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Jack Humphreys (search for this): chapter 7
trous fire from the right, left and front. The prisoners taken were yesterday on their way to this city, and were expected to reach here last night. They were but a few miles from the city late in the afternoon. They were marched by land under guard. Among others killed or wounded we have the names of the following officers: Killed-Colonel Ward, of the Fourth Florida regiment; Major William H. Palmer, of the First Virginia regiment, (and son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the Seventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelligence to this city left at twelve o'clock. The enemy landed their forces from gunboats (twenty-four in number) at or near West-Point.
as sent to Col. Blaisdell to proceed with the Eleventh Massachusetts and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania regiments cautiously down that road, to destroy any rebel force he might find, and break down any barrier the enemy might have thrown up to check the advance of our forces in that direction, and when this was executed to report the fact to the senior officer with the troops there, and on his return to send me word of the result of his mission. This was done, and word was sent to me through Adjt. Currier, of the Eleventh regiment. Up to this moment there had been a brisk musketry fire kept up on every part of the field, but its swelling volumes in the direction of Patterson satisfied me from the beginning of the engagement that the enemy had accumulated a heavy force in his front. Grover had already anticipated it, and had moved the main portion of the First Massachusetts regiment to receive it, while first, the Seventy-second New-York regiment, of Taylor's brigade, and soon after th
he staff more perceptible. All were most efficient and defiant of danger. I especially notice Capt. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General of Gen. Berry, and predict for him a career of usefulness and glory. My own staff were truly my means of vision in this battle in the woods. I have to deplore the loss of my. chief of staff, Capt. Wilson, who was killed while putting in execution my desire for a general onset at the period of the last charge, falling within the enemy's lines. Also, of Lieut. Barnard, late of West-Point, at the end of the engagement, after having previously lost a horse. Capt. W. V. Sturgis, my aid, was brave, active, and judicious. Lieut. Moore, another of my aids, renewed on the field his previous distinction gained abroad. My volunteer aid, Mr. Watts Depuyster, bore himself handsomely in this his first action. I have the honor to append the list of killed and wounded, which, though not impairing our future efficiency, was a severe loss for the few engaged. Ou
Joseph Dickinson (search for this): chapter 7
can speak but in general terms of the regiments and batteries engaged in the battle of Williamsburgh. Their list of the killed and wounded from among their numbers will forever determine the extent of their participation in this hard-fought and dearly-contested field. Their constancy and courage are deserving all praise. My profound and grateful acknowledgments are tendered to them. I am under great obligations to the officers of my staff for eminent services, and especially to Capt. Joseph Dickinson, my Assistant Adjutant-General, and to my Aids-de-Camp, Lieutenants Wm. H. Lawrence and Joseph Abbot, who were with me throughout the day. The loss of my division on this field was: Commissioned officers killed,21 Commissioned officers wounded,65 Enlisted men killed,317 Enlisted men wounded,837 Enlisted men missing,335   Total,1575 Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Joseph Hooker, Brigadier-General Commanding Division. General Kearney's official report.
