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Clay Taylor (search for this): chapter 47
the less conspicuous, but equally useful, services of Major Isaac Brinker and Major John Reid be passed over in silence. To the practical good sense and untiring and well directed energy of the former, as Chief Quartermaster of my division, I am greatly indebted for the accomplishment of the march to Helena and back to this point; while the latter, as Chief Commissary of Subsistence, has, in spite of many difficulties, continued to subsist the troops both regularly and well. Lieutenant-Colonel Clay Taylor, Chief of Artillery and acting Chief of Ordnance, discharged the onerous duties of both those offices with laborious fidelity and to my entire satisfaction. To my Chief Surgeon, Thomas D. Wooten, to Surgeon William M. McPheeters, and to Assistant Field Purveyor R. M. Slaughter, my constant thanks and commendation are due for the sedulous manner in which they have at all times devoted themselves to the sick and wounded, but never more humanely or more conspicuously than upon th
L. M. Walker (search for this): chapter 47
n listening for the guns of Generals Price, Marmaduke, and Walker, but thus far we had listened in vain. Every brigade, excged could I have advanced. I twice dispatched to Brigadier-General Walker to advance and assist me in dislodging them. It gained the position, could have been driven from it by General Walker's brigade, which did not come to the support of my lef to my left and rear. I could see the force which engaged Walker's brigade, and at no time did it exceed five hundred; I think three hundred a big estimate. Walker's brigade not only did not prevent reinforcements from going to Fort Reiter, but tarmaduke, Brigadier-General, commanding. Report of General Walker. Headquarters in the field, camp near Lick Creek,am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, L. M. Walker, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel Dobbins. in the field, July 5, 1863. Brigadier-General Walker: General: I respectfully submit the following report of the movemen
P. G. Roper (search for this): chapter 47
e road over which we passed (known as the Hill road, from Little Rock to Helena) was extremely rugged, and it was not without considerable difficulty, and great fatigue to the men, that we succeeded in getting within one mile of the enemy's intrenchments. At this point I found the road blockaded with fallen timber to such an extent, that I halted the brigade, of which I was temporarily in command, sent Captain Millar's company, which had been in advance, to the rear, and sent forward Captain P. G. Roper's company (A), deployed as skirmishers. General Fagan now arrived at the head of the column, and ordering all the field and staff officers to dismount, we moved forward as rapidly as possible towards the intrenchments — the skirmishers deployed on either side of the road, keeping well in advance of the main body. At five minutes past four o'clock A. M., my skirmishers reported the enemy in sight. By order of General Fagan I moved my regiment in double-quick by the right flank, alon
E. T. Delony (search for this): chapter 47
hell exploded in Captain Denson's company, wounding three men, and killing three horses. Captain Blocker reported to me with his battery, but a position for it could not be obtained. I moved Etter's section to the hill, and upon gaming the summit it was found impracticable to use but one piece. This opened briskly, drawing a terrific fire from the battery and gunboat, and after expending thirteen rounds Lieutenant Arnett was compelled to withdraw. About eleven o'clock, I ordered Lieutenant E. T. Delony upon the hill with the gun. The range of the enemy's guns was so accurate, and the fire so furious, that he retired after firing eight rounds. The force in front and on the right was fully three times as large as mine. An advance to attack the enemy in the rifle-pits would have subjected my small command to the heavy guns of Fort Curtis, a light battery in the rear of the works, an enfilading fire from the rifled battery, and an attack in flank and rear from the levee. Under thes
battalion to withdraw their commands in good order, and fight the enemy as they retired. At half-past 10 A. M., I withdrew my command from the field. It gives me great pain to report the heavy losses in brave officers and men that my brigade sustained on that bloody field. The following commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieute
Edward L. Thomas (search for this): chapter 47
ants of regiments and Pindall's battalion to withdraw their commands in good order, and fight the enemy as they retired. At half-past 10 A. M., I withdrew my command from the field. It gives me great pain to report the heavy losses in brave officers and men that my brigade sustained on that bloody field. The following commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gil
Allan Polk (search for this): chapter 47
The thinned ranks of my regiments became thinner and thinner each moment. The guns of the enemy (not more than one hundred or one hundred and fifty yards distant) were telling sadly against us, whilst the heat, the want of water, and the toil, were no mean auxiliaries. Still, the brave men left stood manfully up to the discharge of their duty. At this time, written orders were received from Lieutenant-General Holmes, directing that I withdraw my troops from the field, and fall back to Allan Polk's (six miles in the rear). We retired from the field, and fell back slowly to that point. It was in the last assault upon the fort that Major Cocke, of Hawthorne's regiment, received a severe wound in the shoulder. I would make especial mention of this brave and accomplished officer — his daring was conspicuous throughout the engagement. Here, also, the much beloved Captain Walton Watkins, whilst most gallantly leading his company over the enemy's works, fell. It has never been my lo
Thomas H. Holmes (search for this): chapter 47
: the battle of Helena. Report of Lieutenant-General Holmes. little Rock, August 14, 1863. respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thomas H. Holmes, Lieutenant-General. Report of Majore miles of Helena. At this point, Lieutenant-General Holmes, having assumed the immediate commanork them. While giving these orders Lieutenant-General Holmes rode up and ordered me at once to th men; but, before they were able to do so, General Holmes again, in a peremptory manner, ordered me ld without orders. Having been ordered by General Holmes to the part of the field upon which Generae, written orders were received from Lieutenant-General Holmes, directing that I withdraw my troopss to another. When orders came from Lieutenant-General Holmes to abandon the field, Colonel Hawthoand, subsequently, instructions from Lieutenant-General Holmes to halt at a designated position, as. At eleven A. M., I received orders from General Holmes to retire. My loss was fourteen killed,
Cullen Bradley (search for this): chapter 47
brigade sustained on that bloody field. The following commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in ea
ll's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled11  Wounded41  Missing237--289 Pindall's sharps'trsKilled9
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