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ice. Col. J. W. Bissell, engineer regiment, rendered me most valuable service, both before and during the bombardment of the place. He conducted the erection of the heavy batteries, and remained in them until the enemy evacuated the place. Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery, has distinguished himself throughout the operations. My personal staff, Major Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General, Major C. A. Morgan, and Capt. L. H. Marshall, Aids-de-Camp, and Major Corse, Inspector-General, were prot and efficient in conveying my orders under fire of the enemy. I transmit, enclosed, the reports of division and brigade commanders immediately concerned in the final operations, as also of Capt. Mower, commanding in the batteries, and of Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery. Col. J. W. Bissell, Engineers, has been too incessantly occupied to make a written report, but desires to mention the following officers of this regiment who displayed unusual gallantry: Lieut.-Col. Adams, Captains Dea
A. H. Foote (search for this): chapter 96
more damage than they had us. We had knocked over three of their heaviest guns and one small one, shot through the boiler of one of their boats, and played smash with them generally. Of their number of killed we do not know correctly, and I will not guess. There were many fresh graves; we found two unburied, and a grave begun and spades and picks left, it unfinished. And so ends the battle of New-Madrid. We control the river, and no guns or stores leave Island No.10 for Dixie. Tell Com. Foote to send them along this way. There are large supplies at No. Ten. Neither men nor supplies will reach Dixie until the war closes. A large transport hove in sight this morning from Island No.10, but, seeing the Stars and Stripes and the guns ready to work, wisely turned about, and landed above and on the opposite side, and I suppose her troops are skedaddling through the Kentucky woods for better society. Com. Hollins commanded the rebel gunboats. Gens. Stuart and McGown commanded
J. P. McCown (search for this): chapter 96
n-boats. The fleet was commanded by Commodore Hollins, the land-forces by Generals McCown, Stewart, and Gantt. On the eleventh the siege-guns were delivered to Colrch 17, 1862. Captain: I transmit the enclosed correspondence between Major-General McCown, commanding confederate forces, and myself, for the information of the Gommissioned to propose measures for their relief. Your obedient servant, J. P. Mccown, Major-General Commanding Confederate Forces. headquarters New-Madrid; MarBrigadier-General Commanding. New-Madrid, March 17, 1862. At my request General McCown allowed me to take the present step for the purpose of removing some of ourrid Bend is the same port as Island No.10. Sanford P. Yandall, Jr., Medical Director Gen. McCown's Division, C. S.A. headquarters United States forces, New-Madrid, lly, your obedient servant, John Pope, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major-General J. P. McCown, Commanding C. S.A., etc. Col. J. Kirby Smith's report. head
William Hill (search for this): chapter 96
d efficient in conveying my orders under fire of the enemy. I transmit, enclosed, the reports of division and brigade commanders immediately concerned in the final operations, as also of Capt. Mower, commanding in the batteries, and of Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery. Col. J. W. Bissell, Engineers, has been too incessantly occupied to make a written report, but desires to mention the following officers of this regiment who displayed unusual gallantry: Lieut.-Col. Adams, Captains Dean, Hill, and Tweeddale, and Lieuts. Odenbaugh, Randolph, and Besier. Our whole loss during the operation was fifty-one killed and wounded. A detailed list will be transmitted as soon as it can be made. The enemy's loss cannot be ascertained. A number of his dead were left unburied, and over a hundred new graves attested that he must have suffered severely. I am, General, respectfully, Your obedient servant, John Pope, Brigadier-General Commanding. Brig.-Gen. G. W. Cullum, Chief of Staff a
William McGann (search for this): chapter 96
able length, and my time is exhausted, so I must reserve them for a future letter. I append the list of killed and wounded so far as I have been able to obtain them. The list is correct so far as it goes, and I believe it is about full. Telemaque. killed.--Capt. Carr, Tenth Illinois; privates Lewis Nine, company B, Thirty-ninth Ohio; Peter Ward, company F, Twenty-seventh Ohio; Wm. Peacock, company A, First United States infantry; John Johnson, company A, First United States infantry; Wm. McGann, company A, First United States infantry; Timothy Nelligan, company A, First United States infantry. wounded.--Corporal Chas. Laney, company A, First United States infantry; privates Michael Clark, company A, First United States infantry; Wm. Jahr, company A. First United States infantry; Wm. Van Horn, company G, Thirty-ninth Ohio; Joseph Adams, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; John Clark, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; Joseph Estell, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; W. J. Breed, company
