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leman who witnessed their entree, at five thousand. Before this news came, and while all was vague rumor and perplexing uncertainty, many of our fighting men whom we relied upon as certain to die in the last ditch, if die they must, performed a grand strategical movement, and fell back to a new base of operations at Cameron, Moundsville, Wheeling, and various other points in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Those whose lips retained the crimson hue of natural life, and whose knees did not quake like Caesar's with the ague in Spain, remained and busied themselves in hunting up arms, and in making every effort to defend the place against the impending assault. A delegation went to Mannington, and returned on Tuesday morning with two companies of militia and as many guns as were fit for use. The whole defensive force consisted of only three hundred men, made up of companies D and F, One Hundred and Sixth New-York volunteers--one hundred and five men; two companies of the One Hundred and Seventy-
William E. Jones (search for this): chapter 188
of the One Hundred and Seventy-sixth Virginia militia--one hundred and seventeen men; thirty-eight men of company A, Sixth Virginia; a few of company B, Sixth Virginia, and about forty citizen soldiers. The rebel army was commanded by General William E. Jones, and consisted, according to his statement, of seven regiments of cavalry, one regiment of mounted infantry, and three hundred mounted sharp-shooters, in all six thousand men, many of them being of the celebrated Ashby's cavalry. Wedn obstinate, determined resistance made by the Unionists; the length of time they held out; and, stranger still, only one killed and four wounded on our side, while the rebel loss, according to their own admission, was fifty or sixty. Indeed, General Jones told Captain Chamberlain that we had killed and disabled about a hundred of his men. He, as well as the rebel soldiers, complimented us on the gallantry with which we maintained our various positions. Where all who took up arms did so wel
re in the town was robbed of every thing the thieves fancied. The home rebels, pointed out the private property they wanted destroyed, and it was done. A valuable steam saw-mill, belonging to J. N. Cromwell & Co., was burned. The National printing-office was destroyed because it has been uncompromisingly Union, while the Butternut concern in Morgantown was uninjured, because, as the traitors said, it was on their side and was devoted to their cause. The law and private libraries of Governor Pierpoint were carried into the street in front of his office, and burned; every horse in town and surrounding country was taken. At least five hundred horses were taken out of Marion County alone. Fortunately the Union men had moved their horses out of the neighborhood, while the secesh relied on their opposition to the Government, which has always protected them, for security. Hence in the loss of horses they are by far the greater sufferers, as the raiders were no respecters of persons i
Doc. 178.-battle of Fairmont, Virginia. Fairmont, Virginia, May 4, 1863. The rebel raid into West-Virginia has come and gone. The smoke of battle has drifted away, and the thousand rumors have given place to well-determined facts. I propose to describe briefly what I understand to be the route taken by the raiders after entering our lines until they escaped beyond them; and, with as much detail as time will permit, the engagement at this place. It appears that on Friday and Saturday, the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth ultimo, the rebels, having driven our small forces from Beverly and Philippi back to Grafton, crossed the railroad at several points between Grafton and Rowlesburgh, and went to Kingwood, in Preston County, thence to Morgantown, which place they reached on Monday, at two P. M. Tuesday morning they left Morgantown, and came up on the east bank of the river to within seven or eight miles of this place, where they were met by another body, which crossed the
John F. Mulligan (search for this): chapter 188
m at the cowardly rebels, who, notwithstanding they had twenty to our one, fought Indian fashion, from behind whatever would conceal them. Finding further resistance utterly hopeless, and just as the rebel cavalry were ready for a grand charge, I which must have resulted in the total destruction of the gallant little band, a white flag was raised from a house near by, and the firing ceased. Scarcely had the formalities of the capitulation been completed, when two pieces of ordnance from Mulligan's command at Grafton opened on them from the opposite side of the river. They then double-quicked the prisoners off the field, and placed them in the court-house, where they were paroled about nine o'clock at night. The rebels on the left bank of the river were soon shelled out of range, but those on the same side as the battery made a desperate effort to tear up the road in the rear of the battery to prevent its return. They took up one or more rails, and piled several cords of wood o
inia. Fairmont, Virginia, May 4, 1863. The rebel raid into West-Virginia has come and gone. The smoke of battle has drifted away, and the thousand rumors have given place to well-determined facts. I propose to describe briefly what I understand to be the route taken by the raiders after entering our lines until they escaped beyond them; and, with as much detail as time will permit, the engagement at this place. It appears that on Friday and Saturday, the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth ultimo, the rebels, having driven our small forces from Beverly and Philippi back to Grafton, crossed the railroad at several points between Grafton and Rowlesburgh, and went to Kingwood, in Preston County, thence to Morgantown, which place they reached on Monday, at two P. M. Tuesday morning they left Morgantown, and came up on the east bank of the river to within seven or eight miles of this place, where they were met by another body, which crossed the railroad subsequently. The whole for
tle of Fairmont, Virginia. Fairmont, Virginia, May 4, 1863. The rebel raid into West-Virginia has come and gone. The smoke of battle has drifted away, and the thousand rumors have given place to well-determined facts. I propose to describe briefly what I understand to be the route taken by the raiders after entering our lines until they escaped beyond them; and, with as much detail as time will permit, the engagement at this place. It appears that on Friday and Saturday, the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth ultimo, the rebels, having driven our small forces from Beverly and Philippi back to Grafton, crossed the railroad at several points between Grafton and Rowlesburgh, and went to Kingwood, in Preston County, thence to Morgantown, which place they reached on Monday, at two P. M. Tuesday morning they left Morgantown, and came up on the east bank of the river to within seven or eight miles of this place, where they were met by another body, which crossed the railroad subsequ
May 4th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 188
Doc. 178.-battle of Fairmont, Virginia. Fairmont, Virginia, May 4, 1863. The rebel raid into West-Virginia has come and gone. The smoke of battle has drifted away, and the thousand rumors have given place to well-determined facts. I propose to describe briefly what I understand to be the route taken by the raiders after entering our lines until they escaped beyond them; and, with as much detail as time will permit, the engagement at this place. It appears that on Friday and Saturday, the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth ultimo, the rebels, having driven our small forces from Beverly and Philippi back to Grafton, crossed the railroad at several points between Grafton and Rowlesburgh, and went to Kingwood, in Preston County, thence to Morgantown, which place they reached on Monday, at two P. M. Tuesday morning they left Morgantown, and came up on the east bank of the river to within seven or eight miles of this place, where they were met by another body, which crossed the
piers into the river. The whole cost of its erection was four hundred and ninety-six thousand dollars, two thirds of which was expended in getting the piers above the high-water mark, owing to the great depth of water and mud above the solid rock. The destruction of this bridge is one of the most serious losses this railroad has sustained during the war. Months must elapse before even a temporary bridge can be erected. The battle we have endeavored to describe, was fought on Wednesday, April twenty-ninth, and was in many respects the most remarkable in the annals of warfare. The great disparity in the numbers engaged; the obstinate, determined resistance made by the Unionists; the length of time they held out; and, stranger still, only one killed and four wounded on our side, while the rebel loss, according to their own admission, was fifty or sixty. Indeed, General Jones told Captain Chamberlain that we had killed and disabled about a hundred of his men. He, as well as the
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