lieut.-Com. Kelte. Mound City, Lieut.-Com.-----. The other three boats were the wooden ones — Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga. There is a boat about to leave for Cairo, and I have concluded to mail this without awaiting the result of the final assault. Affairs look encouraging — the Fort is completely invested, and will probably be stormed either this afternoon or tomorrow morning. The rebels have a flag flyin
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
o be a desperate fight against a foe very many times their superior in numbers. I cannot particularize instances of heroic daring performed by both officers and men, but must content myself for the present by saying, in my judgment, they all deserve well of the country. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, John B. Floyd, Brigadier-General Commanding. Official: John Withers, A. A. Gen. A. & I. G. O., March 10, 1862. General Pillow's report. Columbia, Tennessee, February 18, 1862. Captain Clarence Derrick, A. A. General: On the eighteenth instant, General A. S. Johnston ordered me to proceed to Fort Donelson and take command at that post. On the nineteenth instant, I arrived at that place. In detailing the operations of the forces under my command at Fort Donelson, it is proper to state the condition of that work and of the forces constituting its garrison. When I arrived, I found the work on the river battery unfinished, and entirely
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
dead lay piled up in heaps, their gore trickling in red lines along the snow in every direction. Still our troops fought on, contesting inch by inch the ground they were compelled to vacate. At nightfall the firing ceased, and at twelve o'clock Pillow telegraphed to Nashville: The day is ours; we have repulsed the enemy with great loss to them, and with considerable loss to ourselves. We want reenforcenmnts. Reenforcements were not forthcoming, however, and Sunday morning found the Union armand fresh men, encompassing the place and completely surrounding our forces. The fight was renewed at five o'clock A. M.; but it being useless to contend against such odds, the Fort and army capitulated to the enemy on their own terms. Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner fought like heroes. They were everywhere, animating their men, constantly under fire, and encouraging them by their example and presence. As the regiments moved on to the charge, Floyd would rise in his stirrups and shout: Be stead
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
r the whole fleet started, and by ten o'clock we had reached Smithland, at the mouth of the Cumberland River. The scene here was magnificent beyond description — the night was as warm as an evening iibraltar, but its strength is weakness when compared to that of Donelson. Along Dover, the Cumberland River runs nearly north. A half-mile or so below it makes a short bend to the west for some hundriefly interrupt the narrative here to say that Fort Donelson is located on the bank of the Cumberland River, but of the character or strength of the work my informant knows nothing beyond the fact ths army completely surrounded our own in the shape of a crescent, whose either end rested on Cumberland River, to the right and left of Fort Donelson. Through this line a part of our troops may have ceaders of the Dispatch as the first news from a Southern source. Fort Donelson is on the Cumberland River, two miles from the town of Dover. The surrounding country is a succession of hills, heavi
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
, Third division, Department West-Tennessee, Fort Henry, February 18, 1862. To Capt Fred. Knefler, A Regiment Kentucky Volunteers. [B.] Fort Henry, February 18, 1862. Colonel: On the morninoon of the eleventh inst., while in camp at Fort Henry, I received orders from Gen. McClernand to pansport steamers; the column which came from Fort Henry, across the country, under Gen. Grant in perments of this force. The land forces left Fort Henry at ten o'clock Wednesday morning. The route ing Fort Donelson, is its immense strength. Fort Henry was thought to be almost a Gibraltar, but itednesday was quietly consumed in moving from Fort Henry, and getting into position before the rebelss: headquarters District of Cairo, Fort Henry, Tenn., Feb. 11, 1862. General field orders,e two brigades of the second division now at Fort Henry will follow as rapidly as practicable, by thr exceeding in fierceness the bombardment of Fort Henry. At all events, the effect upon the boats w[23 more...]
James Cooper (search for this): chapter 48
illiam Drummond, slightly. Company D.--Killed, Sergeant Nathan W. Doty; Private G. Weeks. Wounded, First Lieut. E. F. Ensign, severely; Second Lieut. G. L. Godfrey, slightly; Corporal Wm. Reagan, severely; Privates W. A. Brenton, severely; Casper S. Brady, severely; John W. Coombs, severely; Peter Dresser, slightly; J. H. Hodyn, slightly; Henry Lawrence, slightly; Andrew Slater, leg; Thomas Ward, arm; J. G. Williams, arm; David Yant, arm; William Cady, slightly; P. G. Noel, slightly; J. Cooper, slightly; J. Gordionier, slightly. Company E.--Killed, none. Wounded, Sergeant Amos Wymer, slightly; Color-Corporal John Robinson; Privates G. W. Morehouse, slightly; M. Page, severely; R. Coop, slightly; Sam. Daugherty, slightly; Robert Sloan, slightly; Robert Ready, slightly. Company F.--Killed, Second Lieut. William C. Harper; Sergeant G. W. Morse; Privates W S. Crooks, F. G. Mets, G. B. Shuver, W. W. Vinson, John Vandorn. Wounded, Corporals Samuel Hoofman, groin; James Spr
James Carr (search for this): chapter 48
W. Morehouse, slightly; M. Page, severely; R. Coop, slightly; Sam. Daugherty, slightly; Robert Sloan, slightly; Robert Ready, slightly. Company F.--Killed, Second Lieut. William C. Harper; Sergeant G. W. Morse; Privates W S. Crooks, F. G. Mets, G. B. Shuver, W. W. Vinson, John Vandorn. Wounded, Corporals Samuel Hoofman, groin; James Sprague, neck; Privates F. M. Armstrong, groin; Alonzo Bradford, thigh; Chas. S. Coger, arm; J. H. Duffield, shoulder and neck; H. D. Duffield, slightly; James Carr, slightly; Ed. Goddard, arm; H. C. Hawk, thigh; John S. Marriott, shoulder and arm; John Morrow, slightly; Geo. Smith, slightly; Andrew Shrives, head; F. B. Wilson, head and hip; William W. Walker, slightly. Company G.--Killed, Sergeant John Dunn; Privates J. M. Duckworth, A. J. Patterson, A. G. Niduy, J. A. Rhodes, William A. Drake. Wounded, First Lieut. J. B. Weaver, slightly; First Sergeant P. L. Stoner, severely; Corporals A. G. Johnson, severely; John Jones, severely; J. A. DeS
W. A. Brenton (search for this): chapter 48
er, slightly; W. H. Ralston, severely; W. H. Megill, severely; James Hunter, severely; Charles Flurry, slightly; Wm. McLain, slightly; A. J. Pass, slightly; J. W. Morrison, severely; G. A. Bell, slightly; W. C. Hecker, slightly; A. F. Gore, slightly; Fred. Herbert, slightly; William Drummond, slightly. Company D.--Killed, Sergeant Nathan W. Doty; Private G. Weeks. Wounded, First Lieut. E. F. Ensign, severely; Second Lieut. G. L. Godfrey, slightly; Corporal Wm. Reagan, severely; Privates W. A. Brenton, severely; Casper S. Brady, severely; John W. Coombs, severely; Peter Dresser, slightly; J. H. Hodyn, slightly; Henry Lawrence, slightly; Andrew Slater, leg; Thomas Ward, arm; J. G. Williams, arm; David Yant, arm; William Cady, slightly; P. G. Noel, slightly; J. Cooper, slightly; J. Gordionier, slightly. Company E.--Killed, none. Wounded, Sergeant Amos Wymer, slightly; Color-Corporal John Robinson; Privates G. W. Morehouse, slightly; M. Page, severely; R. Coop, slightly; Sam. D
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