C. A. Morgan (search for this): chapter 96
irty-four hours after they were received at Cairo. One brigade, consisting of the Tenth and Sixteenth Illinois, under Col. Morgan, of the Tenth, was detailed to cover the construction of the battery, and to work in the trenches. They were supported H of his regiment, was placed in charge of the siege-guns. The enemy's pickets and grand guards were driven in by Col. Morgan, from the ground selected for the battery, without firing a shot, although the enemy fired several volleys of musketryly concerned in the final operations against the place. The Tenth and Sixteenth Illinois, commanded respectively by Cols. Morgan and J. R. Smith, were detailed as guards to the proposed trenches and to aid in constructing them. They marched from as distinguished himself throughout the operations. My personal staff, Major Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General, Major C. A. Morgan, and Capt. L. H. Marshall, Aids-de-Camp, and Major Corse, Inspector-General, were prompt and efficient in conveying
bove the knee. W. J. Breed, Co. I, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. Isaac A. Davis, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. John Friend, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation below the knee; quite restless, shock great; will, I think, recover. Jos. Pearce, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation above the knee; very restless to-day; will recover, I think. ----Clark, Co. A, First Regular infantry, bad flesh-wounds in face, shoulder, and arm. Corporal Rosey, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, compound comminuted fracture of clavicle and scapula; serious. Wm. Peacock, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, four flesh-wounds; serious. John Johnson, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, penetrating wound of abdomen; will likely die. ----McGown, brought into the hospital dying; lived six hours after losing a teacupful of brains. Wm. John, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry. All the regulars were at the guns, and injured by the one
Doc. 93.-the capture of New-Madrid, Mo. General Pope's official report. headquarters District of the Mississippi, New-Madrid, March 14, 1862. General: I have the honor to submit, for the information of the General commanding the Department, the following report of the operations which resulted in the capture of this place. I arrived before this town with the forces under my command on Monday, the third instant. I found the place occupied by five regiments of infantry and several companies of artillery. One bastioned earthwork, mounting fourteen heavy guns, about half a mile below the town, and another irregular work at the upper end of the town, mounting seven pieces of heavy artillery, together with lines of intrenchments between them, constituted the defensive works. Six gun-boats, carrying from four to eight heavy guns each, were anchored along the shore, between the upper and lower redoubts. The country is perfectly level for miles around the place, and as t
Peter Nord (search for this): chapter 96
scomfort. I have not spoken of regimental officers nor of division and brigade commanders. I can say Ohio need be ashamed of none of them. Of the men, I have spoken not half complimentary enough. They have proved soldiers in the truest and best acceptation of the term. I will now give you as perfect a list as I can of the killed and wounded — my list of the wounded is full. The killed did not come under my observation, and will not be reported by name until to-morrow morning: Peter Nord, Co. F, Twenty-seventh Ohio, shot in both hands by a shell; died in six hours. Jos. Adams, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee; is quite comfortable to-day. John Clark, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee; doing well. Jos. Estell, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee. W. J. Breed, Co. I, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. Isaac A. Davis, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. John Frie
Isaac P. Smith (search for this): chapter 96
command that and the river above it, and opened fire at daylight, on the thirteenth, just thirty-four hours after they were received at Cairo. One brigade, consisting of the Tenth and Sixteenth Illinois, under Col. Morgan, of the Tenth, was detailed to cover the construction of the battery, and to work in the trenches. They were supported by Stanley's division, consisting of the Twenty — seventh and Thirty-ninth Ohio, under Col. Groesbeck, and the Forty-third and Sixty-third Ohio, under Col. Smith. Capt. Mower, First United States infantry, with companies A and H of his regiment, was placed in charge of the siege-guns. The enemy's pickets and grand guards were driven in by Col. Morgan, from the ground selected for the battery, without firing a shot, although the enemy fired several volleys of musketry. The work was prosecuted in silence, and with the utmost rapidity, until at three o'clock A. M., two small redoubts, connected by a curtain, and mounting the four heavy guns which
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