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flank, in case of an attack from that quarter. Three detached companies of cavalry, under Captain Denson, were ordered to act as vedettes in the plain south of the city, and to transmit to General d orders from Brigadier-General Fagan, to advance on the Little Rock road with my regiment, Captains Denson's, Miller's and------companies of cavalry, and the section of artillery; make a feint on tht without doing any injury. Immediately the gunboat commenced firing, one shell exploded in Captain Denson's company, wounding three men, and killing three horses. Captain Blocker reported to me wital Holmes to halt at a designated position, as the rear guard of the army. By my direction, Captain Denson's company applied the torch to the negro quarters, which were consumed, together with five te morning the demonstrations of the enemy behind the levee were of a threatening character. Captain Denson, commanding cavalry detachment, rendered efficient service in counteracting his movements an
B. F. Fall (search for this): chapter 47
ty, was sent, by me at daylight, with important orders to Colonel Brooks, some distance from me on my right. I was consequently deprived of the valuable assistance his quickness and daring so well qualify him to render on the field. Captain John B. Howell, my Ordnance Officer, was ordered to remain constantly with his ammunition train, which, as above stated, had to be left in the rear. This deprived me of the immediate services of this gallant officer. The officers of my staff, Major B. F. Fall, brigade Commissary; Mr. James H. Tucker volunteer Aid-de-Camp, and Mr. J. W. Paul, acting Inspector-General, are all entitled to my thanks for the assistance rendered me during the engagement. The aggregate force engaged against Fort Hindman and the defences in front of it, was thirteen hundred and thirty-nine. I have, Major, the honor to be, With much respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Fagan, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel King. Heaquarters King's regime
Richard T. Morrison (search for this): chapter 47
the responsible and onerous duties of his office), surpassed himself this day in the intrepid manner with which he bore himself throughout the conflict, rallying the troops again and again, and urging them forward to the scene of action. In this work, under the hottest fire of the enemy, and until we had swept their intrenchments and carried the hill, he was faithfully, fearlessly, and gallantly assisted by Major L. A. Maclean, A. A. G. My thanks are due to my Aids-de-Camp, Lieutenant Richard T. Morrison and Lieutenant Celsus Price, for their willing assistance promptly rendered upon this, as upon other hotly contested fields. I commend all these officers to the Lieutenant-General commanding, and through him to the President, for promotion, on account of gallant and meritorious conduct in the field. Acting Engineers, John Mhoon, of Alabama, and D. C. Cage, of Mississippi, not only deserve honorable mention for their gallantry upon the field, but for the skill and energy wit
J. C. Clark (search for this): chapter 47
flank constantly engaging my forces. At eleven A. M., I received orders from General Holmes to retire. My loss was fourteen killed, fifty-two wounded, one missing. Among the killed were Major R. H. Smith, my division Quartermaster, and Captain J. C. Clark, of Company D, Shelby's regiment. Major Smith was a gallant and valuable officer; he was shot dead beside a piece of artillery, encouraging and assisting the canonniers in their duties. Captain Clark was a most exemplary man and excellenCaptain Clark was a most exemplary man and excellent officer; he was killed leading his men forward. Amongst the wounded, I regret to announce that Colonel Shelby, commanding brigade, who was ever in the thickest of the fight, received a painful and serious wound in the wrist. For a more special report of the conduct of the several regiments and their officers, I respectfully refer you to the brigade commander. As yet I have not received the report for Shelby's brigade — will forward it as soon as received — have delayed this report aw
Joseph Murray (search for this): chapter 47
in brave officers and men that my brigade sustained on that bloody field. The following commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The follow
ounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled11  Wounded41  Missing237--289 Pindall's sharps'trsKilled9  Wounded26  Missing
bloody field. The following commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and
A. C. Peck (search for this): chapter 47
ments, one ambulance and team, and a small lot of clothing and canteens. Companies B and K (skirmishers), commanded respectively by Captains F. R. Earle and Arkansas Wilson, deserve especial mention for the steadiness with which they advanced, drove the enemy before them, and maintained their positions under a heavy artillery fire. Lieutenant-Colonel Gunter and Major Pettigrew were constantly at their posts in the discharge of their duties. The only casualty in my regiment was private A. C. Peck, Company B, severely wounded in the chest. I am, Captain, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. H. Brooks, Colonel, commanding. Report of Colonel Bell's regiment. camp Bayou Deview, July 10, 1863. Captain Thomas: Captain: I have the honor to make my report of the part taken by Bell's regiment in the engagement of the fourth instant at Helena. We moved for half a mile at double-quick, passing through brush and logs, with which the road was blockaded, and appro
King threw him perhaps on that ground most difficult of all to get over. Had it not been for the determined character of this brave young Colonel, his regiment, perhaps, would not have been advanced over all the difficulties he met with. Major Dillard and Adjutant Bourne, of same regiment (King's), deserve much praise for the assistance they rendered Colonel King. Colonel Hawthorne was constantly at the front, cheering his men on from one success to another. When orders came from Lieutreastworks, keeping up a steady fire at the fort, until about eleven o'clock A. M., at which time we were ordered off the field. I cannot speak too highly of the most of my officers and men throughout the fight, particularly of the gallant Major Dillard and Adjutant Bourne, who were in every charge, and cheering the men on at all times. My loss was as follows: twelve killed, forty-six wounded, and twenty missing. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. P. King, Colonel, c
Gordon Rear (search for this): chapter 47
ed instantly, the capture of Hindman Hill, and consequently of the town, would have been of easy occurrence. I cannot close this report without expressing my obligations to his Excellency, Harris Flanigan, Governor of Arkansas, who accompanied me, and had my confidence, during the whole campaign. I owe to his cool, discriminating judgment, many valuable suggestions. His presence, confidence, and zeal had no little influence on the spirit and energy of the Arkansas troops. He and Colonel Gordon Rear, Adjutant-General of the State, acted as volunteer Aids-de-Camp on my staff during the battle. As the expedition failed, which should have succeeded, I refrain from all expressions of commendation, believing that the brave officers and men who distinguished themselves will willingly forego the applause due to them, in consideration that our beloved country reaped no benefit from their exploits. I have the honor to be, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thomas
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