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Land's End, South-carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
to oppose our landing troops at Breach Inlet, should the attempt be made. Coming down along the shore of Sullivan's Island, from Breach Inlet, we next reach Fort Beauregard, a powerful sand battery, mounting very heavy guns, and situated on the turn of the island a little right of the Moultrie House hotel, from which it is separahs are going on, you must not suppose the enemy is inactive. The powerful work on Cumming's Point, named Battery Bee, opens, the long-range rifle-ordnance of Fort Beauregard join in, Moultrie hurls its heavy metal, the fifty guns that line the Redan swell the fire, and the tremendous armament of Sumter vomits forth its fiery hail.nt at which they would not have found themselves. 'Mid upper, nether and surrounding fires. They pass out of the focus of fire of Forts Sumter, Moultrie, Beauregard, and Bee, and they find themselves arrested under the ranges of Sumter, the Redan, Johnston, and Ripley. They get beyond this, and a concentric fire from Riple
Three Trees (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
just on the point of fouling, sheered off, and saved themselves and the fleet. The right-hand channel being thus obstructed, it remains to see what can be done with the left, between Sumter and Cumming's Point. But this, too, is still more effectually blockaded by a row of piles, rising ten feet above the water, and extending across the whole width of the passage. Looking up the harbor, another row of piles discloses itself, stretching across from Fort Ripley on the middle ground to Fort Johnson. It does not stretch entirely across, however, for midway is an opening, inviting the passage of the fleet. Submerged in the water, underneath that opening, is a torpedo filled with — incredible though the statement may seem, it is an actual fact--five thousand pounds of powder! Furthermore, above this first line of piles is a second, and above the second a third--while above all, and just behind the upper line of obstructions, are the three rebel iron-clads, drawn up in battle array,
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
mid-channel. Both Morris and Sullivan's Islands are scarcely removed above the level of the sea, which, indeed, would probably invade and cover them, were it not that the margin of the islands on their sea-frontage, is marked by a continuous narrow strip of low sand-hills, some five or six feet in height. Behind the second ridge of the islands, are alternate salt marsh, sand, and clumps of wood of live-oak, palmetto and tangled tropical undergrowths. The whole coast of South-Carolina and Georgia, consists of a labyrinth of islands and islets of this character, round which reedy creeks and rivers wind. With Sullivan's Island on our right, we run the eye up to its upper or north end, formed by Breach Inlet. Guarding this point, is Breach Inlet battery — a powerful sand-work, having a circular dome-like bomb-proof magazine in its centre. It is, however, three miles from the entrance of the harbor, and will not be able to molest our ships on their passage. Its chief value has bee
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
rown the barbette guns, which comprise all the heaviest portion of its armament. You can count distinctly each barbette gun-one, two, three, four, five on this; one, two, three, four on that, and so on all round, and it is easy to see that the ordnance is of the most formidable character. From a flag-staff on one of the angles of the fort, floats the confederate flag; from a flag-staff on the opposite angle floats the palmetto flag. Passing now to the left hand side of the harbor, on James Island, we first have the Wappoo battery, near Wappoo Creek, effectually commanding the embouchure of Ashley River and the left side of the city. Next, coming down, we have Fort Johnston, and between it and Castle Pinckney, on an artificial island raised by the rebels, on the middle ground, is Fort Ripley. Coming down to Cumming's Point, directly opposite Moultrie, is the Cumming's Point battery, named by the rebels Battery Bee, after the general of that name; south of Battery Bee, on Morris I
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
t Sumter, completely across the channel to Fort Moultrie, is a stout hawser, floating on lager-beertaneously with the similar broadsides from Fort Moultrie and all the other works within range, I fa of about one thousand four hundred yards, Fort Moultrie fired the first gun. The band was hushed aort, by the use of its cannon, assisted by Fort Moultrie and the guns of one or two sand batteries, The batteries on Sullivan's Island. Fort Moultrie opened the engagement. At three o'clock t During the entire fight, the batteries of Fort Moultrie maintained a well-directed fire against thnst Fort Sumter to give a spiteful shot to Fort Moultrie, showed how effectively and accurately the the foe. There was but one casualty at Fort Moultrie. A shot from one of the monitors cut away of which he soon died. The garrison of Fort Moultrie it would not be proper to enumerate. It cbout three o'clock the fight was opened by Fort Moultrie firing a shot. Three minutes later the ba[4 more...]
