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ter determined, although the rebel force somewhat exceeded his own, to charge upon them; and placing himself at the head of his own and Capt. Noleman's commands, led them in a dashing charge toward the foe. As he neared them, however, the heart of Jeff. failed him, and wildly delivering one scattering volley, which went far over the heads of our men, he and his command turned tail and fled. Our cavalry closely pursued them, and there ensued a scene which has scarcely been equalled since the damall arms, our men captured six prisoners, two of whom were officers, and killed and wounded several of the enemy, besides most effectually dispersing them. It was reported afterward by prisoners taken in the fort at the time of its capture, that Jeff. entered the town at a tearing gallop, his horse almost exhausted by the race, and immediately applied to Col. Gautt, commanding the post, for two regiments of infantry and a field-battery, to go out and give battle to the audacious Federals. On
Edward A. Parrott (search for this): chapter 96
ssible, in such a position as to blockade the river, so far as transports were concerned, and to cut off supplies and reenforcements for the enemy from below. Point Pleasant, twelve miles below, was selected, as being in a rich agricultural region, and being the terminus of the plank-road from the interior of Arkansas. I accordingly threw forward Col. Plummer, Eleventh Missouri, to that point, with three regiments of infantry, three companies of cavalry, and a field-battery of ten-pound Parrott and rifled guns, with orders to make a lodgment on the river-bank, to line the bank with rifle-pits for a thousand men, and to establish his artillery in sunk batteries of single pieces between the rifle-pits. This arrangement was made to present as small a mark as possible to the shells of the gunboats, and to render futile the use of round-shot from their heavy guns. Col. Plummer marched with all speed, and after some cannonading from gunboats which he found there, succeeded in making a
John Clark (search for this): chapter 96
th Ohio, shot in both hands by a shell; died in six hours. Jos. Adams, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee; is quite comfortable to-day. John Clark, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee; doing well. Jos. Estell, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee. W. J. Breed, Co. Itless, shock great; will, I think, recover. Jos. Pearce, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation above the knee; very restless to-day; will recover, I think. ----Clark, Co. A, First Regular infantry, bad flesh-wounds in face, shoulder, and arm. Corporal Rosey, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, compound comminuted fracture oed States infantry; Wm. Jahr, company A. First United States infantry; Wm. Van Horn, company G, Thirty-ninth Ohio; Joseph Adams, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; John Clark, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; Joseph Estell, company H, Twenty-seventh Ohio; W. J. Breed, company I, Forty-third Ohio; Isaac A. Davis, company E, Forty-third
David Hunter (search for this): chapter 96
course of arduous and trying service. They were well appointed and equipped in all points, and were led by officers of experience and tried merit. The army landed at Commerce, on the twenty-fourth day of February, and on the twenty-eighth took up their line of march toward New-Madrid, where the rebels were reported to be fortified in considerable force. Up to this time no incident of importance had occurred. On the second day after leaving Commerce, however, the advance guard reached Hunter's farm, a place of some notoriety in connection with rebel operations in this section, and learned that the notorious Jeff. Thompson had just left there, having been for several days in the neigh-borhood with a force of cavalry for the purpose of watching, and if possible, obstructing the movements of our forces. On learning the approach of our troops he had, as usual, fled, and although immediate chase was given, he could not be found. On the following morning, however, two companies of
J. W. Bissell (search for this): chapter 96
ntt. On the eleventh the siege-guns were delivered to Colonel Bissell's engineer regiment, who had been sent to Cairo for thction of this place, entitle him to special notice. Col. J. W. Bissell, engineer regiment, rendered me most valuable servicbatteries, and of Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery. Col. J. W. Bissell, Engineers, has been too incessantly occupied to makn well drilled as artillerists, and behaved admirably. Col. Bissell's engineer regiment were most valuable aids. While I hts mentioned, together with the First Regular infantry and Bissell's engineers, in view of the distinguished part they took ifully with the heavy artillery of the enemy, despatched Col. Bissell, of the Engineer regiment, to Cairo, for some heavier gder his command, in an attempt to carry it by assault. Col. Bissell procured three thirty-two pound siege-guns and an eightter our troops entered the lower fort, the mechanics of Col. Bissell's regiment had extracted the spikes from nearly all, cl
Joseph Pearce (search for this): chapter 96
