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John A. Wharton (search for this): chapter 92
onsisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. Thege in good earnest. Colonel Forrest had assigned the attack on the first encampment to Col. John A. Wharton and his daring rangers, together with Colonel Lawton and the Second Georgia cavalry, whilwoke the still morning with their usual terrific yell, which enlivened the charge; and when Colonel Wharton, at the head of the column, reached the point where he was to turn to the right, he led hisge. Among these Lieut. Chase was killed, and George Duffield was severely wounded. He gives Col. Wharton credit for shooting him, and then pays him a well-merited compliment in saying that he is the called and danger was to be met. He was cool on all occasions, and a stranger to fear. Upon Col. Wharton was conferred the honor of bringing the prisoners through to this city, where they arrived sa
; the other four companies, Ninth Michigan volunteers, having been ordered to Tullahoma a month since, while nine companies of the Third Minnesota volunteers, Colonel Lester, (one company being on detached duty as train-guard,) four hundred and fifty strong, and Hewitt's battery, First regiment artillery, (two sections,) seventy-thad started a fire with the evident intention of burning them out. Of the surrender of the Third Minnesota volunteers, and Hewitt's battery, under command of Col. Lester, I cannot speak from personal knowledge, nor have I received any information from sources sufficiently reliable to warrant my communicating to you any details. ght resistance, and without any timely warning of the presence of the enemy, The rest of the force, consisting of the Third Minnesota and the artillery, under Colonel Lester, left its camp and took another position, which it maintained, with but few casualties, against the feeble attacks of the enemy until about three o'clock, whe
ebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm was given before the head of their column reached our pickets, about a mile distant, so that our men were formed and ready to receive them, although they came in at full speed. The Texans and a battalion of the Georgia regiment, in all over eight hundred strong, attacked the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. So fierce and impetuous was th
and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm was given before thedeed, so great was their panic, that their officers were unable to check the fugitives for a space of seven miles; and Col. Lawton, commanding the Georgia regiment, was subsequently arrested by General Forrest for misconduct under the fire of the enForrest had assigned the attack on the first encampment to Col. John A. Wharton and his daring rangers, together with Colonel Lawton and the Second Georgia cavalry, whilst he was to lead the remainder against the other forces. The Texans were now fu and twenty men, of all those assigned to this important work, were found with him — the remainder of the regiment and Col. Lawton's regiment following Col. Forrest. Supposing his whole force with him, he at once charged through the brigade wagon-y
e his headquarters in town, while I preferred camping with my own men, and therefore pitched my tent with the five companies of the Ninth Michigan volunteers. The force then at Murfreesboro was as follows: Five companies Ninth Michigan volunteers, Lieut.-Col. Parkhurst, two hundred strong, together with the first squadron Fourth Kentucky cavalry, eighty-one strong, were camped three fourths of a mile east of the town upon the Liberty Turnpike. One company, B, Ninth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Rounds, forty-two strong, occupied the Court.-House; the other four companies, Ninth Michigan volunteers, having been ordered to Tullahoma a month since, while nine companies of the Third Minnesota volunteers, Colonel Lester, (one company being on detached duty as train-guard,) four hundred and fifty strong, and Hewitt's battery, First regiment artillery, (two sections,) seventy-two strong, accupied the east bank of Stone's river, at a distance of more than----miles from the encampment of the de
James B. Fry (search for this): chapter 92
pon my parole not to bear arms against the confederate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General t for two hours, and repulsed in the most signal manner. Such is the conduct that duty and honor demand of every soldier; and this example is worthy of imitation by higher officers and larger commands. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring the country, and so effectual had their labors proved that they had filled Mu
J. T. Buell (search for this): chapter 92
til I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana regiment, anry, which it fought for two hours, and repulsed in the most signal manner. Such is the conduct that duty and honor demand of every soldier; and this example is worthy of imitation by higher officers and larger commands. By command of Major-General Buell. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Account by a participant. Nashville, July 25, 1862. For some days previous to the engagement, our scouts had been scouring the country, and so effectual had their labors proved that
William W. Duffield (search for this): chapter 92
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-thierate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. Jamppears from the best information that can be obtained that Brigadier-General Crittenden and Colonel Duffield, of the Ninth Michigan, with the six companies of that regiment and all of the cavalry, wertion that these were negro fables entirely unworthy of their attention. Since the departure of Duffield, the brigade has been under the command of Colonel Leicester, who had separated the regiments, irresistible fury, and hurled their death-shots into our slumbering tents. At this moment Colonel Duffield sprang into the centre of the combat, and received two wounds, in a vain endeavor to rally
Thomas Harrison (search for this): chapter 92
against four times their number, who had the advantage of position and long-range guns, at every point, inflicting terrible havoc upon the enemy. During one of these foot charges, the colonel, being mounted and leading his intrepid band, received a severe flesh-wound in his arm. But, nothing daunted, he still retained command until some time after, when Lieut.-Colonel Walker came up, when he turned it over to him. He soon effected a union with the remainder of the regiment, and with Major Thomas Harrison, led until the final surrender at eleven o'clock. During these four bloody hours, this small number, soon reduced below a hundred, did the work assigned to a thousand men, and undoubtedly to their gallantry, persistent determination, and unflinching charges upon these camps, is mainly attributable the final glorious issue. No blame can be imputed to the other three fourths of the regiment, that kept them from participating in this most honorable and desperate conflict, for they w
ttributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn of the quiet Sabbath found the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro. Being halted here for a few minutes the arms were examined and the plan of attack agreed
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