Nantucket (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
clad vessels, will be used in action. After the reduction of Fort Sumter, it is probable the next point of attack will be the batteries on Morris Island. The order of battle will be the line ahead, in the following succession: 1. Weehawken, with raft, Capt. John Rodgers. 2. Passaic, Capt. Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk, Commander John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides, Commodore Thos. Turner. 6. Catskill, Commander Geo. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax. 8. Nahant, Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk, Lieut. Commander Alex. C. Rhind. A squadron of reserve, of which Captain J. F. Green will be senior officer, will be formed out-side the bar, and near the entrance buoy, consisting of the following vessels: Canandaigua, Capt. Joseph H. Green. Unadilla, Lieut. Commander S. P. Quackenbush. Housatonic, Capt. Wm. R. Taylor. Wissahickon, Lieut. Commander J. G. Davis. Huron, Lieut. Commander G.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 168
chanical contrivances and combinations, must seriously interfere with obtaining the best results from them. W. S. --New-York Times. Correspondence between Major-General Hunter and Admiral Du Pont. Headquarters Department of the South, United States transport Ben Deford, April 8, 1863. Admiral S. F. Du Pont, Flag-Ship New Ironsides, off Fort Sumter: Admiral: Not knowing what have been the results of your attack of yesterday, so far as Fort Sumter is concerned, I cannot but congratulatrison knew that the hour of trial was at hand, and the greatest enthusiasm and alacrity prevailed. The men rushed to their guns with shouting and yells of exultation. The regimental hand was ordered to the rampart. The garrison flag (the confederate States) was already flying defiantly from the staff at the northern apex of the pentagonal fortress. The blue and white banner of the Palmetto State was given to the wind on the south-west corner of the work, and the elegant black and white color
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
a descriptive character, without any claim to scientific precision. The Nahant received in all thirty wounds, several of them bad fractures of the deck and sides, below and above the water-line. The most fatal blow, however, was given by a heavy rifled shot, which struck the pilot-house, and dislodged several of the bolts, one of which, driven violently inward, wounded all of the three inmates of the pilot-house — the Captain, (Captain Downs, Massachusetts,) the Pilot, (Isaac Sofield, New-Jersey,) and the Quartermaster, (Edward Cobb, Massachusetts.) The Quartermaster had been struck by the bolt on the back of the skull, which received a compound comminuted fracture. When I saw the poor fellow, late at night, he was in a state of coma, his life ebbing away. He died this morning. The pilot's wound was a severe contusion of the neck and shoulder, and he is doing well. The Captain received merely a slight contusion of the foot. Other bolts were driven in, in the turret also, and
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
s were visible just outside the bar, one of which was the Ironsides, and four were monitors or turreted iron-clads. On the morning of the sixteenth, (Monday,) as the fog lifted, it was discovered that the Ironsides, eight monitors, and a large number of other vessels were in sight, the Ironsides having already crossed the bar and come to anchor off Morris Island. An infantry force, variously estimated at from three thousand to six thousand, was landed on Coles's Island, off the mouth of Stono River, during Sunday night. But before proceeding further, it may be well to restate the names of the torts and batteries that participated in the fight. They are Fort Sumter in the harbor, Fort Wagner and Cumming's Point Battery on Morris Island, the first looking seaward, and the second across the harbor; and Fort Moultrie, Battery Bee, and Battery Beau-regard, on Sullivan's Island. Looking out to sea from Charleston, Morris Island is on the extreme right, and Sullivan's Island on the ex
Wappoo Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 168
st portion of its armament. You can count distinctly each barbette gun-one, two, three, four, five on this; one, two, three, four on that, and so on all round, and it is easy to see that the ordnance is of the most formidable character. From a flag-staff on one of the angles of the fort, floats the confederate flag; from a flag-staff on the opposite angle floats the palmetto flag. Passing now to the left hand side of the harbor, on James Island, we first have the Wappoo battery, near Wappoo Creek, effectually commanding the embouchure of Ashley River and the left side of the city. Next, coming down, we have Fort Johnston, and between it and Castle Pinckney, on an artificial island raised by the rebels, on the middle ground, is Fort Ripley. Coming down to Cumming's Point, directly opposite Moultrie, is the Cumming's Point battery, named by the rebels Battery Bee, after the general of that name; south of Battery Bee, on Morris Island, is Fort Wagner, a very extensive sand battery
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