nth Ohio, amputation above the knee; is quite comfortable to-day. John Clark, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee; doing well. Jos. Estell, Co. H, Twenty-seventh Ohio, amputation above the knee. W. J. Breed, Co. I, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. Isaac A. Davis, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. John Friend, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation below the knee; quite restless, shock great; will, I think, recover. Jos. Pearce, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation above the knee; very restless to-day; will recover, I think. ----Clark, Co. A, First Regular infantry, bad flesh-wounds in face, shoulder, and arm. Corporal Rosey, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, compound comminuted fracture of clavicle and scapula; serious. Wm. Peacock, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, four flesh-wounds; serious. John Johnson, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, penetrating wound of abdomen; will likely die. -
George W. Cullum (search for this): chapter 96
Col. Adams, Captains Dean, Hill, and Tweeddale, and Lieuts. Odenbaugh, Randolph, and Besier. Our whole loss during the operation was fifty-one killed and wounded. A detailed list will be transmitted as soon as it can be made. The enemy's loss cannot be ascertained. A number of his dead were left unburied, and over a hundred new graves attested that he must have suffered severely. I am, General, respectfully, Your obedient servant, John Pope, Brigadier-General Commanding. Brig.-Gen. G. W. Cullum, Chief of Staff and of Engineers, Department of the Mississippi, St. Louis. Correspondence between General Pope and rebel officers. headquarters District of the Mississippi, New-Madrid, March 17, 1862. Captain: I transmit the enclosed correspondence between Major-General McCown, commanding confederate forces, and myself, for the information of the General commanding the department. Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, John Pope, Brigadier-General Commanding. Cap
David Stuart (search for this): chapter 96
tars and Stripes and the guns ready to work, wisely turned about, and landed above and on the opposite side, and I suppose her troops are skedaddling through the Kentucky woods for better society. Com. Hollins commanded the rebel gunboats. Gens. Stuart and McGown commanded the land forces. Gen. Stuart was a class-mate and roommate of Gen. Pope at West-Point, and was so impolite as to leave this morning without saying good-by. O. W. N. Cincinnati Gazette account. New-Madrid, Mo., MaGen. Stuart was a class-mate and roommate of Gen. Pope at West-Point, and was so impolite as to leave this morning without saying good-by. O. W. N. Cincinnati Gazette account. New-Madrid, Mo., March 15. On the anniversary of the birthday of George Washington, the army of the Mississippi, under command of Major-Gen. John Pope, left St. Louis to commence its momentous journey down the river. The force was a small one, compared with the vast aggregation of men composing the armies on the Potomac and of Kentucky, but it included some of the best troops in the Federal service, men originally of fine physical and moral constitution, and disciplined by a long course of arduous and trying
J. D. Webster (search for this): chapter 96
movements of our forces. On learning the approach of our troops he had, as usual, fled, and although immediate chase was given, he could not be found. On the following morning, however, two companies of the Seventh Illinois cavalry, under Capt. Webster, suddenly came upon Jeff., who was attempting to make a stand against Capt. Noleman's independent company of cavalry, which had previously been upon his track. The rebel force consisted of about two hundred mounted men, with three pieces of advantageously posted at the extremity of a long causeway, where the road led through a dense swamp. After several ineffectual attempts on the part of our men to outflank the rebels, which were uniformly defeated by their changing position, Capt. Webster determined, although the rebel force somewhat exceeded his own, to charge upon them; and placing himself at the head of his own and Capt. Noleman's commands, led them in a dashing charge toward the foe. As he neared them, however, the heart o
nished every officer who witnessed it. The division of Gen. Stanley, consisting of the Twenty-seventh, Thirty-ninth, Forty-third and Sixty-third Ohio regiments, supported the battery from two o'clock A. M., on the thirteenth, to daylight on the fourteenth, exposed to the full fury of the cannonade, without being able to return a shot, and the severe storm of that night, and displayed coolness, courage and fortitude worthy of all praise. In fact, the conduct of all the troops of this command so ons, that I was astonished and delighted, and feel very safe in predicting for them a brilliant career in arms. To General Stanley, who commanded in the trenches on the thirteenth, and to Gen. Hamilton, who relieved him on the morning of the fourteenth, I am specially indebted, not only for their efficient aid on the last days of the operations here, but for their uniform zeal and cooperation during the whole of the operations near this place. Brig.-General Plummer, commanding at Point Ple
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