the battery now in position, when the officers and cannoniers of Osborne's battery sprang forward, and in the time I am writing, had those pieces well at work. Bramhall's battery was now brought into action under that excellent officer, on the right of Webber's, and before nine o'clock every gun in Fort Magruder was silenced, anace. Flushed with their repulse of Stoneman, the rebels early began to advance their pickets on the left, and as quickly the determined Hooker drove them back. Bramhall's and Smith's batteries, both from New-York, were soon in action, but their progress was thwarted by the condition of the roads. The former was eventually lost, fought the signs of slaughter were abundant. Though many of the bodies had been buried, there were enough yet exposed to show the terrible effect of his shot. Bramhall's horses were thickly scattered over the ground, a certificate to his precarious position. That he managed to escape with his life is a wonder of the day. Here,
J. R. Taylor (search for this): chapter 7
ad already anticipated it, and had moved the main portion of the First Massachusetts regiment to receive it, while first, the Seventy-second New-York regiment, of Taylor's brigade, and soon after the Seventieth New-York regiment, of the same brigade, were ordered to strengthen Patterson. Col. Averill, of the Third Pennsylvania gigantic proportions. The left had been reinforced with the Seventy-third and Seventy-fourth New-York regiments--the only remaining ones of my reserve — under Col. Taylor, and all were engaged; yet its fortunes would ebb and flow despite the most determined courage and valor of my devoted officers and men. Three times the enemy a the same time. The orders to the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania regiment did not reach it, and it remained on the right. At this juncture word was received from Col. Taylor that the regiments of his command longest engaged were falling short of ammunition, and when he was informed that the supply-train was not yet up, a portion of
William H. Lawrence (search for this): chapter 7
e of Williamsburgh. Their list of the killed and wounded from among their numbers will forever determine the extent of their participation in this hard-fought and dearly-contested field. Their constancy and courage are deserving all praise. My profound and grateful acknowledgments are tendered to them. I am under great obligations to the officers of my staff for eminent services, and especially to Capt. Joseph Dickinson, my Assistant Adjutant-General, and to my Aids-de-Camp, Lieutenants Wm. H. Lawrence and Joseph Abbot, who were with me throughout the day. The loss of my division on this field was: Commissioned officers killed,21 Commissioned officers wounded,65 Enlisted men killed,317 Enlisted men wounded,837 Enlisted men missing,335   Total,1575 Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Joseph Hooker, Brigadier-General Commanding Division. General Kearney's official report. headquarters Third division, Heintzelman's corps, May 6, 1862. Captain: I
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 7
other cartridges than were gathered from the boxes of the fallen. Again the enemy were reinforced by the arrival of Longstreet's division. His troops had passed through Williamsburgh, on their retreat from Yorktown, and were recalled to strengthtimes my number, directed by the most accomplished General of the rebel army, Major-Gen. J. E. Johnston, assisted by Gens. Longstreet, Pryor, Gohlson and Pickett, with commands selected from the best troops in their army. The list of killed and womsburgh at daylight, and that they numbered from thirty to forty thousand. The Generals in command during the day were Longstreet, the former Methodist preacher, and Early, who led the brigade which was so decisively repulsed by Hancock. The notoeven o'clock to eleven o'clock A. M. The troops engaged on our side consisted of a portion of the division of Major-General Longstreet. An official letter from Gen. Johnston states that a handsome affair took place at Williamsburgh on Monday.
William H. Palmer (search for this): chapter 7
e deployed in a skirt of wood opposite our position, from which they were driven, subjected to a disastrous fire from the right, left and front. The prisoners taken were yesterday on their way to this city, and were expected to reach here last night. They were but a few miles from the city late in the afternoon. They were marched by land under guard. Among others killed or wounded we have the names of the following officers: Killed-Colonel Ward, of the Fourth Florida regiment; Major William H. Palmer, of the First Virginia regiment, (and son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the Seventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelligence to this city left at twelv
McAllister (search for this): chapter 7
ngagement that the enemy had accumulated a heavy force in his front. Grover had already anticipated it, and had moved the main portion of the First Massachusetts regiment to receive it, while first, the Seventy-second New-York regiment, of Taylor's brigade, and soon after the Seventieth New-York regiment, of the same brigade, were ordered to strengthen Patterson. Col. Averill, of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, had, with great kindness and gallantry, tendered me his services, while Lieut. McAllister, of the engineers, volunteered to make a reconnaissance of such of the enemy's works as were hidden from view, preparatory to carrying them by assault, should a suitable opportunity present itself for that object. For this service I am under many obligations to that accomplished officer. From the earliest moment of the attack, it was an object of deep solicitude to establish a connection with the troops in my immediate neighbor-hood on the Yorktown road, and as that had been accomp
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